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Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Jan.-June 1927)"

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D £007 1202516 b RARY. 

California State Library 



I 
1 




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35868 



Established July 20, 1856 



0i F|ANGI«eQ 




TER 




/cil. cix 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 1, 1927 



No. 1 



1927 

By ELEANOR F. ROSS 

With the dying of the old year, we all have had the inclination at times to say: "I'll talk it over with him (or her) 
wound the first of the year ;" 

Or, "The first of the year I'll fix that deal"; or, "I'll wait till New Year's before I make a change." 

The New Year, like good resolutions, is synonymous with Change. 

The calendar of Time is man-made, and with the coming of the new year, a throng of new conditions, new ex- 
periences, most of them man-made, also, are in store for us, — inevitable and pregnant with good or ill. 

\11 of us appear to welcome change in everything except our business life. We like a change of styles; a change 
n our pleasures; a change of program ; a change in our diet ; a change of climate or of scene, in vacation time; and the 
number of people who desire a change of marital partners is steadily on the increase. 

But a change of position, a change in our daily routine of business, even in the arrangement of our office furniture, 
is looked upon askance, with suspicion, and often with fear, by the ordinary man or woman. 

"A rolling stone gathers no moss," — there is truth in this moss-grown maxim ; nevertheless, the worker who is averse 
to changing his position, who sticks to the same environment year after year, deluding himself that it is absolutely 
secure, becomes eventually, not only "stale" on the job, but finds himself incapacitated by a gradually narrowed view- 
point, and a diminished reserve of courage, force, originality, when he is again thrown out upon the world. 

The greater our feeling of security in the little niche of life we each occupy, the greater the lack of initiative. 
We are so sure of ourselves, our talents, our efficiency, that we unconsciously slow down in our actions, or our 
mental process. We miss the spur, the incentive which uncertainty bring-; we become smug. 

"I have never made a change yet," said an old sea captain to me the other evening, "but what I have been glad 
of it in the end! A captain, you know." be went on. "gets as fond of his ship as he does of his wife, his home, his chil- 
dren. He loves her as if she was a personality, another being. 

"Think what deeply-moored feelings must be broken when a sailor man must quit the ship he has lived in for years, 
and take charge of some other water-craft which he perhaps, at first sight, dislikes 1 

"Only a sea man, can fully understand his emotions. 

"But a man can become too fond of his environment, to., much in love with his own ship; too sure of his cargo and 
bis harbor. Its just as well, sometimes, to be put aboard another vessel, or cast adrift, to sink or swim, as the case may 
ln\ Even a sailor can become too -oft." 

lust ahead of us, good folks, looms the year 1927. 

We might liken it to a ship in lull sail, bearing down upon us gallantly, its proud prow cutting the waves into curi- 
um spume, its mighty masts aspiring to the heavens. 

W e are to go aboard and set sail, possibly, to some new port, over (to us) strange and uncharted seas. 

We have no idea as to what harbor we may reach; whether we will meet with new friendships or new l.>ves; nor 
what emprise along artistic or business lines we may encounter on our journey. 

But whatever is before us in this New Year of 1927, let us greet it with hands outstretched in welcome; with cour- 
ageous hearts, with high hopes! 

For the New Year i- synonymous with Change! 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 192 




To all our readers and friends a Happy 
A Happy New Year New Year! The last year has abounded 
in prosperity for the people of thi> 
land and the prospects are, according to the views of the ex- 
perts, very promising for a continuance of the unusual, in 
fact, unique condition of economic and industrial well-being. 
The land is happy and peaceful; there are no shadows im- 
pending, and as far as we can see, our path leads along into 
pleasant places. 

Along with our commercial and industrial prosperity, there 
are signs of a rapid development of our people in culture and 
the appreciation of those refinements of life, without which 
economic wealth in itself is unsatisfactory. There was never 
a time in our history when the inducements of art and the 
things of the spirit were more plain than at present. 

We have a population which is far in advance of anything 
which has yet been attained, in material well being. Our 
working people enjoy a condition of material welfare which 
seems like a dream of heaven to those of less fortunate lands. 
And, with the improvement in their life conditions, the people 
have turned their attention to higher matters and are showing 
a disposition to enjoy things, which have heretofore belonged 
exclusively to the more fortunately placed. 

One notable example of this tendency has been the marvel- 
ous development in musical appreciation, which has become so 
evident in our city. We now rank among the very first in 
the world in appreciation of the best in musical art. 

We have always been anient advocates of the humanizing of 
life by the development of culture and we feel a great joy and 
pride in this later growth of our city. 



If anybody had told the world a short 
The Dictator Craze ten years ago that great portions of its 
area, some of which represent very high- 
ly developed and civilized people, would have abandoned the 
road to democracy and have entered upon the broad highway 
of autocracy, he would have been loudly denounced and prob- 
ably very much execrated. But he would have been a true 
prophet, none the less. 

Today we have dictatorships in Italy, Russia, Spain, China. 
Hungary, Poland, Venezuela, Belgium, Japan, Greece and 
Mexico. Some of them are more modified than others and, 
in some, perhaps the dictatorship is more or less veiled, but it 
is a very thin veil and very soon the face of the autocrat will 
be fully revealed. Other nations totter on the edge of dictator- 
ships. It was but yesterday that France, at least, appeared verv 
likely to slide down into the gulf along with the others. 

The Teutonic nations are so far standing firmly on their 
feet and are reaching forward to better conditions of de- 
mocracy. But even they are not free from the threat, at times. 
For example, if a crisis were to arise in Germany, it would be 
hard to say how the matter would be resolved. The Scandin- 
avian countries are solidly democratic and under their tradi- 
tional sovereigns are making distinct social and political pro- 
gress. 

Britain is firm in the paths of democratic development. In 
spite of the strain of the war and of the last year, there is no 
tendency towards an autocratic tyranny. Britain will stand or 
fall upon the doctrines of freedom and, with her Dominions, 
will, along with ourselves, prove the bulwark of liberty against 
a world which has gone crazy wdth yearnings for autocracy. 



This is the time for hoping; the tim 
Hopes for Our City when we forecast, in our secret heart 
the things which we fondly and pel 
haps hopelessly yearn to see. There are a few things which w 
should like to see in San Francisco during the coming yea: 
So far. we have been disappointed in some of them, so oftet 
that they appear to be beyond all our possibilities. Still, hop 
springs eternal and we trust, rather shakily, but still we trui 
in their realization. 

For example, we have heard that busses have been ordere 
for the Embarcadero. As far as we can learn, they are not goin 
ti> lie many anil they are not going to be very large. But w 
are informed, and on such information and belief allege, th; 
there will be busses on the Embarcadero this year. That wi 
he very nice, particularly for those people who work there an 
have to traverse the hard street, with the State railroad freigl 
trains making a crossing of the street quite a little dangerou 

And, speaking of those State railway trains, we are informe 
that they are going to cease choosing the busiest hours of corr 
muting travel in order to block the way to the Ferry. Th 
State Railway is the most destructive agency of transbay famil 
life known to social investigators. To be late for dinner and t 
explain that the State railway freight has caused the troubl 
i- never hailed with joy by the waiting wife. Family distrm 
creeps in and the divorce lawyer benefits. We are too optin 
istic, perhaps, but the fact remains that there is just a chanc 
'if the cessation of this trouble. 

Then, we have heard that the municipality is going to ru 
street cars into some of those districts which are at presei 
almost inaccessible. The weary shopper has had a terribl 
time this vear and should be relieved before next Christmas. 



The United States Circuit Court c 
A New Appeal Judge Appeal ranks next in importance t 
the Supreme Court at Washingto 
and any appointment to the bench in the Post Office Buildin 
i- a matter of great importance to the people of the Ninth Cit 
cuit, which includes the whole of the Pacific Coast federal leg? 
jurisdiction. 

Judge Erskine M. Ross, who has for a long time been o 
that bench, has now resigned. He was a Circuit Judge at Lc 
Angeles, and after the creation of the Circuit Court of Af 
peals became automatically a judge of that body. He has ha* 
a very brilliant career and his name is associated with some c 
the most important decisions in the history of the country. 

Now, the President has appointed Frank S. Dietrich, Unite 
States District Judge of Idaho, to succeed Judge Ross. He i 
well known in San Francisco, for he has often sat here to de 
termine trial cases and has made an impression of sagacity an 
knowledge in the handling of weighty and important ma' ten 
In his own court he tried the case of Senator Burton K. Wheel 
er, for malfeasance in office, as Senator from Montana. 

Judge Dietrich has been sponsored enthusiastically by Ser 
alor Borah and was appointed to the federal bench by Presj 
dent Roosevelt in 1907 at his instance. There is no questio 
as to the soundness of his judgment and there is every reaso 
to expect a distinct strengthening of the court through hi 
appointment. 

Judge Dietrich was born in Ottawa, Kansas, on January 21 
1863. and was an instructor in law at Ottawa University, Kar 
sas, before being admitted to the practice of law. 



The demands of the Stat 
State Employes and Pensions are increasing at a rate whic 

bids fair, if continued, t 
make as great demands upon us as the feudal dues did upo 
our European forefathers. We have called attention man 
times to the dangerous increase in state expenditures, whic 



January 1,1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



have mounted so constantly since the war, as to threaten the 
stability of finance in some of the poorer states. Now, we 
have a new demand made by the Civil Service Commissioner 
of the State of California. 

David J. Reese, the Commissioner, in the course of his an- 
i nual report, makes a strong appeal for a pension and retire- 
ment sys'.em in this State. He says that this is necessary, in 
nattier to secure the greatest results from the merit system. He 
S&ys that the system must be comprehensive and adequate as 
ar as employees are concerned, which means that it must 
n|ensure their future. 

We have no objection to the future of people being assured. 
"It might be a very good thing, always provided that it could be 
afforded, for everyone to be assured of a sufficient competency 
in old age to live without fear or favor and free from depend- 
ence upon others. That has always been the objective. Gen- 
erally, it is considered to be the reward for a laborious and sav- 
ing life. -? 
Now, the demand is made on behalf of state employees alone. 
They are to be favored, to the extent of not having to save for 
their old age. The rest of us have to take our chances. Why 
should State employees be thus favored? Are they more ex- 
' posed to the vicissi'udes of life than the rest of us? We do not 
iee it. The Commissioner says that, as soon as they become a 
little inefficient, they are discharged. Is it not true that all 
af us are discharge:! as soon as we become unable to do our 
full stint? 

We do not approve of pensions for favored classes. 



There has been a demonstration over the ac- 
Fair Play to All quittal of Edward L. Doheny, multi-million- 
aire, and Albert B. Fall, former Secretary 
)f the Interior, upon charges of conspiring to defraud the gov- 
arnment in the mat er of the leasing of the Elk Hills navy oil 
•eserves. What has occurred with regard to this acquittal in 
n :he United States Senate, is a disgrace to the country. 

We have always felt that the charges made in connection 
^.vith this affair were false and that Mr. Doheny was made the 
victim of a political attack, which was cruel in the extreme 
o mil could serve no good purpose. Now, however, the case has 
:orr.e up for trial and resulted in a speedy and unconditional 
icquittal. This should sc'.tle the matter. An acquittal, ac- 
cording to our conceptions of what constitutes a trial, means 
he complete exoneration of the accused. 

When a man accused is found to be not guilty, decency re- 
liiircs al least silence and should require congratulation from 
Bose of good will. In this case, however, the United States 
enate was the scene of a disgusting and vulgar attack upon 
he jury and the court by certain senators, no ably by Senator 
r | lellin of Alabama, who went so far as to hint that lynching 
should be undertaken and that Mr. Fall should have a "grass- 
ope necktie." 

When a man. holding such a position, allows himself to use 
aich language, ii is deplorable. It is all the more so. on ac- 
ount of its cowardice, for, of course, the remarks of a Senator 
! ire privileged when made on the floor of the house. Such con- 
tact should meet with some punishment at the hands of the 
Rople. 

As for the trial; it was undoubtedly well conducted and 
[uite fair in every respect. Senator Walsh, the strongest 
tnemy of Mr. Fall, says that it was "past all criticism." 



I«3 



— The Orleans Gol 1 Company has an option embracing 140 
icres of placer mining claims on the Klamath River in Hum- 
aoldt and Siskiyou counties. The company has been allowed 
i permit to issue $255,000 of its $500,000 capital stock in pay- 
nent for the option. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



Some people get on the right track and then go in the 
wrong direction. 

* * # 

Some of the present-day young women may be dumb, 
but no one can get much on them. 

* * * 

All would be well if the silkworm could work up a fondness 
for the cotton-plant. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

The only man who makes a quick clean-up in Wall Street 
and gets away with it is a janitor. — Dallas News. 

* * * 

"When in Rome do as the Romans do" is no longer advice ; 
it's a command. — Wall Street Journal. 

Another mistake China made was in having rivers big 
enough to accommodate gunboats. — Peoria Star. 

* * * 

According to a morning paper, women are now buying their 
dresses on the installment system. We seem to have seen some 
of them wearing the first installment. — Punch. 

* * * 

Everybody seems to speak with conviction on the subject of 
crime except our juries. — Norfolk VirginianPilot. - 

* * * 

Doubtless the kangaroo was nature's first abortive effort to 
produce a cheer leader. — Palatka (Fla.) News. 

* * * 

Mussolini is hailed as a deliverer, but what Europe needs 
isn't a deliverer but a receiver. — American Lumberman. 

* * * 

A bachelor.may feel more lonely at Christmas time, but he at 
least knows when he receives a present that he won't have to 
pay for it later. — El Paso Times. 

* * * 

Women, according to a leading feminist, "are making greater 
strides then ever before." Naturally. They are less impeded 
than ever before. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

The Indian Bureau announces that the per capita wealth of 
the American Indians is $4,700. which makes them the weath- 

iest people in the world. Lo, the rich Indian. — Seattle Times. 

* * * 

By taxing the unmarried men. Mussolini apparently wants to 

foster the fighting spirit. — Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

It must be nice to be a king in a land where somebody else is 
important enough to be the target. — Rockford Star. 

* * * 

Women marry earlier than they used to, a statistician says. 
figure- with reference to frequency will be the next step. — El 

Paso Times. 

* * * 

A New Year's resolution: The next time we fall in love, it 
shall be after Christmas — not before. 

* * * 

Rugs and carpetings are now being woven from a yarn 
made from paper. I hear that an economical gentleman 
has had a beautiful buff hearth-rug made from his old in- 
come tax envelopes. — Passing Show. 

* * * 

"The average young doctor sits like Patience on a monu- 
ment waiting for clients," says a daily paper. That is bet- 
ter than having the monument on the patients. — Every- 



body's Weekly. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1927 




Pleasure's Ww 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moore. 




By Josephine Young 



New Year's Attractions 

?C/^\BEY no wand but Pleasure's," 
\J wrote Tom Moore, who has, 
for many years, introduced this column 
of the News Letter, to our readers. 

San Francisco's theaters, in full cog- 
nizance of what the public wants, have 
in the New Year attractions, thought 
wisely and well for the pleasure of their 
patrons. 

Merriment, supreme; pleasure, folly, 
entertainment, joily — these are offered 

you for New Year s. 

* * * 

Curran 

"Blossom Time" at the Curran the- 
ater will continue throughout New 
Year's week. 

"Blossom Time," one of the most de- 
lightful successes in the realm of light 
opera that San Francisco has ever en- 
joyed, returned to the Curran theater 
in this city for a single week of repre- 
sentation commencing" Sunday night, 
December 26th, but upon popular de- 
mand will continue throughout this 
coming week. This notable Franz 
Schubert operelta comes back to the 
Pacific Coast on a tidal wave of unpre- 
cedented demand. 

Since its first presentation in San 
Francisco in 1923, "Blossom Time" has 
literally conquered the world. It is 
today a reigning triumph in England. 
France, Germany, Austria, Italy, Rus- 
sia, South Africa, Australia and is now 
being prepared for production in To- 
kio, Japan. All who have seen this 
loveliest operetta of our time will need 
no urging to send them thither again — 
but to those who for one reason or an- 
other have not thus far heard and wit- 
nessed "Blossom Time," it may be 
whispered that the forthcoming en- 
gagement will prove probably the last 
opportunity to see this world-triumph- 
ant musical play with the ideal New 
York cast. 

The outstanding thing about "Blos- 
som Time" is, of course, the use of 
Franz Schubert's own matchless music 
as the superstructure, accompaniment and 
embellishment of the score. Whoever 
first thought out the idea of doing this 
was somewhat of a genius himself but 
not less interesting is the utilizat : on 
of Franz Schubert himself as the 
hero of the story. In all ways this 
lovely, musical play possesses all the 
elements that go to make the ideal pro- 



duction for the future. And, best of all, 
its f.agrant romance is eqtlisite in taste, 
even for the most discriminating the- 
atergoer. No line of vulgarity and no 
suggestion of suggestiveness or inuen- 
do mar the beauty of its glowing ac- 
tion. In the entire history of the stage 
no uiher musical play has, like "Blos- 
som Time." been obliged to present 
two companies on Broadway at one 
and the same time to house insistent 
patronage. Messrs. Shubert, its man- 
agers, admit that "Blossom Time" has 
made more money than any other pro- 
duction of its kind ever produced in 
this country, and this claim has been 
acknowledged generally on both sides 
of the Atlantic. 

Primarily a love story of serious val- 
ues, the piece is relieved by much com- 
edy ; charming dancers naturally in- 
troduced ; a host of pretty singing and 
dancing girls in the fascinating fur- 
belows of 1825, and the scenes laid in 
old Vienna are thoughtful reproduc- 
tions of the actual scenes of a century 
ago in that gayest of all European 
cities. Even the youngest chil Iren 
may see it without blush and children 
everywhere have formed, it is said, a 
considerable portion of its overwhelm- 
ing patronage, for the work is sweet 
and wholesome throughout. 

The present company is said to be 
the finest cast ever assembled for the 
preparation of this work. It has been 
made up by Mr. J. J. Shubert personal- 
ly from the first choice artists from all 
of the four companies who have ren- 
dered the work on Broadway. The 
roster includes such splendid acting 
and singing personalities as Henry E. 
Dixey, the renowned comedian ; Knight 
MacGregor as Franz Schubert; Pat- 
rick J. Kelly, a former tenor of the San 
Carlo Opera Company ; two prima 
donnas from the realm of grand opera 
in the persons of Miss Mary Powell 
and Miss Leeta Corder. Others of 
prime importance are the Messrs. Reg- 
inald Carrington, Zachary Caully, 
Henry Robke, John V. Abbott, John E. 
Wheeler and the Misses Alexandra 



■THE MIRACLE" 



Civic Audi'orhipi. Final 
Perfnrm-Mirc. Jnn. in. 
K'e'y Evfnlnc ET«"*pt 
Slinrt-yH. >1-tlm-t's Silt, 
n n (1 Wed. S I a r I , 
P -ot*-|i«fy lit R l». 111. 
nml 2 p. m. I inly D'-»nn 
Mltnno- n, Ellnii- Pnt- 
tcrKitn, Irl.s Tree. 



Amusements 

NF.XT WKRK 



ON THE STAGE 



rtI.CAV.AIt 

O'Fnrrell nr, Powell 



''The Home Towneri*,* 

Geo. Cohan'N Fa.ce. 



COLCMRIA 
TO Eddy Street 



"They Knew What 
'» hey Wanted,*' 
Richa il Uennett. 



ccrrax 

Geary nr. Ma*nn 



••nioMKom Time." Ex- 
tended En gage in en t 
Th.HHci'k Oniy. Benu- 
\llul Opeietta. 



I \PITOL 

i : Hi- nr. Stockton 



PHESIDKNT 
HcAlllMer nr. >ik(. 



i "Carter the Great." 

> Engagement FihIm 
_J Sunday Night. _ 

1 "The Little Spitfire,' 

> New \ r:ir's OtYclng, 
J Hi my Dully Comedy. 



W ILKES 

Geary nt MnMiin 



J 



"Queen High," 
Kolli and Dill. 
Fln.il Week. 



VAUDEVILLE 



filH.DE> GATE 
G. G. Ave. A: Taylor 



OIIPUEITM 
O'Farrell & Powell 



Jen 7 and Her Dahy 

G nndcN; C la ra hel le 

i D a r r c 1 1 , l'haiii|iloni 

Sw Inline. ; <»M id n igft I 

Louth," Anna MKmhi. 

i mi r Bexdllneiv: Rae 

Samuel*, Happy Songst 

G.acclta and Theodore, 

Dance .SeiiNa.ion; WIN 

|l-»ui iiiM* .to.- unniL' 

"Quiet, PleaNe", Owem 

...eulive. e>'. 1'ioleiiii 

Ad.or. 



PAXTAGES(NEW) 

Market at Hyde 



JnmcN J. Corhett, For- 
mer Pug ili.si : Gurnldlne* 
Miller, "PniUlnii Ada- 
gio '; Bonhnlr 
AerobaiH. 



I MO\ SQUARE 
O'Farrell nr. Powell 



> Vau 



dcvlllc-Plcturea 



V* IGW AM 
MImkIoii and I'.ml 



\ a n lie \ Ille-Piclurca 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 



CAM FOR MA 

Market at 4111 



CAMEO 
Market opp. uth 



"The Devil Horse.' 
Featuring Rev, t n « 
Ho i He oi item a- kable 

Intelligence. 

"Three Had Men" W II 
Be Sc.eened All Week 
Geo ge O'Brien, Oilv« 
Ilu den, Lou Tellegen 
Rep nductlonM of Fam. 
oils Pain IngN Done Ir 
Color. 



CASINO 

Fills at Mason St. 



Change of Popular 

Pieluri's. 



GRA.VADA 

Market nt Jonen St. 



"Hotel Imperial," 
l*i. hi Negri. 



IMPERIAL 
Market ln-l. <Jlh-7th 



ST. FRANCIS 
Market hel. *>ih~<lih 



WARFIELD 

Market nr. Taylor 



"Michael StrogolV." 
Powe fu> Drama* 

JuleM_Vcine. 

"Sorroffi of Satan. 1 

Adolphe Menjou. Rl 

tard ■ Cor*e», Carol 

DcnipNter. 

""Twinkle! nen," Colleei 

Moore. Fanehon ant 

Marco, \ew Ycar'N 

"Idea." 



UP TOWN 



Al.HAMBRA 

(New) 

Polk and Green 



"The Whole Town" 
Tj-lkhtg." Sn\. Jnn. 1 
"Pe-ch of the Devil, 
Sun.. Mae RpncIi. Pa 
O'Mall^y. "The Lily 
Von- Tuck Wed.. Hell 
R#it»etr. "Don Junn'f 
NlghtH." LewlM Stoi 
Shirley Motion. 



January 1, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Dagtnar, Erba Robeson, Sioux Nedra, 
Heien btone, Mane Kickatd and Louise 
Rothaker, the premiere danseuse. 

* * * 
Wilkes 

Kolb and Dill will continue at the 
Wilkes theater in "Queen High'' where 
the famous comedians have been draw- 
ing large crowds bringing their suc- 
cessful engagement to a close with the 
conclusion ot this coming week's per- 
formances. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

George Cohan's latest comedy, "The 
Home lowneis" rich in humor and 
character drawing will continue on at 
the Alcazar through JNew \ear s week. 

There are seven scenes in the play 
with action and mirthful situations pre- 
dominating. Such a piay naturaly re- 
quires a stellar cast which Henry Duf- 
fy has provided for the Alcazar pro- 
duction. 

* * * 

President 

"1 he Little Spitfire," cheery comedy 
at the President, begins its third week 
at the matinee Sunday. Acclaimed as 
one of the hits of the season here, also, 
as it has proved a success on broad- 
way where it is still playing. 

Henry Duffy believes tnat he has 
chosen well the cast to interpret this 
very funny play from the pen of Myion 
C. Eagin, in bringing to the President 
a group of players, several of whom 
have not been seen here in a long time. 

The play abounds in laughter. It ■ 
contains interesting episodes and smart 
dialogue and its characters are well 

Brawn. 

* * * 

California 

"The Devil Horse" will be screened 
at the California theater commencing 
Slew Year's week and featuring Rex, 
the wonderful horse of rcmarkahle in- 
telligence. Circling wagon trains, In 
dians, an d the flare Oi lire arms are 
part of the exciting photoplay with al- 
wavs the famous horse in a starring 
place. 

"The Sherwoods" provide musical 
Clumbers and have planned an unusual 
midnight show on New Year's Eve, fol- 
lowed b] subsequent New Year's daj 
selections. 

* * * 

Warfield 

Colleen Moore, starring in "Twinkle- 
will l>c the attraction at Loew's 
\\ arfield theater, for the week starting 
Saturday, January 1. 1927, in which 
the fascinating young star is declared 
to appear in one of her outstanding 
roles. 

"1 lance Poems" is announced as the 
Fane lion and Marco idea for this pro- 
gram. Carlos and Jinette. Aida Kawa- 
katni. "Pavlowa of Japan": Marguerite 



Shawl, William Richie and the Sunkist 
Beauties appear in the spectacular feat- 
ures with special attention given to 
New Year's day and its celebration. 

* * # 
Alhambra 

The beautiful new Alhambra on Polk 
street near Green, will, on New Year's 
Day, Saturday, January 1, screen "The 
Whole Town's Talking" with Edward 
Everett Horton and Virginia Lee Cor- 
bin the stars. As an additional attrac- 
tion, the Alhambra will also show 
"Honest Injun," a comedy feature with 
Johnny Arthur the star. 

Mae Busch and Pat O'Malley will be 
on the screen Sunday, January 2, in 
"Perch of the Devil" a picture of dar- 
ing romance, thrills and a combat of 
jealous hearts. Comedy, scenic news 
and short reels are programmed. 

"The Lily," a William Fox presenta- 
tion will occupy the Alhambra screen, 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 
with Belle Bennett, star of "Stella Dal- 
las" as the heroine supported by Rich- 
ard Tucker, Ian Keith in a stage drama 
of sister love. 

"Don Juan's Three Nights" claims 
the screen at the Alhambra theater 
Thursday and Friday, January 6-7 with 
Lewis Stone and Shirley Mason the 
leading lights in a dashing story of 
genius. 

Walter Rudolph and his melody mas- 
ters provide some of the best music to 

be heard in town. Musical numbers of 
unusual charm played exquisitely un- 
der the baton of Rudolph certainly af- 
ford patrons of the Alhambra an eve- 
ning of rare enjoyment. 

* * * 
St. Francis 

" I he Sorrows of Satan," filmed Iroin 

the novel bj Mane Corelli, re-opened 
the St. Francis on Christmas day and 
will continue throughout this week. 
Coming direel from New Y'oik where 
it is now playing at $2 prices. 1). W. 
ith's big film had its premiere at 
the St. Francis outside of Broadway 

and on Market street the picture is 

being shown at popular prices. 

Adolphe Menjou portrays what has 
been declared the most important role 
of his career, lie is Satan in the pic- 
ture. 

Carol Dempster has the feminine 
Lya de I'utti of "Varieties" fame 
has an important part and Ricardo Cor- 
tez certainly has a characterization far 
and away from his usual portrayals. 
The picture is too go. id to Bi 

* * * 
Pantages 

A New Year's Jamboree will be 
1 at Pantages theater with ten 
LCts including Babe Ruth and 
lames J. Corbett with a midnight per- 
formance added to the other perform- 
ance of the day. 



Imperial 

The Imperial theater will stage a 
"Midnight Show" New Year's Eve. 
Jules \ erne's "Michael Strogoff" 
which had such a popular run in the 
book world supplies the screen attrac- 
tion. 

Ivan Moskine has the featured role 
of Strogoff. Nathalie de Kovanko, a 
beautiful blonde, is the heroine. The 
barbaric scenes are entrancing and the 
picture as a whole-distinctive. 

# # * 
Orpheum 

The Orpheum theater will have an- 
other joyous bill for the week begin- 
ning this Saturday, (New Y'ear's Day) 
with four big headline attractions and 
supported by other big feature acts. 

These four headliners will include a 
triumphant return of Rae Samuels, 
"The Blue Streak of Vaudeville," in a 
new program of happy songs with Mil- 
dred Land at the piano ; Gracella and 
Theodore, a new dance sensation, pre- 
senting a most colorful affair called 
(Continued on Page 14) 




NEW ORLEANS) 

To better serve our many friends and patrons 

over '300,00000 has been expended in recon- 

smiction and rehabilitation to maintain this 

famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels 

The large wll ventilated hujh criingrooms 
have been retained and modernized'*""- 

ACCOMM0EW1N0 OVER 1000 GUESTS 

Send for Descriptive Hotel Folder 

TJlustratal MardHiras Pr^ram for the asking 

Alfred S . Aimer and CO-itd. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA 

'Vickit Offices of jinnns-pcrlAtian lino in lobby 




CLUB 
Auto Service Co, 

Harry A. Fialer. Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing- - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxlcab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



585 Post St. 
San Francisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1927 






By Antoinette Arnold 



Happy New Year ! 

WHAT a world of expectancies encompasses the old 
salutation— Happy New Year! With whole-hearted 
inclination we reiterate the greeting to each and every one. 
May this be the best year you have ever known. Why 
not? For hope and expectancy are the substance on which 
we build. Authorities on statistical reckoning; experts on 
human analvses ; preachers and teachers assure us that the 
world is better than it has ever been— in many ways ; and 
so why not hug tight the optimisms we treasure? 
So — out with it — and be glad! 
New Year — 1927. 
"How do you do?" 

* * * 
Society Surges Toward Brilliancy 

Criterions for brilliancy have been established by many 
memorable events recently in the society realms of the city 
and peninsula set. 

The magnificent ball given by Mrs. Tobin Clark for her 
daughter, Miss Virginia Patrician Clark, at their residence, 
"El Palomar," in San Mateo, is still being discussed in 
society as the most beautiful of all affairs. 

The charming young debutante made her bow to society 
under the most elegant conditions, amid the bowers of lavish 
beauty; and set firmly in society's firmament a new star in 

exquisite achievements. 

* * * 

Good to Be Home 

To hear Lillian Birmingham tell it, there is no city in the 
world like dear old San Francisco. 

Mrs. Birmingham has just returned from a transconti- 
nental tour, visiting her famous daughter, Alma Birming- 
ham, the pianist, in Chicago; and other relatives in New 
York City, Philadelphia and Washington, D. C. 

"The best way to appreciate this gorgeous city," said 
Airs. Birmingham, "is to take a trip now and then and see 
some other places in our own America." 

In speaking of other cities, where she was extensively 
entertained by foremost musical associations and society 
circles, the well known contralto singer voiced her re- 
avowed loyalty to the city of the Golden Gate. 

"New York has no sky," said Mrs. Birmingham. "It has 
a skyline of towering buildings that point their way toward 
the clouds, but one can not see the sky — the buildings are 
all in the way. 

"Look!" and the singer of rich, rare tones, pointed up 
toward the blue and orchid-pink of our California skies — 
"Look, did you ever see a picture one-half as handsome as 
that? That is the sky — the sky as we have it almost even- 
day in San Francisco — and the best of all, we can actually 
see it, if we only want to." 

During her visit to easte-n centers, Mrs. Birmingham 
made an intensive study of musical organizations, "their 
methods, their procedure and looked into the best known 
works of prominent composers, whose songs she will in- 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

On [he Co.il Hijhw.j. H.lfw.y Between San Franeiico and Ua Angela 

An Inn of I'nujual Excellence 

IPira or writm for reicriaiiont on your next trip loulh 



elude in her new repertoire for concert or other professional 
appearances. 

she was the center of admiration among the musicians of 
the cities she visited and came home wii.h many advanced 
ideas regarding her chosen professional work. Mrs. Bir- 
mingham has a way of finding the best const, uctive plans 
among those with whom she associates. Her own brilliancy 
of mind and her mastery of music make her an authority of 
unusual reckoning. 

Mrs. Biimingham is past president of the California State 
Federation of Music, a member of the Piesidents' Council 
and also a member of the Gene.al Federation Board. 

Her attainments, as president of the California Federa- 
tion have had no peer in point of membership enrollments 
and the widespread interest in mattes musical. 

She is president of the Sorosis Club and a past president 
of the San Francisco Musical Club, cotnp.ising one of the 
distinguished musical groups of the entire nation. 

* * * 
New Years' Parties 

Many homes in San Francisco will observe the old-time 
custom of keeping open house New Year's Day. 

Society folks in the bay cities and down the peninsula 
have taken hold of the former observances and have issued 
invitations to coteries of friends of "open house" from three 
to seven. 

It is refreshing to receive the pretty invitations — and to 
recognize the social amenity of by-gone days. 

* * * 
Salon Des Artistes 

Mrs. William Beckman, author, world traveler and phil- 
osopher, has just sent out some beautiful invitations to her 
Salon Des Artistes, which will have its inaugural event on 
the evening of January eighth, at the Stewart Hotel. 

Mrs. Beckman tells us that she is planning to recognize 
the literary and musical attainments of both men and 
women during the season of her Salon Des Artistes. Not 
long ago she gave a beautiful dinner party in the rose room 
of the Stewart Hotel, assembling on that occasion many 
well known writers, vocalists, composers and prominent 
people from the banking world. 

During the progress of dinner each guest called upon to 
speak gave some outline of current literature, many paying 
homage to the hostess and her contributions to the realm of 
books. She has written something like seven or eight books 
on her travels, which have been published in California. 

Composers play their original selections ; musicians sing, 
and every guest at the dinner gatherings of Mrs. Beckman's 
Salon Des Artistes contributes in some way to the bril- 
liancy of the affair. The hostess, herself, always adds luster 
to the occasion by giving encouraging philosophy in her 
usual whole-souled manner, sparkling with wit and enter- 
taining information on literature in the city which she chooses 
to make her home. 

Mrs. Beckman is prominently identified with Sacramento 
society and has, for many years, been a leading literary 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

050 Bu.h Street, Detnreen Potvcll and Stockton, Son Frnnel.co 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 1, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



light in events at the Capital. Her husband, 
the late William Beckman, was one of the dis- 
tinguished bankers of Sacramento, where for a 
number of years the Beckmans made their 

home. 

* * * 

New Year's Day 

Mr. and Mrs. William Loller will keep open- 
house at their residence on Scott Street, today, 
January first, having issued handsome invita- 
tions for the event and designating the hours 
from three to seven. 

"Lest we forget ye old-time custom," reads 
the radiant invitation, to which are attached 
the names of Mrs. Rosetta Baker, Mrs. Adolph 
Seibrecht and Mrs. Benjamin A. Blair. 

* * * 

Pasadena Debutante Is the Guest 
at Christmas Luncheon 

Miss Bessie Bailey of Pasadena was the 
honor guest at a luncheon given Christmas 
Day at the Fairmont Hotel in the Venetian 
dining room, with members of her own family 
and other visitors. 

Miss Bailey motored up from Pasadena in company with 
her mother and her sister, Jean, visiting her sister, Mrs. 
Lucille Davis, of this city, over the holidays. They returned 
to their Pasadena home on Monday. 

* * * 
At Lake Tahse 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wallace Mein are at their Lake 
Tahoe place for the holidays and are entertaining a group 
of young people. Miss Dorothy Mein, who was taken to 
Paris by her mother last summer, is enjoying her holiday 
vacation from school on the Riviera. 

Mrs. Wickham Havens is entertaining a house party of 
young people at Lake Tahoe over the holidays in honor of 
her son, Walker Havens, and his bride, Miss Eleanita Raw- 
lings, and Edward Engs, whose marriage will be an event 
of the coming year, are also among the guests, also Mrs. 
Edward W. Engs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Rawlings are in Southern Califor- 
nia and will remain until after the New Year. They will 
attend the Stanford-Alabama game at Pasadena on New 
Year's Day. 

* * * 

To Hold Ouen Hcuse 

Mr. and Mrs. James King Steele will hold open house' on 
New Year's Day from 4 to 6 o'clock. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Lawrence Nelson will hold a reception 
today, from 1 until 5 o'clock p. m., at their handsome home 
in \ allejo street. The Nelsons are associated with an open- 
hearted hospitality which is typically Southern in its atmos- 
phere, and the fortunate gue^ is always sure of a cordial 




iiojioi, t'.wi'icitiimti" 

750 Sutler Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Itooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



least one member of the audience liked it bet- 
ter for its simplicity. Mile. Marvin was a 
fragile and palpitating butterfly." 

Mile. Marvin appeared at the Christy Ma- 
thewson benefit in Boston at the Metropolitan 
Theater, where she and M. Arshansky had 
been chosen to represent the Mordkin Ballet 
Russe. They danced the Russian doll dance, 
"Wanyka Tanyka," which, according to the 
Utica Daily Press, had to do with two dolls 
and their daily dozen, much to the delight of 
the audience. 

* * * 
Engaged 

Announcement has been made of the engage- 
ment of Miss Eleanor Smallwood Turner, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Turner of San 
Francisco, and Lieutenant Lloyd Kenneth 
Forster, United States Navy. 

Miss Turner is a graduate of Miss Hamlin's 
schools. 

Lieutenant Forster is attached to the U. S. 
Flagship Seattle. He is the son of Mr. and 
A. A. Forster of Milwaukee. 
The engagement was announced at a tea given at the 
Palace Hotel by the future bride and her sister, Mrs. Ed- 
mund Lee Mervin, in honor of Mrs. Percy Francis Gar- 
diner. 

* * * 

Winter Sports Attract Society 

Social activities and winter sports at Lake Tahoe will at- 
tract many people to Tahoe Tavern and at other resorts 
along the marvelous lake over New Year's. Many residents 
of the lake are re-opening their homes for the events, hav- 
ing groups of guests for the week-end. 

Among those who will enjoy the supper dance and ball at 
the tavern on New Year's Eve are Mr. and Mrs. Herbert 
Fleishhacker. Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Ghirardelli, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Brockway Metcalf, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Oliver, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. D. Pischel, Dr. and Mrs. W. E. Stevens, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. R. Westphal, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Brandt, Mr. 
and Mrs. R. L. Shurtleff, Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Dover, Mr. 
and Mr>. L. M. Ballson. Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Volkmann, 
Mr. and Airs. Leon Roos, Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Bliss. Miss 
Marion Huntington. Mrs. Wickham Havens, Mr. Walter 
S. Heller, Mr. Sidney Khrman, Mr. and Mrs. George E. 
Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Zane and their daughters, 
the Mioses Mary and Margaret Zane; Mr. and Mrs. William 
Cavalier, Mr. and Mrs. William Magee. Mr. and Mrs. Pren- 
tiss Cobb Hale and Prentiss Hale, Jr., Dr. and Mrs. Harry 
I'.. Alderson. 

* * * 

Miss Reva Olive Oakes entertained a coterie of friends at 
a prettily appointed Tea given in Laurel Court at the Fair- 



welcome and a most pleasant time on every occasion of a niont Hotel. The round table at which the bevy of girls 



n'sit witli these pleasant host 

San Francisco Artist 

Mile. Virginia Marvin of San Francisco, a most talented 
girl, well known in San Francisco and the bay cities, will 
appear here witli the Mordkin Ballet Russe, much to the 
delight of her many friends and former pupils, who are glad 
to know that her art as a dancer has attracted the attention 
of critics during her tour with the Mordkin dancers. 

The Evening Star of Washington, D. C. said of Mile 
Marvin's dancing: "One young American girl whose danc- 
ing had unusual individuality and who suggested a bit of 
the Ann Pennington of other days in her buoyancy, sauci- 
ness and attractiveness was Mile. Virginia Marvin." 

The critic of the Rending Times Pennsylvania, of No- 
vember 2, 1926, said: "The Butterfly" was chorfosrraphical- 
ly much simpler than the ordinary 'danse de papillon' and at 



were seated had for a centerpiece a large basket of Russell 
roses. Corsage bouquets for each guest and tall blue can- 
dles in gold candlesticks completed the decorations. The 
favors were a diminutive Santa Claus holding the place 
cards, whose design was two cupids in a golden diamond 
rint;. hinting at the announcement of Miss Oakes' engage- 
ment which followed, to Mr. Lloyd Edward Simpsor 
of Mr. C. I. Simpson, the vice-president of the Nash Motor 
Car Co.. and Mrs. Simpson of San Francisco. Miss Oakes. a 
graduate oi Miss Hamlin's School, is the daughter of Mrs. 
Anne Bennett, who is leaving shortly for Europe. The 
wedding will take place during the winter. The members 
oi the party included Mioses Helene Gardner. Mfrrion 
Catherine Babst. Constance Ramaccot'i. Muriel Macfarlane. 
Adrienne Charmak. Carlma Dorn. Virginia Casey. Jean 
(Continued on Page 18) 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 



Radio Interference Filter 

RADIO interference from household 
motors — as on oil burners in 
apartment houses, under-grate blow- 
ers, electric refrigerators and elevators 
— has been the source of widespread 
annoyance. Another cause of radio in- 




C. J. Penning <un 

terference even more troublesome at 
times — is sub-stations with rotary 
transformers, trolley cars and other 
large pieces of power electrical equip- 
ment. The third class — the worst of- 
fenders of all — are the various types of 
electrical apparatus which cause high- 
frequency disturbances on a large scale, 
such as violet-ray machines, X-ray ma- 
chines, electrostatic dust separators, 
etc. 

By far the largest class is the first. 
that of household appliances, and it is 
to the reduction of this type of radio 
interference that the Tobe Deutsch- 
mann Company is at present address- 
ing itself. 

In its Radio interference filter No. 1. 
the Tobe Deutschmann Company pre- 
sents a small and compact piece of 
equipment for use with household ap- 
pliances using motors up to and includ- 
ing one-quarter horse power. This 
covers the usual range of electric re- 
frigerators and oil burners. 

In all cases the interference filter 
should be placed as close to the offend- 
ing motor as possible. The leads to 
the brushes should be cut as close as 
possible to the motor and the filter 
placed in the line. At one end of the 
filter there are three leads — the two 
outer of these should be connected one 
each to two brushes — the center lead 
should be connected to the frame of 
the motor, by placing it under a bolt, 
the under side of which has been 
scraped bright, and which is then tight- 



ly screwed into the frame. Some con- 
venient point of attachment can always 
be found on the motor frame. The 
leads at the other end of the interfer- 
ence filter are then connected to the 
line going into the motor, taking pains 
, that leads on corresponding sides are 
properly connected so as not to change 
the polarity, in the case of a d. c. motor. 

When the ruling of the Department 
■ if Justice let down the bars last July 
there were about 560 stations on the 
air. Today there are 621 and more 
going on the air regularly. Warning 
was broadcast by the Department of 
Commerce that all available space in 
the ether was occupied. Today it is 
more than occupied. 

The annoyance in the ether continues 
to grow worse. This disturbance, which 
began in the lower wavelength bands, 
has gradually crept up to the higher 
waves, so that today reception from 
any broadcast station is anything but 
a pleasure. 

Letters received show that in many 
cases listeners are discouraged with 
listening-in and scarcely turn on their 
sets longer than to listen to some spe- 
cial broadcast. Some have even be- 
come so thoroughly discouraged as to 
disconnect their sets entirely, and with 
no intentions of resuming listening-in 
until the ether is clear of congestion. 

To give an idea of the state of affairs, 
some waves are carrying the programs 
of 12 or more stations and naturally 
this produces the whistles we now hear. 

The other evening the listening pub- 
lic were favored with another new and 
powerful station coming on the air lo- 
cally. It came on the air in between 
two already very powerful as well as 
popular stations, and if the program 
heard from this station is a criterion of 
what we are to have in the future, we 
doubt very much as to the popularity 
this station will attain. The program 
was indeed below the class of programs 
which should come from such a station. 

If other pirate stations are to follow 
in the same path, we sincerely hope 
that Congress comes out of its slum- 
bers long enougrh to take such pirates 
off the air for all time. 

We are aware however, that the gen- 
eral public is with us to the man, and 
we know that such actions on the part 
of any station is going to be reflected 
on the radio industry. If a set owner 
refuses to listen and those who are not 
set owners refuse to buy, what is to 
become of the radio business? 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO^»28.3 

Sunday. Jauuaiy - 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
nun-sec, arian cltu.ch Service, 

10-45 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

2:45 to 4:15 p. m. — Concert of the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion ui /iiiau He. lz, u.uau-ast oy avFO, 
KUO and KPI. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

6:3o p. m. — General information. 

C:35 to 8.35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

S:35 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

Monday, January 3 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m.— Daily Health Drill. 

10:10 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:011 noun — Time signals, Scripture reading 
ami weather forecast. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchest! a. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 tu 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock ma. ket quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchesti a. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — DX. 

S : c ' i to > : 1 ll p. m. — Book reviews. 

8:10 tn 8:20 p. m. — Chamber of Commerce 
Talk. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — KFI and KPO broadcast- 
ing simultaneously. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Mandarin Cafe Orchestra. 

11 tn 12:00 ii. m. — KPO Vniiety Hour. 

Tuesday* Jnnnnry -S 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Dally Health Drill. 

loii a. m. — "ui-inK hints and recipes. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

m. — stuck ma, ket quotations, 
m. — States Restaurant Orches- 



Falrmont Hotel Orchestra. 

-DX. 

■Program by Uda Waldrop. 

-Progiam featuring Gypsy 



6:15 to 6:30 p 

6:30 to 7:00 p. 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. 

9:00 to ln:il0 p. m 
and Marta. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Wednesday, Jnnuiiry 5 

6:46, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Dally Health Drill 

In. in a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

ln:3n a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:15 a. m. — Hume Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 0:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

fi-is; tn r-sn p, m — s*nr>k ma k ' nunrations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:l)ii tu 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7-Sn tn s-fll p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

0:00 to 10:011 p. m. — Musical pogram. 

I0:oo to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

Thursday. January • 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 

i"-ii a. m. — "nni-inc: hints pnd recipes. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

12:00 noun — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 1 
chestra 

1:00 to 2:011 p. m. — Fairmont Hutel Concerlffl 
o -chest '-a. 

3:3" ... k-30 p. m. — Palacp Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. _ 



January 1, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



6:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

0:1:- io 6:30 p. m. — Stock ma.ket quotations. 

6:30 to 7:0u p. m. — Slates Kestau.ant O.cnes- 

ira. 
7:0ti to 7:30 p. m. — Fahmont Hotel Concert 

Orciiest. a. 
7:3U to &:UU p. m. — DX. 
v - 'in to y :UU p. m. — Program featuring the 

KPO Stiing Quai tci 
9:0n to 10*00 P (.pram hv the Ha-mnnv Four. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Cabirla Cafe Orchestra. 

Friday, Jnntiniy 7 

6:45, 7:15, 7:-15 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 

10:io a. m. — UooKing hints and recipes. 

1U.3U a. m. — U. S. Wi-ailier lo.ecasu 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion 'laiu. 

in ;., a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

11!:0U noon — lime signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:3(1 to ^:t.0 p. m. — *'aii monc ±-i olei Lonccit 
Oi chestra. 

m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 



3:30 to 5:30 p. 

chestra. 
6:30 to G:15 p. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. 

ira. 
7:00 to 7:30 p 



m. — Children's hour. 

ni. — biuCK ma k.i quotations. 

m. — States Restauiant Oicnes- 



-Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

B:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Cabiria Cafe Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chesti a. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Restauiant Or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, January S 

6:46, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 

10"1'> a. m. — ' unuinp- hi^ts and recipes. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

K;UU noon — lime signals and Sc. ipture read- 
ing. 

l:lo to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchest. a. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to d:30 p. m, — Stock ma' ket quotations. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — States Restauiant Orches- 
tra. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KFW1— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 250 

Sumlny, January 2 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

6:30 to 7:50 p. m. — Sandy's Franciscans Dance 

Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Services broadcast from 

Fifth Churcn of Ch 1st Scientist. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Laura Ellen Winsor's 

pupils. 

Monday, January 3 

1 .nil to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu Studio pro- 
gram. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Gladys La Mai r. 

I 80 i" 7:30 p. ni. — Jell-X-Cill program. 

jj nn to 9:00 p. m. — Studio p.og.am. 

1:00 to 10.00 p. m. — Imp.omptu Studio pro- 
gram. 

Tuesday. January -5 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 
B:00 i" '":::n p, m. — B< nontei and 

Doris Halcom. 
|:30 to 7;3o p. m. — Orpheus Girls Dance Or- 

nhfst n 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Louis -md Jerome 

McMillan. 
8:30 to i»;uO p. m. — lonaco with Gaylord Wll- 

shirc, 
9:C0 to lo:oo p. m. — Vera Tulagln's pupils. 

\\ t iim-Mdity, January 5 

1:00 to 2:00 p. ni. — Impromptu Studio Pro- 
Bra in, 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Bill Bennett and Doris 

l l.ilcom. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Jell-X-Cell program. 
s .mi to 8:2li p. m. — Bilo Lh vh 
8:E0 to 8 30 p, m — B cker Sto ace p-ogrnm. 
■S80 to 10:00 p. m.— Tom Cat meeting. 

Thursday, Januai7 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio pro- 

c -am. 
6:00 to f.:30 p. m. — Studio. 
6:30 to 7:80 p. m — Har.y's Callfornlans 

8:00 to £:80 p, m. — Heniy Hair.. in tenor. 
.i p m — p't- s n»iH School, 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, Jnmimy 7 

]-nn to 2*00 p, m — Tmp*'«mptn studio pmernm. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Billy Devlne and Alberta 
Woi den. 

Tell-X-Cell Prog-am. 

■ 8 30 p. m. — Ben Llpston. ly lc tenor. 
8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — lonaco" with C.avlord 
Wilahlre. 



9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
Satuidny, January S 

1:00 to 3:00 a. m. — KFWI Pajama Party. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Dally Cxeept Sunday 

9.00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 



KGTT — GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FHANC18CO— 207 
Sunday, January 2 

2:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Sunday school. 
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Temple seivice. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Evening service. 

Monday, January 3 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 

Tuesday, January 4 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily scripture reading. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio progiam. 

Wednesday, January 7i 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily scripture reading. 
2:30 to 4:00 p. m. — Divine healing service. 
ti:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio piog.am. 

Thursday. Jnmiaiy 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Daily scripture reading. 

Friday, January 7 

12:10 to 12:30 p. m. — Dailv scripture reading 

S.00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio p.og.am. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sunshine hour. 

Saturday^ January S 

Ls:iu to I2:3u p. in. — Daily scripture reading. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 
Sunday, January 2 

1 1 :od ;i. m. — i'i st Congregational Church ser- 

\ Ice, Sa n Francisco. 
i:oo ]>. ni — Vesper Service, Grace Cathedral, 

San FYancisco. 

6 .' to i 30 p. in. — Bem'S Symphony Orches- 

i . a, 
7:30 p. m. — Weather bureau report. 
7:35 p. m. — First Congi egational Church ser- 

\ Ice, San Francisco. 
'.ton to 10:oO p. m. — Bern's Symphony Orches- 

i iM. 

Monday, January 3 

L:30 p. in — N. v. stuck reports. 

1 :37 p. in. — S. V. SlOCk reports. 

l r I j 1 1. in. — Weather Bureau reports. 

8:00 i" *:00 p. m, — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

l no to 5:00 p. ni. — California Federation of 

Women's Clubs. 
5:30 to 6 00 p. m. — Aunt Betty (Ruth Thomp- 
KGO Kiddles' Klub. 

i d. m. — Hem s Little Symphony 
p. m. — News Items. 
; 03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

m- s !■'. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Uei i 

7 li p .in. — X. v stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. in.— S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Tuesday Jnnuai ) 

1 30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:81 p, m— S F. Stock repurts. 

i IS p. ni — Weather Buieau reports. 

tnington Concert. 
1:00 p. ni. — Housekeeper's chat. 

ms Little Symphony. 
C:55 p. m. — News items. 
*:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

m - S i Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
M. i . 
7:14 p. m. — N*. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:81 p m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 
Pi'grlms.*' 

. m.. — "ChatS About New Books.' 

WcidnrsJaTi January 5 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

3 37 p. m . — S F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m, — Weather Bureau reports. 

m — BTous ohat. 

5;30 p m — -For instance." by General Jack- 
is fi:55 p. m — Bern's Little Symphony, 
items. 
7:08 p. m — Weather Bureau reporL 
7:06 p. m — S. P. Produce, Grain, Cott/"\ and 

M ■ 
; U p m — x_ y. Stock reports fclnsir. /. 
7 ;i p m R, F. Stock rppo-ts fc'rs 

m — iS F studio) Farm Program. 
ni. — (Scries) "The Cattle Industry.* 



.ancina 

onJopo'theWoM J 





San Francissco's smarted rendezvous . . , 
where Cddh Harkness and h';s Orchestra have 
■won the hearts of the city 's smart set! 

TEA T>ANSANTr Monday and Saturday 

Afternoons, four 'til six. One Dollar. 
CONCERT TZA * Tucs.. Wed.. Thur., Fri. 

Afternoons, four 'til six. Fifty Cents. 
'D/NJV^R'D/lNCCNightlyCexceptSun.) 

seven 'til nine, Tcble d'llote, Two-fifry. 

No Couvert for Dinner Gucfts. 
SUPPZR T>ANCP. t Ni c hr!y (except Sun.) 

nine 't:l one, Couvert rifcy Cents; Saa:r- 

diy, Couvert One Dollar. 

C-kint ky ViCor 




Jollow the 

Qolden c R^cid 

to Healthl 

Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 6:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



January 1,1927' 



8:20 p. m. — An Interview with the Agricul- 
tural Economist 

S:3o p. m. — w.*-». ^.Male Trio. 

S:40 p. m. — Address. 

9:00 p. m. — Add. ess "California Fruit and 
Vegetable Standardization." 

9:15 p. m. — W. O. W. Male Trio. 

Thursday, January 6 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 

1:42 p. m. — "Weather. 

4:00 p. m. — Aunt Sammy's housekeepers' chat. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 

to Boys." 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:55 p. m. — News. 
7:0' p. m. — Weather. 
7:0b p. m. — S. F. Produce. 
7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7.14 p. m. — N. T. Stocks (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stocks (closing). 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) Light 

Opei a "Iolanthe." 
9:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Phil Lampkin's Musical 

Bears. 

Friday, January 7 

j. 1:10 a, m. — Homemaking Talk. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

4:00 p. m. — Housekeeper's chat. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:1)6 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain. Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing"). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing!. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (S. F. Studio) Program. 

Saturday, January S 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. "Weather Bureau report. 

12:33 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

12:40 p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

4:00 p. m. — Housekeeper's chat. 

S:00 p. m. — "Weekly Sport Review." 

8:15 to 9:15 p. m. — Program from the Hotel 

Leamington. 
9:15 p. m. to 1:00 a, m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's 

Band. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 

Monday, January 3 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News Broadcast. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting Lake 
Merritt Ducks. 

Tuesday. January 4 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast 

Wednesday. January ."> 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. rc. — Educational Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special progiam. 

Thursday, January 6 

7:00 to 7;30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
Friday. January 7 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
S:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Program. 
9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, January S 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast 



KFUS — GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday, January 2 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday School Les- 
son. 
4:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Sacred songs. 

Monday, January 3 

10:00 a, m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Courtesy pro?i am hv 
Ford's Toy Fair of Oakland. 

Wednesday, January 5 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
8:00 p. m. — Sacred songs. 

Thursday, January 6 

2:00 to S p. m. — Telephone or write In your 
health questions and they will be informal- 
ly discussed. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m, — Sacred variety program, 



Friday, Januaiy 7 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:0o to 3:00 p. m. — Women s Bible Study iiuur. 

S:00 p. m. — xelephone or w.ite in your health 
questions ana they will be internally dis- 
cussed. 

Saturday, January S 

1:30 to 2:30 p. m. — Children's Church Broad- 
cast. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
Fo.ecast; (bj Announcements of Churches 
for Sunday. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS. 
OAKLAND— 302.8 
Sunday, January 2 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Bible class. 

11:U0 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Chu/ch. 
7:45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 

Monday, January 3 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer.'' 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Cm.d.en's raour. 

6:3n to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to lU:0o p. m. — Selections from Operas. 

Tuesday. January 4 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5:oo to 6:U0 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 

Stamp Collectors. 
8:15 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program featuring 

the KTAB Quartet. 

Wednesday, January 5 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Child, en's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Folk Songs of all Nations. 

Thursday, January 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

Friday, January 7 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer.' 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Child en's Hour. 
7:00 to 7-30 p. m — Shopning Hour. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Soroptimist Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Goat Island Goats. 

Saturday, January S 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer.'" 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KGW- 



-MORNING OREGONIAN. PORT- 
LAND— 491.5 



Sunday. Jauunry 2 

10:55 to 12:30 p. m. — Morning services. 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

.Monday, January 3 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner c ncert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's Program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
8:00 to 9-00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday. January 4 

?:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health Exer- 
cises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:3o_p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:4:j p. m. — Utility se' v ; ce. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music 

Wednesday, January 5 

7:15 a. m — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
B:0( to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:40 p. m. — Utility service. 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — -bignt Opera Selections. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — ivGW Salon Orchestra- 

Thuisday, January 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
7:00 p. m. — Dinner Concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility Service. 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — lecture. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KGW Salon Orchestra. 

Friday, January 7 

7:15 a. m. — Selling up exercises. 

it :45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health exer- 
cises. 

10:uo to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
household helps. 

2:uo tu 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Chiia.en's p.og.am. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Weekly meeting of the 
KGW Movie Club. 

S:30 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Keep Growing Wiser Or- 
der of Hoot Owls. 

Saturday, January 8 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

will bring 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos ! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements, 
Income Tax Reports. 

Expert Auditor 

Part-time Service 

268 Market St., Room 101 







January 1, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 

(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony. Inc.) 
Sunday, January 2 

10:00 a. m. — Church Services under direction 
of L. A. Chuicn Federation. 

11:00 a. m. — Third Church of Christ .Scientist 
services. 

2:45 p. m. — Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia presents San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, Conductor; broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI, KPO, KGO. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nigntiy Doings. 

6:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat and 
Father Ricard's Sun Spot weather forecast. 

7:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital; Alex 
Reilly at the console. 

8:00 p. m. — Packai d Classic Hour. 

9:00 p. m. — Bob Bottger and his Venetians 
Dance Oichestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill 
Hennessy, Director; Dolly MacDonald, So- 
loist. 

Monday, January 3 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 

by Georgia O. George. 
10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — ■ Furnishings for the 

Home by Agnes "White. 
10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 

Medal Flour Home Service Talks, 
11:10 to 11:30 a. m.— Food Talks by Agnes 

White. 
5:20 p. m. — The Varsity Club Orchestra — Bill 

Stewart, Director. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:20 i). m. — George Wilder Cartwilght, talks 

on the Constitution. 
6:35 p. m. — Marta Evarts Orchestra, Kenneth 

Price, soloist. 
7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians 

Starke Sisters (Minnie and Maude). 
8:00 p. m. — Popular program. 
9:00 p. m. — Program of concert music. 
10:00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, January 4 

5:30 p. m. — Jack Murray's Italian Village Or- 
chestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — Dr. John T. Miller, "Human Na- 
ture Around the World." 

8:35 p. m. — Velma Wood, concert pianist. 

7:00 p. m. — Paul Howard's Quality Seren- 
ade ra, 

8:00 p. m. — Screen Artists' Quartet, Km him 
Kimmel, sopi a.no. 

9:00 p. m. — Gertrude Koehrlngj, contralto 

10:00 p. m. — Azure Musk' I'lun • L: rice IU;s- 
sell, blues singer; Betty Colston und Bill 
Pa rker, Bather Walker, pianist. 

A\ cdufMdny. January ft 

10;on to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 

bv Georgia O. George. 
10:20 to 10:40 a. m.— Talk on Child Training 

by Agnes White. 
l" in to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 

Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 
11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnes 

White. 
5:30 p. m. — Matinee program. 
6:00 p. m.-KFl Ntghtlv Doings. 
6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide 
6:20 p. m.— KFI Rndlotorlal Period 
6:36 p, m. — Vesl Pockel Period. 
7:00 p, m. — Ray Fisher's Ot iglnal Vlctoi 
?;80 p. in— Nick Harris, Detect! v.- Si 
B:00 p, m. — California Petroleum Corporation 

l 'rog i am— -V h g In ia Flohi i. 
B:00 p. m. — Semi -classical hour. 
10:00 p. m. —Sunset Instrumental Quartet— 

Dorothy Ruth Miller, pianist; Ernest Hur- 
ley, tenor. 

ThurMday, January 

|:80 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra 
6 ho p, ni. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
B i" p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
. p, m . — KFI Radiotorlal Period 

tlan's Cotton Club orchestra 
I 00 p, m. — Program by University of South- 

e r n California. 
8:00 p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 

p m. — Leslie Adams and Dean Metc-alf. 
10:00 p. m. — Johnston & Farrell's Musi 

Hour— Direction of Gene Johnston, with 
Jim, Jack and Gene Trio, including the five 
bad boys. 

Friday. January 7 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 

by Georgia O George. 

m. — Talk on furnishing for 

the home hv Agnes White. 
10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker. Gold 

M* il.n Home Service Talks. 
11:10 to 11:30 — Food Talks by Agnes White. 

am. 
1:00 p. m. — KFI Sightly Doings. 



6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Kadioto.ial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Media Hora Es- 
pagnola. 

S:uu p. in. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Alex Reil- 
ly at the console. 

9:00 p. m. — Alma Fiances Gordon, contralto. 

10:00 p. m.— Packard Ballad Hour; J. Maui ice 
Woods, baritone. 

10::io p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour — Edna 
Bilea; J. Maurice Woods, Baritone. 

Saturday, January S 

5:30 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Angeleno Ag- 

gravatoi s. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Tiavel Guide. 
6:20 p. m. — Radiotorial Period. 
6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 
7:00 p. m. — lnsti umental music. 
8:00 p. m. — Mission Bell Orchestra; Chico De 

Verde, director, Eva Olivotti, Ray Harmon 

on a piog am by the Los Angeles Soap Co. 
9:00 p. m. — Popular Program. 
10. uu p. m. — r-ncKa. d iiadio Club — Esther 

Walker, pianist; Ruth Davis, biues singer; 

Helen Guest. 
11:00 p. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic. 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

Daily Cxcept Sunday 



7:30 a. n 
8:00 a. i 

prayer. 
8:55 a. r 
9:00 a. n 
10:30 a. m.- 

day and 
12:00 m.— 
2:00 p. m. 

day. 
4:55 p. m 
5:30 p. rr 
6:00 p. m 
6:16 p. m.- 
6:30 p. m. 



—KNX Morning Gym. 

. — Inspirational talk and morning 

— Time Signals. 
— Shopping News. 
— Household Economics except Fri- 
Satui day. 

George Redmond's Orchestra. 
. — Musical progi am — except Satur- 

— Market reports. 

— Geoige Redmond's Orchestra. 

—The Town Tattler. 

W. F. Alder Tiavelogue. 

Atwater Kent orchestra. 



Sunday, January 2 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

6:30 p. in. — t i. si L) nlui. lan Li.«.rc.i.' 

7:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

8:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature Progi am. 

Monday. January 3 

B:00 p. m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
ly wood. 
1:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
7:30 p. m. — P.aykt. 
8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy prog. am. 
11:00 p. m. — tius Ainheim's Orchestra 

Tuesday* January -I 

3:00 p. m. — Combined program by Police and 

Fire Depts. 
4 ;00 P. ni. — Louise Howatt, contralto 
p, m. — Courtesy program. 
m. — Featuie piogiiim. 
8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra 

W rdnrxday, January 5 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 
7:00 p. m — Courtesy piogram. 
p. m. — Feature program. 



8:00 



-Cru»tesy p rg am. 



9:00 p. m. — Feature program 
nx— Feat 

11:00 p. m. — Gus 



j,vv %l. ill. 1 cafcuiw |ji vb><*>». 

10:00 p. m. — Featuie p.og.am. 

'■• Ainheim's Orchestra. 



Thursday. January 

11:00 a m. — Nature talk. 

7 on p. m. — Oigan reclial by Fred Scholl. 

8:00 p. m. — Corduroy Tire Co.. Inc. Courtesy 

progi am. 
9 00 to 10:00 P m. — Feature program. 
10:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra 

Friday. January 7 

3 00 p. m.— Musical p*-og-am. 

p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

p, m. — Feature program. 

p m. — Feature program. 
9 ;00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

p. m. — Feature piogram. 
1100 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra 



Saturday, January S 

3:00 p. m. — 1 he Town Crier of the Day and 
his pals. 

7:uu p. iu. — Stories of insect life. 

7:16 p. m. — Announcement ot Sunday ser- 
vices of the leading Los Angeles churches. 

7:30 p. m. — Coui lesy piogiani. 

8:00 p. m.— Featuie program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature progi am. 

10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Saturday night frolic from the 
studio of KNX. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS. t HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Sunday, January 2 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Monday, January 3 

6:00 to 6:00 p. ni.— Children's Hour. 

b:uu to r ( :uu p. m. — uiuiiur Hour Concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
spe sed with musical numbers. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

ti:uo to 9:uu p. m. — Prog. am featuring Ken- 
neth Gillum, popular songs. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Bill Hatch and His Or- 
chestra. 

10:iu p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tuesday, January 4 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

t»0J lo 7:t,u p. in. — juinner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
snei sed with musical numbei s. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Fran- 
ces St. George, blues. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News Items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Program featuring Ken- 
neth Gillum. 

9:10 to lu:l0 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his Or- 
chestra. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wvdnexday, January 5 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

(>:(Ji) to 7:lU p. m. — limner hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sun- 
shine. 

7:0u to 7:50 p. m. — Announcements Inter- 
spe sed with musical mimbeis. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News Items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring June 
Parker. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic 

Thursday. January 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
spe: sed with musical nnmheis. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News Items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his orches- 
tra. 

9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Trio. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, January 7 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m.— Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
spc sed with mus'ral numbers. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News Items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Babe Brown and his uku- 
lele. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday. January 8 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 to B:00 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
noeised with musical numbers. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring Ray 
Kellogg and Bill Hatch, violin and piano. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Broa Frolic* 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO- 
SEATTLE— 384.4 
Sunday, January 2 

11:00 to 12:30 p. m.— Church Service, 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening Service. 
9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under direction 
of Henry Damskt. 

Monday, January 3 

10:00 to 10:3" a. m. — "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

10:X0 to 11:S0 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



January 1, 1927 i 



8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, January 4 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program, 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:16 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Wednesday, January 5 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quotations 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Thursday, January 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

6:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — K.1R News Items. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
11:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 

Friday, January 7 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
8:30 to 10:00 o. m. — K.IR Studio Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. . 

Saturday, January S 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

6:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 

— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday, January 2 

11:00 a. m. — Service of St. John's Episcopal 

cathedral. 
5:00 p. m. — Vesper Service. 
7:30 p. m. — Evening song service. 

Monday, January 3 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Children's hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday, January 4 

13:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Farm question box. 

8:30 p. m. — Ray-O-Vac Twins. 

9:00 p. m. — Instruction In Auction Bridge. 

Wednesday, January 5 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

6:27 p. m. — National Farm Radio Council talk 

7:30 p. m. — Wynken, Blynken and Nod. 

8:00 p. m.- — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Ray-O-Vac Twins. 



Thursday, January 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:15 p. m. — lalk "Care ui the Eyes." 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

Friday, January 1 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Instrumental Concert. 

1:00 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:16 p. m. — 'lalK "Cart; ot the Eyes." 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:3U p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion Review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:00 p. m. — "Aggie Kickof'fs," Extension Ser- 
vice. 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 
school lesson. 

S:oo p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio prog! am. 

9:30 p. m. — "The Christmas Carol." 

Saturday, January S 

10:30 a. m. — Service of St. John's Episcopal 

Cathed al. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
10:30 p. m. — Dance program. 



KRE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 

Sunday, January 2 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Church Service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Pinner Concert. 
8:15 to 9:00 p. m.- — Social concert. 

Monday, January 3 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday, January 4 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Wednesday, January 5 

11:16 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 
5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

Thursday, January C 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, January 7 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Saturday, January 8 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance program. 



At Elder Gallery 

The lecture season in the Paul Elder 
Gallery following the holiday intermis- 
sion will be opened by Axton Clark, 
Saturday afternoon, January 8th, at 
2:30 o'clock, with a review of "Sex, 
Literature, and the Family." He will 
discuss two books recently published ; 
namely, "Sex Expression in Litera- 
ture," by V. F. Calverton, and "The 
Book of Marriage," a symposium by 
various authors, led by Count Keyser- 
ling. Mr. Clark, whose interests are 
both literary and philosophical, will 
consider these books in the light of the 
general problems raised in this day and 
age by the so-called "new freedom" 
that is so strongly affecting our habits 
and our attitudes, our valuations and 
our institutions. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

"Nights of Love", with an all-star cast 
including Julene Carten, Helen Ruth, 
(Chester Bright and John Torina; the 
madcaps of mirth, William and Joe 
Mandel in "Quiet, Please"; and Owen 
McGiveney, the distinguished protean 
actor presenting "Bill Sikes," a quick- 
change dramatic episode from Dickens. 
The other feature acts will include 
the come jy su'prise of the season, "The 
Wager," which contains a laugh a sec- 
ond ; Lady Oden-Pearse, S.S.R.A.M., 
an English Noblewoman, who has been 
acclaimed as one of the leading Royal 
Violinists; Toe and Willie Hale in "Bits 
of Vaudeville"; and another act to be 

announced later. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

New Year's week at the Golden Gate 
theater, which opens with the Satur- 
day matinee, will be one gala ho'iday 
bill headed bv Jerry and her Baby 
Grands, a modern piano revue with a 
company of twenty people. Geraldine 
Valliere directs the act. with Mollie 
Klinger and Florence Kingsley fea- 
tured players. 

Clarabelle Barrett, world's champion 
long distance swimmer, is on the pro- 
gram. The Hamilton S'.sters and Flor- 
dyce offer "Play Time," a singing and 
dancing patter. Cosica and Verdi, mu- 
sicians and comedians, give "Stringing 
Comedy," and the Kilaros, Japanese 
acrobats, fill the bill. 

The Golden Gate picture this week is 
"Midnight Lovers," a comedy of mar- 
ried life, starring Anna Q Nilsson and 
Lewis Stone, with Chester Conklin in 
an important role. 

Granada * * * 

The Granada theater offers "Hotel 
Imperial" as its screen attraction dur- 
ing New Year's week, with Pola Negri 
the star. James Hall is in supporting 
role as a young spy. This picture is a 
drama of strong emotion and love, 
filmed against an unusual background 
of wartimes. 

The Jack Partington stage attraction 
will be another musical act set in at- ' 
tractive and elaborate scenes, with 
Eddie Peabody, the musical magnet, 
twanging his banjo and playing the 
kind of music one remembers for many 
a day. Peabody's programs are of high 
musical standards as well as peppy 
enough to suit the lovers of genuine 
jazz. Partington has outdone himself 
for the holiday stage revue with hand- 
some girls and colorful costume; strik- 
ingly displayed. 

* * * 

Pantages 

James J. Corbett, former heavy- 
weight champion, is the headliner at 
(Continued on Page 19) 



January 1, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

The New Italian Steamship "Roma" 

HER 33,000 tons, a length of 709 feet, a breadth of 83.5, a 
height of 30 from the keel to the bridge, a speed of 22 
miles per hour, developed from four turbines, make the 
•Roma" a real leviathan of the Italian Merchant Marine. 

She is 9,000 tons bigger than the "Duilio," which up to 
the present has been the largest Italian liner, and she pos- 
sesses the same fine qualities fitting her for the sea, the 
same elegance and comfort even to the smallest detail, the 
same perfect attendance. 

The 13 water-tight compartments, the longitudinal water- 
tight deck and double bottom running through her whole 
length, assure her strength and make the "Roma" unsink- 
able. A magnetic compass, a gyroscopic compass, a self- 
steering gear, loud-speaking telephones, appliances for sub- 
marine signalling, and the ultra-powerful wireless system, 
together with the 36 life-boats capable of accommodating 
more than the total number of persons on board, afford the 
passengers the greatest guarantee of safety. 

The artist drew his inspiration for his work from the 
greatest models of two golden periods of Italian Art: the 
Renaissance and the Rococo, and while adapting them to 
the necessities of comfort on board, preserved the spirit of 
them, so that Italian Art cheers the passenger from the 
commencement of his voyage and accompanies him on the 
return journey with the sweetness of its memories. 

On deck B there is the magnificent series of Saloons, 
which, covering a length of 330 feet, alternate the austere 
forms of the End of the Fifteenth Century with the lively 
ornamental traceries of the Eighteenth Century. 

From bow to stern there are: the Entertainment Saloon, 
with its mirrors and gildings; the Grand Vestibule, with 
the four adjacent Galleries, a triumph of simple architec- 
tural forms and of exquisite color and ornamental details: 
the Dining Saloon of complex ami ample proportions; the 
Entrance, 'of solid Renaissance, the Reading and the Chil- 
dren's room. On the deck above, there are the Bar, the 
Winter Garden and the Summer Garden, decorated on Fif- 
teenth Century lines, pleasingly adapted to the purpose of 
the different rooms. 

The union of Art with comfort has been even more ad- 
mirably successful in the case of the cabins of the luxe ac- 
commodations, to which access is afforded by magnificent 
Stairways or by lifts. Large, light, and well ventilated, 
with the walls covered with damask or carvings, whilst 
preserving in the form- all the essence of the past, these 
cabins substantiall) afford all the comfort of the most exact- 
ing ol passengers. 

A verandah of 5150 square feet and a promenade of 12.600 
square feet on deck B : one of 6200 on deck A. in addition to 
the whole upper deck, give the greatest possibilities tor ex- 
ercise and rest on a -pace exceeding 26,000 square feet 
On the large spaces on the upper deck, there are the favor- 
ite games of the North American passenger. 

The concerts, the brilliant dancing, the evening cinema, 
the Information Bureau with its tourist service, the Art 
Shop, the photographic equipment and service with dark 
room, the daily newspaper printed on board, the reading 
trmm with n<->on -ines in the different laneuaees :>nd the 
rich library with books on Italy under all aspects, afford the 
passenger numerous forms of recreation. 



the esplanades at Monte Carlo, San Sebastian, Nice and other 
famous European watering places. 

The Mayor also s.atecl that work would also commence, 
in the near future, on the paving of Water Street and Pacific 
Avenue. "The Water Street work has already been ordered 
and will be completed during the coming months," stated Ker- 
rick. "It is our hope and expectation that the entire paving 
program, including the Esplanade and Pacific Avenue will be 
completed before the advent of another summer season." 
* * * 

Hundreds of Santa Cruz boys and girls are getting ready 
to take part in the New Year's day dip in the ocean, which will 
be the opening special fea'.ure of this year's Santa Cruz Flower 
Show and Baby Parade, January 1 and 2. The dip will take 
place at 2 :00 p. m. on New Year's day, Saturday, January 1. 
Motion picturemen from the news weeklies will be on hand to 
film the unique mid-winter event. 



News from Santa Cruz 

w ■' r>n rv>v<ne t| )P Fcn|f>n*rV. fames drive fronting the 

equallv famous beach at Santa Cms, will start soon, predict* 

Mavor W. O. Kerrick. When comple e 1 the Esplanade will 

be one of the most beautiful drives in the state, comparing with 



INVESTMENTWTRADING COUNSEL 



SUTRO & CO. 

Established 1858 

410 Montgomery St., 504 Oakland Bank Bldg., 

San Francisco Oakland 

Members San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1»71 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 19! 




THE Public Relations Department of the National As- 
sociation of Credit Men has always made a very con- 
servative and painstaking summary of economic conditions 
Speaking of the immedia'e prospect, from the point of view o 
the credit man, it says that there is nothing in any pessimistic 
prediction of depression. Bank deposits have shown a notable 
increase toward the close of the year. 



— The improvement in transportation facilities is one of th< 
most marked achievements of recent months. The result ha 
been a greater earning capacity on the part of the transporta 
tion companies, owing to the economic handling of freight an 
the institution of economies which have at the same time cu 
down operating expenses. 

* * * 

— In a recent issue of the "Outlook" is a story of a negro 
preacher who said to his congregation: "Brethren, we must do 
something to remedy the status quo." "Brudder Jones, what 
am de status quo " asked a member. "Dat, my Brudder," re- 
plied the preacher, "am de Latin for de mess we'se in." 



— Litigation is pending over the ownership of the making of 
"glass shots" in moving pictures. Attorney Hazlehurst, who 
bought the patents to the methods of making these "glass 
shots," is asking for an accounting from the various studios 
which have taken up the methods, as he claims, without the 
necessary right. 

* * * 

— Truffles are, for some reason or other, becoming more 
and more scarce, and the trained pigs of the Dordogne de- 
partment of France are face to face with hard times. These 
pigs, whose sole reason for being is their skill in discovering 
truffles, are now seriously menaced. 



—The California District Forest Service is out with a state- 
ment regarding the fires of last year. Something should be 
done to meet this condition which is serious beyond all pro- 
portion, for the community. Thus there were 1,662 different 
fires, which cost, in order to suppress, $565,136. Sixty-eight 
per cent of these fires were entirely due to human carelessness. 
The extent of the fires may be judged from the fact that they 
covered 584,601 acres. 

* * * 

— Among the activities of the Southern Pacific during the 
last few weeks has been the making of Christmas puddings 
in which the company has been so successful that, according 
to the Bureau of News of that organization, "they have brought 
a flood of requests for the recipe." 

* * * 

—About $200,000,000 last year is the amount of loss in the 
petroleum industry of the United States, due to water-in-oil- 
emulsions. These form in any field where water is produced 
with oil, whether such water exists in the oil-sand itself or 
enters the hole from the strata above or below the producing- 
sand. v s 

* * * 

—England is wrestling with the problem of finding an easily 
ignitable, smokeless fuel for open-grate fires. The crowded 
populations in the cities have made the essential requisite of 
smokelessness. The economic waste in transporting large quan- 
tities of coal in bulk is about to be met by scientific ingenuity 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1968 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with c; "xer Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1926 

Assets $109,430,478.72 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,400,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $557,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Hainht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4%) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif 



Snn Frnnclaco. Calif. 
4-4-J lljirki-l Street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Pnld Up Cnpifnl $20,000,000 $20,000,000 RrnerTe Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transuded 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS enVcted promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER COO BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WA.PH.; MEXICO CITl, MKA.1CO. 

San Francisco Office: 4S0 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J, I ill I, I 11A11D 

Manager ANKt. Mauaicer 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer* of 

RIVETET> STEET, PTPE. TANKS. Cn/VERTS, rFASTOCKS 

l'l.UMES. GVSllOLDEItS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



Low Anircle*. Cnllf. 
17 Smilu l-*e Awn no f 

■-- 4 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervis-lon of C. P. A. 

Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtfu'l, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYounc Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 



2«8 Crocker Bull.Iinc (Opposite Palace Hotel) Su 
^ Phone Kearny 391 



n Franclaco 



1! muary 1, 1927 



% 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Pacific Edge water Club 



!i 



San Francisco is to have a new and exclusive club to add 
j the list of attractions that brings travelers to this city 

oni all parts of the world. The new club has been chris- 

ned the Pacific Edgewater Club because of its chosen site 
n the Great Highway overlooking the Pacific Ocean. 
luilding Plans are being prepared by Miller and Pflueger, 
rchitects, whose national fame has been increased by San 
'Ancisco's 27-story Telephone Building. 

Exterior plans of the $2,000,000 Pacific Edgewater Club 
ave been completed, according to Timothy L. Pflueger, 

ho said that work is now progressing on design and ac- 
ommodations of the interior of the eight-story building. 

San Francisco, as the first city of California and as the 
ntrance to the Orient, has been symbolized in the archi- 
jcture of the club building. Early California architecture 
as been elaborated by use of designs from the palaces of 
pain, which in the days of its world power drew artists 
■om France, Italy and the Orient to beautify the mansions 
f the wealthy. An atmosphere of cosmopolitan culture will 
featured in the decorations of the Pacific Edgewater 
'lub. 

Broad terraces have been planned for the third and 
eventh floors of the building to provide promenades and 
ea gardens from which to view the panorama of the Pacific. 
assing from the ornate lobby on the ground floor to the 
erraced garden at the rear of the club building, the guest 
rill find ballrooms, dining rooms and comfortable lounge 
ooms. A Persian coffee shop will provide for the hurried 
iner. Billiard rooms and rooms for games will occupy 
djoining floors. 

Each room of the 125 in the dormitory will have a private 

4 ! jath and be so located that the guest may enjoy the mag- 

ificent view from the club windows. Every access will be 

>rovided from the dormitory to the swimming pool and 

rymnasium, which in turn will have their own locker rooms 

I ind showers. 

Club playgrounds and playpools are planned essentially 
or the entertainment of the children of members and 
juests. The shallow paddling pool for children will be prop- 
erly attended. 

Property for the Pacific Edgewater Club was obtained 
or a reported price of $220,000 from Julian Weissbein. It 
ncludes a 275-foot frontage on the Great Highway adjoin- 
ng Taits-at-the Beach and a full 600 foot block at the rear 
sounded by Vicente and Ulloa, 46th and 47th Avenues. 

The block at the rear of the clubhouse will be devote. 1 to 
lUtdoor sports. Tennis and handball courts, a putting 
jreen, a tan bark ring for equestrian displays, a stable to pro- 
ride housing for the i lull's string of animal-, and other 
ields for -.ports will be laid out on this property. 

Membership in the club will be limited and carefully 
selected by tin- hoard of gt)Vcrnors, according to the an- 
"1 lounced policy. Membership will provide for all members 
Ipf a family, and will include certain guest privilegi 

miction of the club building is proposed to begin 
mmediately upon completion and approval of plans and 
specifications now in in the architect's offices. No 

delays, unless unavoidable, will be tolerated by the man- 
agement, it is said. 



Honest Waiter 

"Bring me some chicken salad." ordered a diner. 

"Yes, sir." replied the servitor. "Veal or pork chicken?" 

* * * 

Wisdom of Infancy 
"And what, little girl," asked the lady visitor, "are you 

to be when you grow up?" 
"I's donna be a blonde secretary," replied the innocent 
babe, "so's my daddy will go out with me sometimes." 




Tel. Davenport 4980 

655 SACRAMENTO ST. 

Between Montgomery and 

Kearny Streets 

San Francisco, Calif. 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

454 Post Strutt, San Fbancisco, Cllif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. IS Tlllmniin 1'lure, at 11-41 Cirnnl Avenue 

The Nome of the Hook Lover 

Hare Bo'jks — First Editions — Kine Bindings 

Importations from Zaclmsdoif, Hoot, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

I'httne Uenrn,v Will 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



^^ MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

r ThosEKeni Shirts ' ItlOsEKeni 

^WW JSZL ^aW 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Keakky Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



S»3 Po.T Srair 
l> \ in, im* Horn. 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Par man [>y*ut( md Cleaning 



Sam Funciic* 
Pbohb Fuhiuk 2Slt 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

i:»l.'il,llahr<J IS4M 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

SS.1 TEHAMA STREET. SAN FRAHCISCO 
Phone l)»UKlni 30&4 



Chapel- 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Su., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1 



Q2: 



Porter, 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Gladys Simpson, Beatrice Herwitz, 



Dixie Pratt, 
and Mesdames C. J. Simpson and Anne Bennett, chaper 



Trail Club 

A group of Burlingame and San Mateo society people ^are 
arranging a riding club to be known as the Trail Club. 1 he 
organization will be similar to the Woods.de Trad C tab 
which has been in existence for several years and whose 
members include many of the Menlo Park and Woodside 

"°m£ Helen Chesborough, Mr. William S. Tevis and Mr 
Milton Bugbee are among those organizing the club, and 
among the members will be Mr. and Mrs. William G. Par- 
rott Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Tobin, Mrs. Corbett Moody, Mrs. 
William W. Crocker and the Misses Mary and Patncia 

Clark. 

* * * 

Miss Maryetta Carrick was hostess at Christmas lunch- 
eon on Saturday entertaining a group of friends at the 
Fairmont Hotel. The guests were seated at two large round 
tables gaily decorated with autumn flowers. Bridge fur- 
nished amusement for the afternoon. Those present were 
Misses Mariella Laidley, Marjorie Parcells, Caroline Mc- 
Namara, Dorothy Seawell, Delpha Kitchener, Content 
Scott, Edwina Boell, Dorothy Farran, Irene Carrick, Mark 
McKimmins, Thelma Morgan, Marjorie Sanborn, Elizabeth 
Thompson, Frances Mulvany, Dorothy Mills, Eleanor Scott, 
Janet Thompson, Betty Champlin, Anna Grace Williamson, 
Corrine Brandenburg, Caroline Bruner, Beatrice Colton, 
Elizabeth Eader, Helen Fake, Gladys Bostwick, Bernice 
Blackstock, Eva May Lange, Myra Beaman, Jane Kleiser, 
Helen Morgan, Helen Stevens, Fay Snyder, Jean Moir, 
Anne Kennedy, Fay Hickey ; Mesdames Theodore Michels. 
Stanley McCutchen, Randolph Walker, Ernest Wilson and 
Perry Gardiner. 

* * * 

Winter Sports 

Lake Tahoe will be the scene of unusual winter sports 
over New Year's with many prominent people from all parts 
of California making merry in the snow. 

A toboggan slide of three-quarters of a mile long, at a 
grade of 23 per cent is one of the attractions. Skiing, snow- 
shoeing, sleighing, indoor and outdoor ice skating will pro- 
vide scenes of festivity and frolic. 

Warmth and snugness will be provided guests at the 
hotels, many customs of the old hospitality of old taverns 
in England being carried out in the plan of entertainment. 
Around a roaring fire, guests may gather for games of 
bridge or other diversions. Dancing in the pavilions of the 
hotel will be part of the delights over the holidays. 

The Tavern will be open until the middle of March. 
Among the prominent families and well known Califor- 
nians who are celebrating the New Year include: Dr. and 
Mrs. H. E. Alderson, Miss Vere de Vere Adams, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. S. Dover, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Dohrmann, Mr. and 
Mrs. Herbert Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Hogan, 
Mrs. Wickham Havens, Mrs. Elsie Brougher, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Magee, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Metcalf, Mr. H. A. 
Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Ghirardelli, Dr. and Mrs. W. 
E. Stevens, Dr. Russell Ryan, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Volk- 
mann, Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Land and daughters. 



Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Baldwin of Pasadena engaged 
their private Pullman for a party of twenty who will spend 
several weeks in early January at Tahoe Tavern. 
(Continued on Page 21) 




, 



LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — battery Service 

AT CALI'ET GAS STATION 
Post nnd Franklin Street* Son Franclnco, Calif. 



C11AS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Uppusile Palace Holel 
HAVE: 11)111 CAKS H \M1LU AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

flaU>!>: 35c i»cr tin* ; 97.30 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



Graysloue 130 Open Day ap'I Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

18U3 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 
Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Polsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing. Oiling, Greasing, Washing and Polishing 

Gasoline I Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4200 

Metal Work Apper- 
taining lu Auionui- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Ulock- 
smlthing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



"CUT THIS OUT" 



This Coupon entitles Mr 

to FREE Inspection and Minor 
Adjustments of Hydraulic Four Wheal 
Brakes. 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 
457 Ninth Street Telephone Market 1188 San Francisco 



January 1, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
Nnlloiiui Automobile Club 

Motor Legislation in 1927 

THE usual number of freak bills 
to control the operation and sale 
of motor vehicles will be introduced at 
the spring session of the California 
Legislature, according to Ben Blow, 
Fieid Secretary of the National Auto- 
mobile Club. The speed limit will come 
up for discussion with advocates for 
increasing as well as reducing the 
ent late. Nevada has been succi 
in restricting the reckless operation of 
motor cais without a speed limit other 
than that consistent with safety. The 
California rale of thirty-five (.0) miles 
per hour, on the other hand, will prob- 
ably withstand any attack from those 
who wish to raise the limit. A bill to 
force motorists to equip their cars with 

feovernors was introduced at the last 
Legislature but did not emerge from 
Committee. 

The drivers' license provisions "I the 
Motor \ chicle Act will undoubtedly 

be changed ami there will be advocates 
of an annual license plan so that some 
type of nominal examination will be 
necessa \ ever) year for all drivers of 
motor vehicles. Vnother much mis- 
understood portion of the Motor Ve- 
hicle Ad which is due for reform is 
the restriction governing headlights 
which has been enforced off ami on by 
the Motor Vehicle Department but 
which is so technical that the ordinary 
motorist fails to correct his glaring 
headlights more through ignorance 
than through any deliberate idea of 
violating the law. 

One of the most important matters 
of legislation affecting the motor ve- 
hicle in California will be the introduc- 



tion of a number of measures affect- 
ing the sale and transfer of motor ve- 
hicles as well as the Certificate of Title. 
The Motor Vehicle Department has al- 
ready put into effect a plan for the trac- 
ing of ownership of motor vehicles 
from factory to operator and has or- 
dered for the 192/ registration period 
that a manifesto be issued by the fac- 
tory to accompany every new car sold 
and provide clear title for the dealer or 
owner. Some provision of this sort 
will probably be incorporated in the 
Motor Vehicle Act by this session of 
the Legislature. 

Measures to protect the Finance 
Companies as well as buyers of auto- 
mobiles and legitimate dealers have 
been prepared for submission to the 
Legislators, particularly on account of 
the losses sustained through fraudulent 
concerns securing a number of loans 
on single machines last year. This re- 
sulted in losses in excess of a million 
dollars for one Finance Company alone. 

The activity of theft rings and in- 
dividual automobile thieves in Califor- 
nia in 1926 cost the motorists of Cali- 
fornia a great amount of money and 
trouble and measures calculated to pro- 
tect the individual motorist and the In- 
surance Companies against this field of 
crime will undoubtedly be proposed 
for inclusion in the Motor Vehicle Act. 

All in all, the Legislative session of 
1927 promises to provide some inter- 
esting battles with the Motor Vehicle 
Act as the ground of argument. In 
addition to changes in the Motor Ve- 
hicle Act. steps must be taken for the 
financing of California's highway sys- 
tem either bj bond is-ue or direct tax 
or by some other met boil which has yet 
to be devised. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 14) 

the P theater for the week be- 

ginning Saturday. He is assisted in a 
novel act l>\ Bobby Barry. "Broad- 

w ,i\ 's Favorite." 

* * * 

Cameo 

The popular Cameo theater on Mar- 
ket street will have for their New 
Year's week set ecu attraction the thrilling 
photoplay. "Three Bad Men." Featur- 
ing Ge irge O'Brien, (dive Borden and 
Lou Tellegen, in a series of exciting 
events in which the plot thickens and 
deept 

During the recent programs at the 
Cameo there have also been screened 
a number of famous pictures in colors, 
ami the world's work of the masters 
featured in these pictures offers a rare 
and surprising treat for those who ap- 
preciate art. The Cameo has the very 
first of news reels on its programs in 
addition to the feature picture. 

"Three Bad Men" will be screened 
for the entire week. 



qAs Christmas comes 
this year 



iWe can express our greetings to 
you in no better way than promising 
to keep your gas and electric service 
as nearly perfect as possible. 

So when your Holiday dinners are 
cooking merrily on your gas or elec- 
tric range, you'll then know our 
Christmas Greetings are borne to 
you on the wings of good service. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PG 



.and 




"»ACI7IC SERV1CI- 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




• Companion, of 
Tie morning •• • 
it> refreshing*- • 




CEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1300,000 cup* were served at the 

Panama-Pacific International Expoalttan 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1927 



«9vays» 



«"5\J5S, 



<&> 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



«*,' 



a* 




Mrs. Ernest 
La Fleur, 

one of the leading 
ivomen members of 
the Lake Merced 
Golf and Country 
Club. 



GOLF has taken such a pronounced hold on the Ameerican 
public of today that it is a rare event to meet anyone about 
town who does not play the ancient game. New golf courses 
have been completed during the past year, and many more are 
under construction. The new Monterey Peninsula Country 
Club at Del Monte is the last word in golf construction. This 
magnificent golf links is another of Herbert Fleishhacker's 
endeavors to give golfers from all over the world an oppor- 
tunity to play over the most picturesque 36-hole course in 
existence, which is located in the heart of Del Monte Forest, 
overlooking Monterey Bay, with its 28,000 acres of timber 
land. The Monterey Peninsula golf course is within eight 
miles of the Del Monte Hotel. There are approximately 1000 
members, each of whom acquired a home site along with the 
membership. Hundreds of members have already built beau- 
tiful homes on their acreage, and many other homes are under 
course of construction. The sumptuously furnished clubhouse 
lends an air of comfort to the surroundings. 

* * * 
California Club Opens It's Doors 

The new California Golf and Country Club, at Baden, also 
opened up during the past year. William Hendrick Taylor, 
president of the California Club and manager of the Interna- 
tional Banking Corporation, set a new record of membership 
and finance when he gave its members a new country club with 
a non-assessable membership. The new California Club is 
located at Baden — a thirty-minute ride from the city. The 
clubhouse and course is located in the centre of 426 acres of 
rich, fertile soil and is a full championship course of 6450 
yards, designed by Vernon McCann, the English architect, and 
is considered by experts to be one of the most ideally laid out 
and best constructed courses in the state. Long before the club 
was completed they had a full membership of 410, with over 
fifty on the waiting list. Since the club was opened last April, 
several tournaments have been pulled off. The opening tourna- 



ment attracted 300 entries and was won by J. D. Roantree, ■ 
the sixteen-year-old high school boy. 
* * * 

Municipal Links Still in Favor 

That the municipal links at Lincoln, and at Harding Me- 
morial Parks, are still in favor, is shown by the constant stream 
of regular afendants who pass through the gates each day. 
No less than half a million devotees of the great old Scottish 
game have patronized both courses during the past year, and 
upwards of $160,000 has been paid for green fees. 

Herbert Fleishhacker, president of the Park Commission 
and the outstanding figure in golf today, is greatly respon- 
sible for the beautiful Municipal links at Lincoln and Hard- 
ing Park. There are probably no two finer Municipal golf 
cou'ses in existence. 

Lincoln Park has Jong been acknowledged by travelers 
from all over the world to be the most picturesque golf 1] 
course in the world. 

These links are matchless in their setting over-looking 
the Pacific Ocean, Golden Gate Strait, San Francisco Bay. . 
and embracing a broad sweep of Marin and Berkeley Hills 

These differ from most municipally owned links in that 
they are daily supervised by Superintendent of Parks, John I 
McLaren, who gives the benefit of the broad experience 
gained in his forty-years of service to Park construction. 

Mr. McLaren has given our City Parks the benefit of his 
observations gained in his trips abroad. Uncle John, as he 
is known by his numberless friends, makes his daily rounds 
over the various Parks and devotes much of his time to the ; 
care of the Municipal links. 

Mr. McLaren has an able assistant in Tom McHugh, 

the manager at Lincoln Park, who consults with him daily 

regarding the up-keep of the course. Tom has served the 

city faithfully for thirty-five years and is considered one of 

the best grass authorities in the state and a very efficient 

greens keeper. 

* * * 

Mr. Fleishhacker Has Great Foresight 

Herbert Fleishhacker has shown his great thought and 
judgment in developing these city owned golf links. When 
he took office several years ago, he and William F. Hum- 
phrey, president of the Olympic Club, immediately con- 
sulted with John McLaren regarding ways and means of 
beautifying the approach of Lincoln Park. The result today 
is that the patrons at Lincoln step onto a course that is as 
good, if not better, than many of the privately owned 
courses. Paul Weitzka, the official keeper of the gate, and 
his assistant Alex McCulIough, meet you with a smile when 
you step up to sign the register and get your starting time. 

Paul is comfortably housed, and the patrons have been 
provided with a restaurant, lockers, showers for both men 
and women, and a copious shelter in case of rain. 

This article would not be complete without giving Of- 
ficer Ben Smith a word of praise. Officer Smith is on the 
lookout all the time attending to his special duty. 
* * * 

Harding Park Well Attended 

The Harding Memorial Park Municipal golf course is 
not quite as popular as Lincoln Park, owing to the fact that 
it is less accessible by street car line; but considering the 
fact that one has to have an auto to get to this park, it is 
worthy of note that there have been many times during the 
height of the season that seven hundred patrons have played 
the course in a single day. 



January 1, 1927 



THE SAX PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



The women are the ones who take advantage of this 
beautiful course and hardly a week passes without the 
fair sex holding some sort of a tournament. 

Mrs. R. P. Davis, former captain at Lincoln Park, has 
had a very successful year, having won many of the weekly 
events. 

Mrs. J. C. Dunleavy, who captains the Harding Park- 
women, deserves a lot of credit for the interest she has 
taken in furthering these tournaments. 

J. M. Jacobi is another ardent devotee who has infused a 
lot of interest into the patrons at Harding Park. Jacobi 
gave a Santa Claus tournament which attracted over 200 
entries and was won by R. D. Skelly. 



The famous Canada Dry Hole-in-One Club has just wel- 
comed into its membership the following: 

Mr. Lee H. McCurdy, 735 Yale Ave., Claremont, Calif. ; 
Mr. Wm. A. Rhodes, 22 Second St., San Francisco, and Mr. 
H. B. Fredericks, 377 Belmont St., Oakland, Calif.; Mr. Ben 
Catlin. 417 Orange St., Oakland, Calif., and Mr. A. E. Tipple, 
249 -4th Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

This club, during the past two years, has enrolled 5,500 
members. 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 18) 



Dinner Dance 

Mr. and Mrs. George D. Smith entertained a group of 
friends last Saturday night at the new Mark Hopkins Hotel, 
haying as their guests Mesdames and Messrs. Mile Robbins. 
William Shaw, E. L. Bowes, Howard Monroe and George 
Thierbach. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. McNear will make their home 
in San Francisco at the new Hotel Mark Hopkins, where they 
have leased a beautiful apartment-suite on one of the upper 
floors, from whence a panoramic view of the city and bay is 
obtained. Mr. and Mrs. McNear are now en route back to San 
Francisco from the East by way of the Panama Canal. 

* * * 

Mr. C. S. Falk and Miss Edna Sally Falk have moved from 
the Bellevue Hotel and are now established in their new apart- 
ment at the Hotel Mark Hopkins on Nob Hill. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. George D. Smith entertained at a dinner party 
for ten in Peacock Court at the Hotel Mark Hopkins last 
Friday. The guests were Mesdames and Messrs. W. K. Bowes, 
Herbert Witt, Albert Evers, Dr. and Mrs. Howard Fleming. 

* * * 

Mrs. O. B. Trigg of Monterey was the guest of honor at a 
luncheon and bridge given by Mrs. George Hyde last Saturday 
at the Hotel Mark Hopkins'. 

Lunch, was served in Peacock Court. Following which the 
Wests played cards in one of the beautifully decorated private 
parlors of the new hotel. 

Among those present, in addition to the guest of honor, were 
Mesdames J. S. Fairweather, Richard rum Suden, Benjamin 
Pope, Victor Etienne. Frank La Valley, Alfred Harwood, 
Thomas Wood, Fred Fisk, Lloyd Hardie. Miss Rose Marie 
Callaghan. 



A Job 

The circus acrobat found the clown in tears. 
"What in the world arc you crying about?" he asked. 
"The elephant d-d-died," sobbed the clown. 
"What of it? You didn't own him." 
"N-no, b-but the b-boss says I've g-got to d-dig 

rave." — From the "American Legion." 



THE MIRACLE 



San Francisco, this week, lias had the rare privilege of seeing 
the world's greatest drama, "The Miracle," a super-structure 
of the Ages, which will continue for the next two weeks in the 
Civic Auditorium where notable principals and a cast of more 
than 600 people appear in the magnificent pantomime. 

Describe "The Miracle" in one short paragraph? One might 
as well attempt the history of the world in one brief chapter 
of a book. 

Supreme, superlatively sublime, mighty in purpose, tone and 
structure; spiritual, dramatic, lofty, powerful! The full vo- 
cabulary of effective adjectives cannot, could not, describe "The 
Miracle." 

The Civic Auditorium where this glorious pageant is pre- 
sented does not seem like the auditorium at all. The interior 
has been transformed, as if by magic, into a medieval Gothic 
Cathedral with towering pillars, altar and sanctuary. Darkened 
corridors, subdued lights and improvised stained-glass win- 
dows immediately envelope one's mind with the sense of- sacred- 
ness and power. 

Lady Diana Manners, the world's famous "most beautiful" 
woman, takes the role of the Madonna in most performances: 
at other times she is the Nun, Megildis. Graceful, exquisite, 
she poses for a long time as the statue of the Madonna. Then, 
descends from her pedestal to perform the duties of the run- 
away Nun. The strength of silence, the power of poise and the 
spell of spiritual force surge through the heart, the mind and 
the soul of one, as she moves about the chapel in sympathetic 
performance of the tasks assigned the absent Nun. 

Elinor Patterson portrays every emotion with consummate 
art in her characterization of Megildis. Iris Tree and Lady 
Manners in rotation have this role. "The Piper," an outstand- 
ing character, depicting the force of evil, is essayed by Fritz 
Field, who dominates the legendary pantomime. He is an art- 
ist in his powerful part. 

The music of "The Miracle" is so lofty, so inspiring and yet 
so mightily tangible and compelling that it melts into the story, 
or leads the characters, as intended ; and, in every phrase and 
shading, lifts the audience to heights of supreme enjoyment. 

The lighting effects of this magnificent pageant are beyond 
description! They add what Max Reinhardt, Morris Gest and 
Karl Vollmoeller visioned as an encompassing illusion strength- 
ening "The Miracle." 



Quick and Dirty — I ordered strawberry shortcake. Where 
are the strawberries? 

Just Dirty — That's wdiat it's short of. — Middlebury Blue 
Baboon. 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean KoAmi, Clean Linen, Clean Evcrythhni 

Kale* Fsreptinnatly Rea*onabla 

Tflrphnne I IO 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dnnce hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

nit) baths ami swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Perk-Jurlah 



l^ALiltill It V ILLiA. CAKI STFFFEN; PROP 



French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

A Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1, 1927 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 




S h a B n,e PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete sa tisf ac- 
tion. There Is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 



^^J^JrlLJJ^jTjJ^I ^ ° u n s e a r mpl°es E 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



San Franelaco 
West 703 



Burllngame 

478 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

Snn FranclMco, Calif. 

Coil and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 
San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

526 California St. (and Branches), 
San Fiancisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st, 

1926, a dividend has been declared at the i ate 
of toar and one-quarter <4Vj) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, payable on and alter 
January 3id, 1927. Dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and earn in- 
terest from Januaiy 1st. 1927. Deposits made 
on or before Januaiy 10th. 1927. will earn in- 
terest fiom January 1st, 1927. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Secretary. 



Humboldt Bank 

7^:: Market St.. Near 4th: Bush and Montgom- 
ery Branch, Mills Building. 



For the half-year ending December 31, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the late of 
four (4) per cent per annum on savings de- 
posits, pavable on and after January 3d, 1927. 
Dividends* not called fr.r bear interest from 
January 1, 192.. Money deposited on or be- 
fore January 10, 1927. will earn interest from 
January 1, 1927. 

H. C. kij:yesahl. 
Vice-President and Cashier. 



Bank of Italy 

Head Office and San Francisco Brandies 



For the half-year ending December 31, 192';, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of t 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after January 3, 1927. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear 
the same rate of interest as the principal 
from January 1, 1927. Savings deposits made 
on the first business day of any month (or on 
or before the 10th day of January. April, July 
and October) will earn interest from the first 
of that month; deposits made after said date 
will earn interest from the first of the fol- 
lowing month. SAVINGS DEPOSITS MADE 
TO AND INCLUDING JANUARY 10 WILL, 
EARN INTEREST FR< >M JANUARY 1. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUPI. President. 



Italian-American Bank 

SE. cor. Montgomery and Sac-amento Sts. ; 
North Beach Branch, corner Columbus Ave. 
and Broadway; Columbus Branch, corner 
Montgomery and Washington Sts. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four per cent per annum on all saving de- 
posits, payable on and after- Janua-y 3, 1927. 
Dividends not called for will be added to the 
principal and bear interest f--om January 1. 
1927. Deposits made on or before January 10, 
1927. will earn interest from January 1, 
1927. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



The French- American Bank 

(Savings Department) 
108 Sutter St.. and Branches 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter (4Vi) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payab'e on and after 
Monday, January 3, 1927. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from January 1. 
1927. Deposits made on or before January 10, 
1927, will ea~n interest from Janu-irv 1. 1927. 
LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 




n. W CORNER 

POLK ano POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

OOlcc and Work* 1825 Mlulon St. 

Phone Market 71113 
Branch Olllce: 700 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Provpect 9845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Where Good Tailoring 
Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal. 
Sport and Business wear is now 
ready for your early considera- 
tion. 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
opp. olympic ci.ub 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone GarOeld 3852 5G4 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^, 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The Cily's Mom Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Lunlheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, S1.00 35c, 50c, 75c S1.00.SI.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

ifili Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 

headquarters for theatrical people 

Hattie Mooter Minnie C. Mooser 



QfccworS 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



r-- ---■ 


tfjfy^^ 


■»—■■■—■■■■■-■■————— ■.■-■-—— -——-»-»». 

Caroline Jones 
Luncheon is served from 1 I :30 to 2:30 


M 


Mil \ ¥*« 
Wo 1 l/e* 


and tea from 3 to 5 
Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 


*— — — 


9S*" 


334 Sutter St. Douglas 7113 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Farrell and 
Larktn Sti. 



BLANCO'S 



Phono 
Cray. lone 8100 



Weekdnji. Lunrheon $ ,7S 

(II :J0 to 2 p. nt.) 
Dinnrr. Week Da,i and Sunday* 1.50 



VUttOf Should Leave lite CWj With- 
"hi I'liimc in tlir Fined Cafe 
in America 



Our Main Dining Room 11 open again on Sunday$. 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

03 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11 .30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
llnlf Ulock from Hlffhirar 



rWjffif^ 



14- Mn * Hoi <» 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OHM I* * M. TO 11:00 P. M 
DHSUatPASSBD tl I-1NE 

CaBX LfoNHARDT 
Formerly of Golden Gate Park Ca.rne 



r 1 

John P. Duffy 

FISHER & CO. 

Exclusive Hatters 

Since 1851 
Christmas Merchandise Orders 



650 Market Street 
Opp. Palace Hotel 



San Francisco, Calif. 
Kearny 2465 




kr% 



ICE CREA™ 
CANDY 

PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

III STOCKTON STREET ( By (lit- Tunnel I 
Telephone Sutler l!7 I 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think flint n vigoron* lirn nit Inter once or twice a dny Is 
tnklne very erood enre of (hem, Ilru*hinir in only n |inrt of the 
proceNM. • ninny thlni;* enn hn|i|>en to your teeth which only n 
competent dcntlMt enn fnke cure of. Ilnve your teeth exnmliicd. 
They may not he nt* .sound n* you Imnprlne. A toolhnche uirnnM 
trouhle; do not wnll for the nolle. YVnlch your teeth nnil cuniM. 
There nrc mini troiihlcN i hut will drutrny teeth fouler thnn 
deeny. Are your teeth nor of l>o your ffamn bleed; Cull In toilny 
nnd tnlk It over. It will conI imihini;. My nerve blocking »>n- 
tem block*, off nil n erven nnd piiln. It will plenMC you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

I'h. .11,- < .,,,11.1,1 s.ir, 

SPECIAI.ISTS — Extraction,! Crnnnai Self Clennlnjs Brldee,: 

Porcelain Work nnd Itoollc, Plates 



T ! 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Biiildinc, Powell and Market Sts.. San Francuco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Ycu couldn't be more careful with 
your linens than we are. 

La Grande & White Laundry Co. 

"Tlie Recommended Laundry" 
250 Twelfth St.. S> Francisco "Phonb M\rket 916 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprin,," 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Street— Carfield 844 



5^iLTONEWYORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
:even never-to-be-forgotlen visits ashore at picturesque and historic ports — Rlan- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Liberlad, Salvador; Corinto, 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin an a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has on electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swimming tank. The Panama Mail it 
world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as $350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Next 
sailing? from San Francisco: SS VENEZUELA, December 31; SS ECUADOR, Jan- 
uary 22. From Los Angeles two days later. Westward from New York: SS CO- 
LOMBIA, January 15; SS VENEZUELA, February 5. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



Perfect COM FO RXf 

— ■ — ^ n 1 1 ir miT . . ' :,., — H a . ^ J ' - '- r. ' -^ ~~-—L- — — -__ — ■— ~ ' ' ■ .- ■ A .-"-t-j 



^ECONOMY! 



DISTINCTION! 






These three features com- 
bined with many other attrao 
tions, including excellent meals, 
form a combination of hotel 
service difficult to equal. 



Make your next 
stay at the 
famous 



RATES 

Per Day 

single 
European Plan 




548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




120 rooms with 

$2.50 to $4-00 
220 rooms with bath 

3.50 to 5.00 
160 rooms with bath 

6.00 to 8.00 
Double. 4.00 up 



Also a number of large and beautiful rooms and 
suites, some in period furnishings with grand pi- 
ano, fire place and bath, $10 up. 



Large and well equipped 
Sample Room* 



RANCH O GOLP CLLm 
available to all duests 



HAROLD E. LATHROP 



?%^-~^ 




ROLLS-ROYCE 



Direct Branches: 
San Francisco Los Angeles 



461 Post St. 



3136 Wilshire Blvd. 




'A Six-pointer'' 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point A — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



and 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 



tuiwrLt 1 1 kauiu fKUUKAM5, t OK NEXT WEEK, IN 1 HIS ISSUE 



10 CENTS 



LOS ANGELES 




Chandler Big Six Coupe 

$1*/C)5 Delivered Here, Fi lli Eqi ni'i-.n 

qA 'Distinctive Creation 

THE roomy, new 1927 Big Six Chandler Coupe, accommodating four pas- 
sengers easily, and finished in a rich two-tone color combination, is an 
individual car in any company. 



<I Upholstered in blue-gray mohair, the in- 
terior color combination harmonizes beauti- 
fully with that of the exterior. Its general 
air of refinement is increased by the Circas- 
sian walnut finished instrument board, door 
panels and garnish mouldings, as well as by 



an arm rest, toggle grip, smoking set and 
reading lights. 

<JThis latest Chandler creation has many 
advanced engineering features, in addition 
to the famous "One Shot" lubrication sys- 
tem. 



THE (11 VNDLER.I I I \ H \M> MOTORS CORPORATION 



CI.E\EI.\\I> 



CHANDLER -CLEVELAND MOTOR CAR CO. 

Van New .ti Sacramento— Grayslone 6700 

Louis Cohen, Associux* Deafer, 2947 Mission Su— Graystone i>7im 
Hebrank, Hunter & Peacock Co.. 3435 Broadway, Oakland 

OPEN SUNDAYS AND EVENINGS 






M 

m 




One Hundred and Eighteenth Half Yearly Report 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1668 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolida tions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



(fit 



DECEMBER 31st, 1926 
Assets — 

United States Bonds, State, Municipal and Other Bonds and Securities 

(total value $32,674,080.26), standing on books at $29,573,305.89 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 69,335,912.91 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,776,558.10 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value over $1,880,000.00), 

standing on books at 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value ever $60,000.00), standing on books at „ 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value over $565,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other Banks 11,090,787.56 

Total $111,776,567.46 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $107,226,567.46 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,550,000.00 

Total $111,776,567.46 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Vice-President and Manager. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 1926. 

(SEAL) O. A. EGGERS, Notary Public. 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4M) per cent per 
annum was declared, Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY, 

AND WHICH MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 
Deposits made on or before January 10th, 1927, will earn Interest from January 1st, 1927. 




Established July 20, 1856 



SAN £MgL c l*Co 




TER 




Devoted to the Leading Interests o£ California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20. 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 
Jr.. from 1884 to 1825. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 
Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at San Francisco, California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, 
London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



\.»1. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., JANUARY 8, 1927 



No. 2 



From One Thing to Another 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



Some women are still good looking in spite of their bobs. 

* * * 

In this age of femininism it is the man's turn to wonder 

what her intentions are. 

* * * 

The miracle is that a play pertaining to religion instead of 
beds, should draw such crowds! 

* * * 

Not such a bad world when you realize that the Bible is 
the only book which is never off the press! 

* * * 

Twenty years or so ago women swept the streets with 
their skirts; now some of our streets are never swept. 



News in twenty-three tongues is printed within sight 
the Statue of Liberty. The modern Tower of Babel. 



.1 



"With 50,000 election districts missing out of 50.000 elec- 
tion districts, William Hohenzollern announces that the 
German people want him back," says the New York Times. 

* * * 

There is no denying the fact that the grave is a serious 
handicap, even to an enthusiastic golfer, but why does the 
Lincoln Golf Club make it such an obvious one, as per the 
ghastly monuments which disfigure its velvety greens? 

* * * 

Rules and regulations, whether the} he relating to busi- 
ness, social or national affairs, are very often inconsistent 
and sometime ridiculous; for instance, it is the rule of most 
office buildings to prohibit strangers from taking any sort 
of article from an office, no matter bow thoroughly they 
may identify themselves, but it is permissible to leave any- 
thing you want to (providing it is done up into a neat and 
unsuspicious looking manner I from wild cats to bombs! 

* * * 

We read that there is a crime university in "Texas down 
by the Rio Grande," where Ma Ferguson believes so (irmly 
in "free life and fresh air" for criminals. "A crime Uni- 
versity, with blackboards, advanced courses and a voca- 
tional department, was revealed here today with the arrest 
of two men. who. police, said, admitted being instructors," 
so the dispatch goes, from a large city in that state. Well, 
draw your own conclusions! 

* * * 

At this writing, the old town clock is apparently tired of 
the job of telling commuters and others whether they are late 
or early on the job. For much too long. now. it has lagged 
behind for several hours Is the feat of fixing it too strenu- 
ous for the City Fathers: Isn't this giving tourists too big 



a chance to make derogatory comments? We might para- 
phrase Bret Harte's immortal "San Francisco" thusly : 
"Serene, indifferent to Time or Fate, 

Thou sittest at the Western ( iate." 

* * * 

Europeans never tire of reiterating their opinion of Amer- 
ica as commercial and materialistic. So, when a noted 
Britisher like G. K. Chesterton comes forth with the state- 
ment that "Of all the lies, the worst is that the American 
worships money," we gasp with astonishment and grati- 
tude. 

* * * 

"The truth is," says the Dearborn Independent, "England 
and the Continental nations not only worship money, but 
grovel before it. It enters into every marriage contract — 
which is not true in America ; it determines every social 
position — which is not true in America; it controls the en- 
trance doors to universities and colleges — which is not true 
in America ; it has the first and last say in bestowals of 
title — more than it could possibly do in America ; and, in 
spite of all the exposed scandals in American political life, 
the concealed corruption due to money in European politi- 
cal life goes wider and deeper. Money rules life in Europe; 
it does not rule life in America." 

* * * 

"There is a fascination about New York, a thrill to ex- 
perience in its towering sky line (the new Larkin Tower is 
to he 108 stories high!) its art museums, its theaters, — new- 
ones springing up, it seems to me, every month." said a 
friend to me the other evening as we sat over our coffee and 
her cigarettes; "I had been here a year or so. and an urge. 
too Strong to resist, came over me, to see the old town 

again, 

* * * 

"So off 1 went, to spend a few months in its noise and 
bustle. It is monstrous! That is the only word with which 
l,i describe its cavernous streets, its brutal sub-ways, its 
appalling elevated, its gigantic buildings, and above all. 
its thunderous roar! When I came back, even Market 
Street seemed peaceful compared to the Pandemonium I left 
behind me. People should live away from San Francisco 
for awhile, just to have the joy of coming back again." 
- * * * 

The manner in which the Union Street car;, pack and jam 
passengers into their confines, is criminal. "There is al- 
ways room for one more." is their theory, so all down the 
slippery, precipitins hills, they stop for people to alight. 
More cars should be put on during the rush hours. When 
an overloaded car runs away, perhaps the Municipal Rail- 
way officials will give some attention to this matter. 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 191 




The killing' of at least fifty people 
Governmental Murder by poisoned liquor, the poisoning 
having" been done by the govern- 
ment and the rendering blind, sick and insane of hundreds 
more from the same cause, during the holiday times, has 
roused the people of this country to indignation against the 
way in which the enforcement of the prohibition laws is at- 
tempted, as nothing which has happened heretofore. 

The fact is that the attempts to enforce the ridiculous and 
tyrannical Volstead Act has hurt our good name and our 
reputation for good sense more than all the mistakes in 
our history combined. The attempted enforcement of this 
measure has caused violations of the fundamental rights of 
American citizens. It has led to invasion of their homes, 
searching of the person without due process of law, sum- 
mary arrest and imprisonment of men and women, without 
due or any process of law and all the evils against which our 
very existence as our nation is a protest. 

But this last attempt to enforce the act by poisoning al- 
coholic liquors under the control of the government itself 
transcends all that has been done heretofore, and is a blot 
on humanity itself. In the old days, it was attempted to 
enforce laws against trespass by the use of man traps and 
spring guns which were designed to kill or maim those who 
took it upon themselves to invade property. Such instru- 
ments have been condemned universally by the courts. And 
rightly so. They are an invasion of the jurisdiction of the 
courts, which alone, in a civilized community, have the 
right to punish violations of law. 

In the case of the poisoned alcohol, the governmental of- 
ficials have taken upon themselves to punish by death people 
who undertake to disobey the provisions of the Volstead 
Act. No wonder that there is public condemnation and no 
wonder that governmental officials have declared their in- 
tention of stopping the practice. 

But the evil done cannot be remedied. 



The Criminal Syndicalist 
The Criminal Syndicalist Law Law is again under fire and 

there appears to be a very 
distinct movement on foot to endeavor to secure its repeal 
at the hands of the coming legislature. Incidentally, it must 
be said that the present movement seems to be based on a 
more rational and scientific basis than preceding attempts. 
Thus, there is being circulated a report on the operation 
of the law by the famous jurist Geo. W. Kirchwey, who has 
been dean of the law school at Columbia University and at 
one time warden of Sing Sing. It appears that Dr. Kirch- 
wey, during a visit to California last year, made a study of 
the operations of this law and has issued a report which is 
well worth reading. 

He claims that the law was made after the war while 
there was a sort of war psychosis and that it as not at any 
time an expression of the sane judgment of the people of the 
states. Such as it was, however, it was no worse than many- 
such laws which were made in other states. In this state, 
however, we endeavored to enforce it, with the result that 
man}' injustices were done. 

The facts of the operation of the law in this state seem 
to bear out the contention of the learned jurist. The large 
number of reversals of the judgments by the higher courts 
certainly point to something the matter with the trials of 



must nf the cases, fur nearly one half of the cases appeale 
were reversed. 

It appears that the broadness of the provisions of the lav 
permitted all sorts of abuse and made a good trial near! 
impossible, so that, while on the surface, the law appears 
have been not so much worse than might be expected, tl 
actual enforcement of it brought many evils in its train. 

Dr. Kirchwey's criticisms appear to be well founded and 
worthy of a first class juristic mind. 



We have as good a body of Supei 
Sagacious Supervisors visors as there is anywhere. Tak- 
ing it all together, they do their 
work pretty well and without more disgrace than super- 
visorial bodies are inclined to inflict upon the communities 
which they supervise. It is true that they are a little in- 
clined to omniscience. They have views on the governmeiv 
of Ireland and they have a special knowledge about churdj 
disputes in Mexico which makes them a little excited 
times and tends to waste time. But, taking all in all. the 
will pass, as supervisors. 

But there are some things which supervisors, whatev 
their legal powers may be, are unable to do, for want 
special knowledge, and the fact is that modern life has gj 
past the intellectual and actual grasp of the supervisor] 
body. They are not able to deal with the problems whicl 
arise in connection with great enterprises and it is not sur- 
prising that it should be so. They would have to be geniuses 
to tackle the work which is demanded of them. 

That is the reason why the great work of the city goes 
askew. We have a record of failure in those enterprises 
which call for special knowledge and the possession of more 
than demagogic powers. 

There is no question that the street railroad matter is 
being badly handled. The city suffered greatly during the 
holidays in the matter of transportation. A transportatiod 
body of experts would have given us better service, even 
with the dual ownership. And that' matter of dual owner- 
ship has to be settled, by the way. 

Again, the water and power question is in about as bad 
a state as it is possible to conceive. We do not know where: 
we are as regards either water or power. Here, again, thi 
problem is too great for the average supervisor elected to 
office. That is a question for the expert. 

And now comes the question of the bay bridge and what 
shall be done about it? Oh, our poor Supervisors! 



After the decision in the case 
More Meddlesome Muddling of Fall and Doheny and their' 

complete acquittal, after 
short deliberation, by a jury, one would have thought that 
the only decent thing was to forget the incident and to clean 
the deck of all the political debris which comes under th3 
head of the oil leases. Such a commonsense solution doea 
not. however, appeal to the Washington politicians who are 
in hopes of getting some ammunition for the coming elec- 
tion. Therefore, the trial of Fall and Sinclair has now to 
go on in connection with the Teapot Dome naval oil re- 
serve leases. There is the same charge of conspiracv ; al- 
ways very difficult to establish, even in favorable circum- 
stances. 

The defense counsel argued, it appears to us, with quite a 
show of justice, that in appointing special counsel to take 
charge of the cases against these men, they had been single! 
out for special prosecution at the hands of the government, 
through the demand of the Senate that such special counsel 
should be employed. 

The judge in charge of the case said that he saw no 
reason why Congress should not employ special counsel 
for the trial of such cases as it saw fit and that the rights 
of the accused were not infringed, as they had been regular- 
ly indicted by Grand Jurv. 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



But it would appear pretty obvious that a person who 
comes to trial, under conditions showing that he has been 
singled out by the government for special prosecution, must 
necessarily be placed in a very disadvantageous position, in 
the eyes of those who regard the attitude of the government 
with particular respect, as indeed we all do. The whole 
matter is stamped as politics of by no means a high order. 



There is little doubt that the situa- 
The Mexican Situation tion in Mexico is, by no means, all 
that it should be. In fact, the 
Mexican nation appears to be on the verge of worse times 
than it has heretofore faced. That is saying much after 
such a period of revolution as has persisted. 

The question of the oil grants is not likely to cause the 
trouble which was anticipated. The British concerns ap- 
pear to be practically ready to accept the governmental 
terms and the American concerns are likely to do the same. 
The fact is that the oil deposits in Mexico are such that they 
are relatively soon exhausted and the element of time is 
thus not so important as at first appeared. More than fifty 
of the largest concerns, British, American and Dutch, have 
expressed their intentions of complying with the terms of 
the Mexican government. 

But Mexico itself is involved in a number of difficulties 
all of which are certain to place the country in a very hard 
position for many years to come. 

Thus, the fall in the price of silver has caused many mines 
to fail and has greatly increased the number of unemployed. 
At sixty cents for silver, some of the mines could operate 
successfully, on a small margin, it is true, but enough to 
keep running and employ the Mexicans. Now, at fifty cents, 
they cannot do it and so they are shutting down. This 
complicates the situation. 

The Yaqui revolt is again another matter of danger. The 
regular Mexican army cannot cope with the Yaqui fighters. 
They are better warriors than tlie federal forces and their 
ountry is difficult of invasion. There is no doubt that the 
Yaqui successes are very considerable and that tlie papers 
are hiding the truth to a great extent. 

Altogether the coming year will l>e a hard one for Mexico. 



Tlie killing of a respectable citizen, in his 
Another Danger own garage, by a policeman is an event. 

fraught with great significance to the av- 
erage man and will necessitate a very Strict control of the 
use of lethal weapons by the police. In this case, there is 
no doubt of the respectability of the person slain and of the 

entire legality of his position at the time of the killing. 

The character of the man appears to have been such that he 
Would never have attempted an unlawful assault upon the 
police had lie known them to be police, but that he would 

gave gladh co-operated in the necessan work of the peace 
guardian^. 

This is not the first of such cases, although, in it- circum- 
fi&nces, it i-. perhaps the worst. A fleeing youth was shot 

(lead not long ago under conditions which would -cent to 
render it impossible that a felony could have been at- 
tempted. The courts have been very clear in their rulings 
that misdemeanor can never justify shooting, even where 
there is an attempted escape, and that there must be a cleat- 
case of self-protection to allow a policeman to shoot a 
terson. 

On the other hand, we have had policemen killed and 
Wounded, in the faithful discharge of their duty by felons 
and there is no doubt that such happenings tend to make 
the police nervous and to cause a temptation to resort too 
speedilv to the use of the revolver 

It is not an easy question; yet there is no doubt that we 
cannot afford to have the danger of being shot by a ner- 
vous policeman added to the manifold trials and troubles 
of life. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



Listen, Congress: What all of us really want is more 
income and less taxation. — Dallas News. 

* * * 

The ship of state is one of the few vessels whose navi- 
gators do not hesitate to move in a fog. — Norfolk Virginian- 
Pilot. 

* * * 

"Italy Plans National Theater." — Headline. Only one 
guess is needed as to who will occupy the center of the 
stage. — Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. 

* * * 

If you don't know what the Suburban Handicap is, ask 
any man who is trying- to pay for a bungalow on the instal- 
ment plan. — New York American. 

* * * 

It seems the Texas co-ed bandit stole because she had a 
husband to support. That ought to be good for a pardon 
from "Ma" Ferguson. — Chicago Daily News. 

When a statesman says war is necessary to reduce sur- 
plus population, he is thinking of some other country's 
surplus. — Portland Oregon ian. 

* * * 

Newark girl drove a burglar away by kicking him in the 
shins. The Charleston teaches them something worth while 
after all. — New York American. 

* * * 

Eastern scientist says the intelligentsia of America is 
committing race suicide, and leaves you to guess whether 
be means it as bad news or good. — Macon Telegraph. 



Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr. 

bard to be a rich man's son. 
Seattle Argus. 



is quoted as saying that it is 
Most of us find it impossible, — 



"Matrimony is a serious 
lecturer. Wrong. Matrimony 
American. 



* * 

word." 



says a domestic scieni e 
;i sentence. — New York 



If a rich man can't get a seat in the Senate and a poor man 
can't get elected, perhaps the thing will be abolished.. — 



Muskogee Phoenix. 



About the only thing a man needs to become political 
timber is the ability to plank down. — FA Paso Times. 



It you think pi 
keeping one ear . 



hie- easy, try standing on a fence while 
the ground. — Wilmington Dispatch. 

* * * 

Flection news in the future may state that the candidate 
carried the State by so many dollars instead of votes. — 
Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

Modern educational process has greatly simplified the 
three R's — from reading Yiting and 'rithmetic to rah. rah. 
rah. — Tampa Tribune. 

* * * 

Some observers say that the country can have Prohibi- 
tion if it will pay for it Others sa y the same thing about 
liquor. — Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. 

* * * 

The Old, Old Scream 
All the world loves a lover and it also loves to snicker at 
his love letters when read in court in a breach-of-promise 
suit. — Florida Times-Union. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1927 




>LE/ISURE'SW4ND 



OBEY /VO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

_ lorn Woore- 



Cu-ran 

IT IS a pleasure to herald the ap- 
proach of a triumph that is the result 
of sincere, constructive and ambitious 
endeavor. Such a triumph opens at 
the Curran Theatre on Monday night, 
January 10, when Mme. Bertha Kalich 
and her company will appear in Suder- 
mann's great dramatic masterpiece, 
"Magda." 

Kalich has given us many expres- 
sions in the past of her histrionic en- 
dowment, but according to the unani- 
mous verdict of discriminating critics 
who have viewed her "Magda," her in- 
terpretation of both characters far sur- 
passes in conception, execution and 
finesse any of her former efforts and 
lifts her into a niche in the temple of 
dramaturgy, distinctive and alone. 

With the passing of Bernhardt and 
Duse. Kalich is the only remaining 
member of the glorious triumvirate of 
women who, by their histrionic artis- 
try, sustained the highest ideals in dra- 
matic literature and expression. Her 
progress along the highway of dra- 
matic endeavor has been registered by 
signposts of achievement so dominat- 
ing in authoritative application and re- 
ward as to merit her unity in that 
great trinity of famous women of the 
stage who have always upheld the bet- 
ter things in dramatic art. Her appear- 
ance here at this time is specially op- 
portune, when there is a dearth of 
worthwhile offerings upon the legiti- 
mate stage, and a contribution such as 
she presents is truly rare in its treat to 
all lovers of the best in dramtic litera- 
ture and histrionic reflection. 

Her supporting company is an espec- 
ially capable one, embracing such 
splendid players as Warburton Gam- 
ble. Edward Fielding, Louis Muldener, 
Lester Alden, Leonard Mudie, Misha 
Auer, Ina Hards, Helena Claire Bene- 
dict, Jerome Collamore, Mary Hub- 
bard, Emily Dracken, Natalie Alex- 
ander. Marg-aret Arrow. Hilda Hil- 
strom and others of equal worth and 
repute. 

"Blossom Time" will end its engage- 
ment at the Curran on Sunday night. 
January 9. 

Wilkes 

"The Cradle Snatchers" comes to the 
Wilkes Theater, Monday, January 10, 
with Helen Bolton, Russell Medcraft, 
Norma Mitchell and other stars pre- 



By Josephine Young 

viously seen here in the hilarious farce 
heading the cast of splendid players. 

This" Louis O. Macloon production 
has proved one of the outstanding suc- 
cesses of the present time and features 
a group of women wdio start out on an 
original plan to have a bit of pleasure. 
The comical mix-ups in which they be- 
come entangled and the way the young 
men engaged to assist them really in- 
crease the trouble provide a lot of 
laughter. 

Kolb and Dill conclude their engage- 
ment at the Wilkes in "Queen High" 
at the final performance this week. 

* * * 
Alcazar 

"The Home Towners" still packs the 
Alcazar, where the dashing coined) 
has entered its fourth week of rare 
entertainment. George M. Cohan al- 
ways keeps up the pace of merriment 
typical of his comedies, and in "The 
Home Towners" one finds a continu- 
ous round of hilarity. 

Scenic features in this production re- 
quire clever stage manipulation. There 
are seven scenes in the three acts and 
quick changes are necessary. Director 
Edwin Curtis has created some fine 
sets timing the action to perfection. 

What next at the Alcazar? 

President 

Dale Winter is perhaps one of the 
principal reasons for the success of 
"The Little Spitfire," now continuing 
at Henry Duffy's theater, The Presi- 
dent, on McAllister Street, where Miss 
Winter makes the Gypsy a pert, sharp- 
tongued individual with a mind of her 
own. 

Earl Lee and ( Hive Cooper create a lol 
of merriment in their roles. They are. 
respectively, the brother and sister of the 
Spitfire. Mice Buchanan and John 
O'Hara, returning after a long absence, 
have important places in the cast. Joseph 
He Stefani, King Calder, Florence Rob- 
erts, Thomas Kelly. John Mackenzie ami 
John Sandoval are other principals. 

* * * 
Orpheum 

"Innovation Week," the third event 



•THE MIRACLE" 



Civic* Auditorium, Filial 
week starts Monthly. 
.Ijiii. 111. Bvery evenine* 
Except StiiKtny. 3Iat. 
Sat. anil Wed. Per- 
formances start S p. 
m. and - p. in. Sharp. 
LauVv Dlumi Manners 
in Every Performance. 




Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell nr. P.. well 



1. "The Home Towner*/ 

J Geo. Cohan'N Farce. 



COLUMBIA 

70 Eddy Street 



Coming — Mnrdkhi iiuil 

Ballet Rn**e — .Ian. 17. 

Direction Selby C. 

ttppcnheimcr. 



CURRAN 

Geary nr. Mason 



■M ii td a." S it derm no 
Drama. Bertha Kalich, 
Great Dramatic Act- 
ress. Iti-ii innirm,- Mon- 
day M«ht. Jan. IQth. 



PRESIDENT 

He Ylllater nr. Mkt. 



"I "The Little Spitfire." 
J" Henry DulTy Comedy. 



WILKES 

Geary at M niton 



1 



The Cradle Sun tch- 
er*. Com. Mnn.. .Inn. 
I,i> n is 4). Macloon Pro- 
duction. 



VAUDEVILLE 



GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. & Taylor 



Sessoc Hnyakawn, In 
I* e r * o n, "II a n d I t 
Prince." The Great 
Lent er, Ventrlloqulwt. 
"Pol* in Paradl*e," 
Peter U. Kyne Picture. 



"I a n o v a t i o n Week." 

Herman Timbers. Pop- 

"*i uliir Comedian. Alleen i 

t Stanley, "Vlctrola i 

O'Farrell & Powell ( Girl." "Ro*Ha," James • 

J I'.urkr and Eleanor 

Durkln. 



ORPHEUM 



PANTAGES(NEW) 1 "Summer Bachelors! 

ii ■ .... . f ^'X '*»K Act* on 

Market at Hyde J Stn K e. 



UNION SQUARE 

U'Farrell nr. Powell J 



Vnudevllle-Plcturea 



WIGWAM 

MInmIoii and 22nd 



Vaudeville-Picture* 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 



CALIFORNIA 
Market at 4th 



"The XervoDH Wreck,** 

Al i ' li r i - i i c Comedy. 

Harrison Ford. Phyllla 

Haver. 



CAMEO 
Market opp. 5th 



"The Ice Flood,** Ken- 
neth Harlan. Viola 
D a n a, S a t. to Wed. 
"*l ou'd lie Surprised," 
Raymond Grllllth, Wed. 
Sat.. Comedy-Drama 




GRANADA 

Market at Jonea St. 



an. I Leave 

'Em." 



IMPERIAL 
Market bet. flth-7t» 



carlel Letter/ 
linn Gi*h. 



ST. FRANCIS 
Market bet. 5th-6th 



"Sorrow* of Satan." 

Adolphe Menjou. 

D. \V. Grllllth Picture. 



WARFIELD 
Market nr. Taylor 



"Fnu«t,"Emil Jennings 

i 'mn lion 
"Dream 
Poe 



i"l' IIUHl. I. mil Ji- 
ll* MephlMto. Fi 
and Marco, "Di 
Poems. 



ALHAMBRA 

I V ew t 

Polk and Green 



"Sunny Side I p," Snt- 

}nrd«y. Vera Reynold 
Edith CInyton. Ed- 
mund lliirti*. ltuilolph 
mid HE* Melody Mas- 
ter*. '■Excellent Muntfl 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



of vaudeville's Centennial Celebration, 
will take place at the Orpheum Thea- 
tre for the week beginning this Satur- 
day. Herman Timberg, the popular 
comedian and producer and Broadway 
star, and his "Novelty Shop" will be 
one of the main features. Aileen Stan- 
ley. "The Victrola Girl," in a new rep- 
ertoire of songs, will return. 

The whole bill will be a feature af- 
fair and will include "Rosita" as a fea- 
ture extraordinary, who is known as 
"The Darling of Spain," with Paco 
Moreno and Pilarica ; James Burke and 
Eleanor Durkin, a clever team of enter- 
tainers, offering a hilarious skit called 
"If I Only Could"; William and Joe 
Mandel, who are scoring so heavily 
this week with their mirthful hit called 
"Quiet, Please" ; Sammy Timberg in 
"The Rebellion," a satire on the pres- 
ent craze for syncopation, with Leo 
Chaizel and the Novelty Shop Band ; 
"A Night in a Night Club," with Alice 
Ridnnr and Barbara Blair; and Some- 
thing for Nothing, "A Free For All," 
with every artist on the bill. 

* * * 

II Columbia 

Mikail Mordkin and his Ballet 
Russe are coming to the Columbia 
Theater Monday night, January 17. 
where they will give one week of ex- 
traordinary dancing for Mordkin is 
rated as the world's foremost male 
dancer. 

Mordkin is bringing a large troupe 
of remarkable dancers and with them 
a symphony orchestra to be under the 
leadership of Vladimir Bakaleynikoff, 
conductor from the Moscow Art Thea- 
ter Musical Studio. The premiere 
dancers in addition t<> Mordkin who 
will be seen in his famous "Bow and 
Arrow" dance, include Vera Nemtchin- 
ova, prima ballerina, who was for quite 
a time with Diaghileff; Pierre Vladi- 
miroff, and Hilda Butsova, who lias 

appeared for seasons with Pavlowa. 

* * * 

San Francisco Girl 

Many local admirers of Mile. Vir- 
ginia Marvin, who formerly conducted 
a dancing school in San Francisco, are 
keenly interested in her appearance 

with the Mordkin Ballet Russe, One 

of her special numbers which lias 
elicited praise from critics is the Rus- 
sian doll dance. "\\ anvk.i Tanyka." in 
which she dances with Marshansky. 

* * * 

St. Francis 

Ailolphe Menjou. probably one of 
the best liked villians of the screen, 
has been responsible (so 'us said) for 
much of the success of the D. VV. Grif- 
fith production. "Sorrows of Satan." 
filmed from Marie Corelli's novel, 
which has occupied the screen at the 
St. Francis Theater ever since the re- 
opening of the motion picture theater 



on Christmas Day. This is a Para- 
mount picture. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

Sessue Hayakawa, picture star, will 
appear in person at the Golden Gate 
Theater, corner of Taylor and Golden 
Gate Avenue, as the headliner of the 
week commencing with Saturday, 
January 8, in a one-act dramatic play- 
let, "The Bandit Prince." 

Dare and Wahl, comedy acrobats ; 
The Great Lester, ventriloquist, return- 
ing after an absence of two years; 
Johnny Murphy, monologist ; and those 
"Deerie Girls" are other vaudeville at- 
tractions. 

"Pals in Paradise" is the feature of 
the screen in the film version of a 
Peter B. Kyne Story, supported by 
John Bokers, Rudolph Schildkraut and 
May Robson. other cinema stars. 

* * * 
Cameo 

"The Ice Flood" will be screened at 
the popular Cameo Theater on Market 
Street, opposite Fifth, with Kenneth 
Harlan and Viola Dana in the thrill- 
ing picture taken from Johnstone Mc- 
Culley's vivid story, "The Brute," the 
showing- of this exciting love drama 
starting Saturday, January 8, and con- 
tinuing four days. 

Great forest lands, the beauty of the 
north in winter and a swiftly moving 
drama in which a man rescues a girl 
From a huge ice jam, are shown. 

"You'd Be Surprised" comes to the 
( ameo on Wednesday for a run of 
three days, with Raymond (irifrith. 
I lorothy Sebastian. Karle Williams and 

Edward Martindel the cast. 

* * * 
Warfield 

"Faust," the UFA production releas- 

ed through Metro -( ioldwyn - Mayer, 
which will be the screen feature at the 
Warfield Theater beginning Saturday, 
lanuarv S, is based on the E&JDOUS 
( loethe legend. 

Kmil Jannings of "Variety" fame 

appears in the role of Mephisto, the 
Spirit of Evil. Particular interest cen- 
ters around the appearance of Camilla 
Horn, considered a new screen discov- 
verv. She is onlj 20 years old. I iosta 
F.kman plays the title role. "Faust." 
William Dieterle takes the part of the 
heroine's brother. Valentine. 

Fanchon and Marco will ha\e as 
their stage idea this week "Dance 
Poems." with Carlose and Jinitte and 
Aid. i Kawanaki, the little Japanesi 
dancer, in featured parts. 

* * * 

California 

"The Nervous Wreck" will he 
ened at the California Theater this 
coming week, beginning with the Sat- 
urday performances. The picture was 
made from the Al Christie stage com- 
edy, featuring Harrison Ford in the 
leading part. 



Some say that the screen version 
surpasses the stage production and 
others contend that it could not. At 
any rate, one can see "The Nervous 
Wreck" with keen enjoyment and 
place his own comparisons, for com- 
edy-drama of this sort is always sure 
to create a lot of genuine fun. 
(Continued on Page 19f 




Sunset Way 
East 

• • scenic route through the southland 

East by way of Apache Trail, El 
Paso, and Juarez.historic San An- 
tonio, to New Orleans, colorful 
metropolis of the south. See the 
great Mardi Gras. 

Now travel east aboard world- 
famous Sunset Limited. Equip- 
ped and manned to delight the 
mostdiscriminating.Observation 
and club cars, Pullman comfort, 
Southern Pacific dining car service. 
Maid,barber,valet;shower-baths. 

Sunset Limited leaves here daily 
at 6:15 p. m. Tourist sleeper to 
Washington, D. C. over Sunset 
route; leaves 9:00 p.m. 

Also the Argonaut daily Los 
Angeles to New Orleans. Leave 
here 9:00 p.m. for connection. 

Southern 
Pacific 

Phone Davenport 4000 for all office* 

Ferry Building 65 Geary St. 

Third Street Station 

Oakland 

Phone Lakeside 1420 for information 

bureau and all offices 

13th and Broadway 16th Sr. Station 

1st and Broadway Station 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1927 





OGieT 





By Antoinette Arnold 



Calling Cards Again in Vogue 

THE calling card is again coming in t< > its own. Society, 
returning to the courteous custom of having "At 
Home" announcements, is also reviving the calling-card 
and the unsurplanted charm of the friendly or formal call. 

Telephones, automobiles and other progressive inven- 
tions have long been maligned as the cause for the cessation 
of calls. 

However, what may have been the reason for the ap- 
parently forgotten idea of calling upon one's friends, the 
delightful compliment is now being restored to its former 
claim and glory. 

1927 formally ushered into effect the pleasant plan cher- 
ished by our distinguished mothers and grandmothers be- 
fore there were any such things as telephones, and the new 
year is responsible in many instances for the re-establish- 
ment of the friendly call. 

Long-treasured memories certainly are cemented in the 
trail of calls, far beyond our way of reckoning. 

Who knows but that jewelers, designers and modistes 
keenly alert to every new notion in mi-lady's attire, may 
not already be planning modern, up-to-the-minute calling 
cards and the pretty calling-card cases which were formerly 
an indispensable part of a lady's wardrobe. 
Welcome the calling card! 
May it really be here to linger. 
* * * 

At Home 

Mrs. Milton Unger. who has just returned from a tour 
abroad, is one of the first San Francisco society women to 
re-inaugurate the New Year's "At Home." 

The reception and calling day held at the Sorosis Club 
rooms on Sutter street was the setting for a charming call- 
ing day, with many prominent members of the Novo Club 
assisting her in welcoming the guests, last Wednesday 
afternoon. 

Extending the courtesies of the new year and instilling 
much of the old-time custom, quite forgotten in the rush 
and whirl of many social amenities, the eventful "at home" 
was declared a most successful affair and the incentive for 
many other similar receptions, according to the expressions 
of opinion heard on all sides. 



The beautiful residence of Mrs. Graves Loller on Scott 
Street was the setting for a New Year's calling day when 
invited friends called to pay their homage and tribute to 
Mrs. Loller and to those who acted as assistant hostesses 
in welcoming the friends. Mrs. Rosetta Baker. Mrs Vdolph 
Siebrecht and Mrs. Benjamin A. Blair aided Mrs. Loller. 

* * * 
Titled Guest 

Baroness Ravensdale, the former Ladv Irene Curzon has 
been the guest of honor at any number of notable society 
affairs during the visit of the titled guest in California ' 



SANTA MARIA INN" 

Santa Maria, California 

h. Co..l Hijhw.y H.lfw.y Belween S.n Fr.nei.eo .„d Lo. An.ele, 
An Inn of Unoaaal Excellence 
Wirm or urn* for rotarvation* on your noxt trip touth 



Pretty Bride 

Miss Frieda Alpert was a beautiful bride whose youth 
and grace were comments among admiring friends when 
her wedding last Sunday night, December 26. was an event 
of local social circles. Miss Alpert, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Abraham Alpert, was married to Mr. Melville Wein- 
garten in the gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel. 

Rabbi Louis I. Newman read the marriage service before 
an altar of smilax and white and lavender chrysanthemums, 
flanked on either side with tall palms and ferns. An aisle 
of greenery led to the altar, the entire scene being reflected 
in the mirrors of the Fairmont Hotel. 

The bride was given in marriage by her father. She was 
attired in a white taffeta gown which enhanced her youth- 
ful beauty. The bouffant skirt and light bodice, with its 
Quaker collar, was a touch of naive charm. A long lace 
veil fell from her coiffure to the hem of her dress, and was 
held in place by orange blossoms. 
Maid of Honor 

Miss Sara Alford was the maid of honor, wearing a pink 
taffeta gown of the period design. She carried a shower 
bouquet of sweet peas and freesias. The bridesmaids were 
Misses Florence Rapport, Frances Levin, Lucile Rhein- 
stein. Selma Rheinstein, Marian Harris. Beryl Silberstein. 
Their gowns, all alike, were of the pastel shades made in 
the bouffant style. They each carried pink roses nestled in 
their arms. 

Norma Lucy Warren scattered rose petals in the path- 
way of the bride. John W'eingarten was the ring-bearer, who 
seemed to understand his part of the ceremony to a nicety. 
* * * 

Solos Before Ceremony 

Mrs. Jack W'eingarten of Los Angeles sang a group of 
appropriate songs just before the wedding ceremony. Din- 
ner and dancing followed the wedding attended by 150 
friends and relatives. ■ 

Upon their return from their honeymoon, Mr. and Mrs. 
W'eingarten will reside in San Francisco. 
Winter Pleasures * * * 

At Lake Tahoe 

Did you know that it is possible to take a sleeper in San 
Francisco, where the warm sunshine prevails, and step out 
the next morning into two feet of snow? 

Well, this remarkable transition is not only possible, but 
the popular diversion of Society just now. where hundreds 
of well known people from many parts of the state are 
spending their days at Tahoe Tavern, on the shores of Lake 
Tahoe, the scenic fairyland and landscape wonder of Cali- 
fornia. 

It only takes twelve hours to go from San Francisco to 
Lake Tahoe, where the glories of Switzerland in winter 
time are rivaled. Old pines, centuries old; the silver firs 
and the towering mountains behind the marvelous Lake 
Tahoe, are attractions one can never forget in beholding 
this great playground for skiing, toboganning sleiehintr 
skating and snow-lx" 



nailing. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

KM Bu.ta Street. Between Powell and Stockton. San Pr.not.ex> J 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




New Year's Fete 

Many of the old English customs were ob- 
served at Tahoe Tavern this year, the cos- 
tumed procession with the boar's head and the 
wassail bowl being part of the picturesque and 
impressive festivity. 

Great logs burned in the mammoth fireplace 
of the Tavern, when, at the stroke of midnight 
and the dawn of the new year the parade be- 
gan, followed by the merriment and significant 
jollifications. 

First came the Druids with the mistletoe, 
then the pages with the Yule log. Next came 
the lady with the peacock, Mrs. F. A. Denevell 
of San Francisco, who wore a costume of the 
period, bearing aloft in the palm of her hand 
a beautiful peacock. 

Then the pages entered with a garlanded 
boar's head upon a platter. 

The Knights of the Wassail Bowl followed, 
bearing aloft over their heads a huge bowl of 
the original wassail. 

The king and queen in formal court dress 
presided. After a formal dinner there was a 
fashion show featuring both men and women guests as the 
models of a winter sports style exhibit of the latest thing 
in sports apparel for the snow. 

Later a supper dance was held in the lounge with the 
guests seated at small candle-lit tables, the room illumi- 
nated by a blazing lire and lighted Christmas trees indoors 
and on the terrace. 

At 2 o'clock a breakfast of ham and eggs was served. 

Prominent Personages 

Prominent among those who spent New Year's at Tahoe 
Tavern were Mr. J. J. Baumgarten and a party of six; Mr. 
W. B. Brand and "a party of four; Mrs. George Dryer, who 
entertained six friends ; Mr, Alfred Ghirardelli, host to a 
party of four; Mrs. Wickham Haven.-, who had six friends 
in her party, and J. P. Smith, entertaining four in his party. 

Mr. A. S. Westphal had a large patty of twelve. Others 
who entertained groups of friends were; E. J. Zappentini, 
Mrs. F. 11. Cowdin, Miss Dorothj Curry, entertaining six 
fiends. Mr. Will Magee, Jr.. Mr. A. B, C. Dohrmann, E. 
11. S. Gregory, Dr. Fred II Kruse, 11. Dana Bowers, Col. 
I. \\ . Williams. Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Hellman of Los An- 
geles, entertaining a group of friends. 

Frank Miller. Laura Mathews. Miss Marjorie Day. M. II 
Sientzleman, Mrs. Elsie Brougher, Helen Gutschow, were 
among the enthusiastic merrymakers in sleighing and other 
diversions of winter sports at Lake Tahoe. 

Hon. James Phelan Host 
to Celebrities 

lion. James D. Phelan, former United Mate- Senator, 

entertained a group of friend- at his counjtrj place. Villa 
Montalvo, near Saratoga, during the holidays Senator and 
Mrs. Sanborn Young were prominent guests. ' (there enjoy- 
ing Mi. Phelan's hoapitalitj being: Messrs. and Mesdames 

Joseph D. Redding, C. W. Fay, E. J. Pringle, Harry Men- 
dell; Mesdames Shreve Badger of Chicago, Ednah Aiken. 
George E. Wells. Marie Well- Hanna. Gertrude Atherton. 
Harry Hill, Atherton Russell and the Ma--e- Rowena 
Mason, Dominga Russell, Mary Louise Phelan and Messrs. 
Covington Janin, George Russell, Louis Mulgardt, Clinton 
Mason and Col. Harry S. How land. 

* * * 
Engaged 

Miss Helen Mary Kiely of San Jose and San Francisco 
was hostess at a handsomely appointed tea on Monday. 
December 27, at the Fairmont Hotel, the Laurel Court being 
the setting for the smart affair. The quests were seated at 



HOTEL, CANTERBURY 
750 Suiter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

260 Rooms 
ates: From $2.50 per day 



a round table, charmingly decorated in roses 

and carnations. 

The place cards were cupids holding a rose, 
in the center of which was concealed the be- 
trothal card of the hostess and Mr. James 
David Power, whose wedding will be an event 
of early spring. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Phelan gave a party on 
Wednesday evening, December 22, to an- 
nounce the engagement of their daughter, Miss 
Marie Patricia Phelan, to Mr. John Joseph Sul- 
livan. 

The early part of the evening was spent in 
playing bridge and dancing. At midnight re- 
freshments were served at a prettily decorated 
table, and the place cards bore the engagement 
announcement. The Misses Abbie and Ethel 
Bryant, cousins of the bride-elect, assisted in 
receiving the guests. 



Big Bridge Party 

Everything is in readiness for the benefit 
bridge and mah jongg tea that will be given at 
the Fairmont Hotel on January 7 for the new Women's 
Building now in course of construction at Sutter and Mason 
streets. Practically every available table has been sold, the 
ballroom, red room and empire room taking care of the 
players. 

Mrs. Ira Kahn, chairman, and her committees have left 
nothing undone to make this a success. Home-made cakes 
will be served for the tea and candy sold. This party is the 
first of a series, and many members of the association who 
have been disappointed in obtaining tables at this affair 
may look forward to a similar party within a short time. 

The tea committee consists of Mrs. James Reid, Mrs. J. 
S. McCIymont, Mrs. Harry H. L. White, Mrs. E. P. Clay- 
burgh, Sirs. (Catherine Smith, Mrs. Corine Irving, Mrs. 
A 1\ m Scale, Mi-- Viola Roth, Mrs. Harold L. Seager, Mrs. 
David Hirshler, and fifty young women, members of the 
association and Berkeley and Stanford students, who will 
serve tea. 

The candy booth will be in charge of Mrs. Albert Raas, 
Mrs, George Bos, Mrs. Robert S. Atkins, Mrs. Butler Greer. 
Mrs. Norman F. Hall. Leonard Woolams, Jason Neilson, 
Mr.-. L'da Waldrop, Miss Sophie Clayburgh, Mrs. W. B. 
W'ellman and Mr-. Henry Boyen. 

I )n the card committee are Mrs. Christopher C. Barre, 
Mrs. Henry Westphal. Mrs. I >tto Westphal, Mrs. Henry 
Boyen, Mrs. Louise G. Range. Mrs. A. A. Reed. Mrs. J. E. 
Butterfield, Mr-. J. I. Goodday, Mr-. W. I. Gray. Mr-, 
lolin Brichetto, Mrs. Chas. S. Rosener, Mrs. Herbert Clay- 
burgh, Mrs. Maurice F. Kaufman and Mrs. David Schwei- 
/.er. 

The patronesses are Mrs. A. 1'. Gianninni, Mrs. Edward 
Dexter Knight. Mr-. D. E. F. Easton, Mrs. D. C. Hegen, 
Mr-. Gaillard Stoney, Mrs. A. W. Stokes, and Miss Jennie 

Partridge, 

* * * 

At Santa Maria Inn 

Tbe following people have been guests at the Inn during 
the past week : 

Mr.-. A. G. C. Halm of Menlo Park ami Mr-. John H. 
Mohlman of New York. 

Mr. Paul O. Tietzen of Berkelev. 

Mrs. J. W. Lilienthal ami Mr. J. W. Lilenthal. Jr., both of 
San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Y. Shirras of Kobe, Japan. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Bosqui of San Franci- 

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. T. Gartiot of Dubois. Wyoming. 

Mrs. lame- Goold of Oxford. England, accompanied by 
I Continued on Page 1 7 I 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 





C. J. Pennington 

Model 59 

AMERICAN radio receivers lead 
the world, in appearance as well 
as in efficiency. That fact is univers- 
ally recognized, and the outstanding 
factor in the supremacy of American 
sets is extraordinary reproduction and 
simplicity of control. 

Millions of dollars have been spent 
in laboratory research. Vast improve- 
ments have been made in the past few 
years. The day of the nondescript 
radio apparatus has passed. There was 
a time when the assemblage of parts 
loosely put together would pass for a 
radio set, just because it did bring in a 
station or two, but it was almost over- 
night that the demand came from the 
general public for receivers which 
manufacturers could hardly meet for a 
considerable period of time. 

Gone are those days and we have at- 
tained in the radio field a degree of per- 
fection as well as quantity. It is every 
set owner's desire to have a set with 
perfect tone quality and simplicity of 
operation, and the great strides recent- 
ly made in sound receiving have for 
some time been available in radio 
broadcasting, but it lias remained for 
one company alone to make them avail- 
able in radio reception by the com- 
bination of both horn and "cone speak- 
ers. 

The Reichman Company of Chicago 
are deserving of special mention for 
the reason of their pioneering in re- 
production. They have placed on the 
market recently their model 59 Thorola 
receiver, which incorporates both the 
horn and cone speakers combined in 
one cabinet and working in unison, giv- 
ing reproduction which is almost with- 
out a peer. 

The Thorola set is of the tuned radio 
frequency type, employing five tubes, 



with the power tube in the last stage 
of the audio frequency. It is equipped 
with doughnut coils, which give selec- 
tivity, and distant stations may be 
heard equally as well while local is on, 
as it is when off. 

The reproduction of the Thorola 
model 59 is the last word in radio re- 
ception. By the use of the horn and 
cone in series, no note high or low is 
lost to the human ear. This has been 
especially proven true in the reception 
of symphony concerts, which are at 
present being broadcast. If one desires 
to enjoy music as it is played, it should 
be heard from the model 59 Thorola. 
This new arrangement bridges the gap 
between musician and music lover that 
has been lacking in past performances 
of radio reception, due to inability to 
hear all notes which are sent out on 
the air. 

The day is past when performance is 
the only thing that the public requires 
of a radio set. The greatest develop- 
ment in radio during the last few 
months is the fact that it is being dealt 
with now as a thing of beauty both in 
performance and appearance. Both of 
these qualities the Thorola model 59 
possesses. There has been no drastic 
change in either the reproducers or the 
speakers, but what changes have been 
made have been for better reproduc- 
tinii and minor refinements. 

Thorola radios because of their sci- 
entific construction and because they 
embody the most advanced radio engi- 
neering, will bring to you the best in 
reproduction. By all means, hear the 
Thorola model 59 and be convinced of 
its sterling qualities and worth as a 
radio receiver and reproducer of music. 



Radio Laws for 1927 

Although progress is reported by the 
conferees on the radio legislation," it is 
deemed unlikely they will be able to 
report out a bill— or if there is a dis- 
agreement to definitely come to this 
conclusion— until well into 1927, ac- 
cording to reports from Washington. 
Congress will be back on the job after 
the Christmas holidays, Monday, Jan. 
3, and in the meantime it may safely be 
said Senator Bill (Dem.) of Washing- 
ton, author of the Dill bill, which has 
been passed by the Senate, and Repre- 
sentative Wallace H. White Jr. (Rep ) 
sponsor of the White bill, approved by 
the House, are giving much thought to 
the matter for the further considera- 
tion of the Conference Committee as a 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 
Sunday, January « 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — Weather forecast and general in- 
formation. 

2:40 to 4:15 p. m. — Concert of the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion ot Alfrea Hertz, broadcast by ivPO. 
KGO and KF1, 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

6:30 p. m. — General information. 

6:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8:35 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:110 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Monday, Jnnuary 10 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading 
and weather forecast. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

s x : 1 o p. m . — Chamber of Commerce talk. 

8:10 to S:25 p. m. — Book reviews. 

8:25 to 9:00 a. m. — Bridge lesson No. 12. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Billy Long's Cabirlans 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — KPO Variety Hour. 

Tuesday. January 11 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Dally Health Drill 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- I 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.^'Uda Waldrop Hour." 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Billy Long's Cabirlans. 

Wednesday, January 12 

?A 4 L 7:15 ' 7:45 a ' m - — Daily Health Drill, 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk 

12:00 noon— Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

l:0ti to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- ' 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour 

'I'll \° Vil p - "a.— Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8":00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Atwater Kent Artists 

9:00 f. 10:00 p. m.— Studiu program 

1":"" to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Thursday, January 13 

5;, 4 L 7:15 ' 7: i§ »• m.— Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:0u p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8 to 10:00 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 

10:011 to 11:iiii p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

Hun to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Friday, Janunry 14 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion Talk. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing-. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Clut>. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel . Concert 
Orches t ra 

3:30 to 5:30* p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

fi;15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

tf:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 
20 to 7:30 p. m. — "Sports on the air." 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — DX, 

Mini to 10:00 p. m. — Walt.r Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

£1:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Saturday. January 15 

fi:45. 7:15, 7:45 a. m.— Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 
mi to 9; no p. m. — Simultaneous broadcast 
by KPO and KPI. 

10: 1 r. a. m, — Cooking bints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

inn to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

8380 to 5:3n p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8MB to 6:30 p. m.— Stock market quotations. 

6*80 to 7:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches 
tra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

~:nii to 10:00 p. m.— Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

t0:OO t.. linn a. m.— Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
chest ra. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Dalit Kxcept Sunday 

nn i,, 11:30 a. m.— Vocal and Instrumental 
Selections. 

4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 



KGTT — GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLR, s\\ 
PRANCISCO— 307 

Sunday. January II 

B80 i- 3:00 p. m, — Sunday school, 

Btf O to 6:00 p. m.- — Temple service. 

8:00 to in ;00 p. m.- \'.\. en I n ■■ bi r i li ■ 

Momlay, January lO 

1 2::: ii i o l :00 p, m.- — Daily Scripture reading 

TuPMdny, January 11 

i " 30 to i no p. m. — Dally s.-i Ipi lire i i-ading 

8:00 io 10:00 p. in. — Studio program, 

\\ edneNilny, January 12 

18:30 to l :i'ii p m.— Daily Scripture reading 
8:30 tn 1:00 p. in. — Divine healing servb 
s nn to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program 

Tliiirs<iu> . January 13 

i 10 to 1 nn p. m. — I »:» t 1 > Scriptu itdinK 

Bfetda? . January i t 

i " :.n io 1 on p, in.— 1 ►ally Script ur« i 
BtOO to 10:00 p m. — Stu llo progi am 

■ I i nn ,, m Sunshine houi . 

Saturday ( Jaauary III 

tu i nn p mi. — i» ;t ily Scripture reading. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 

Munlay, January U 

11:00 a m ■ -Triti it > Episcopal Churcl 

isco. 
1:40 p. in.-- San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra co ctlon of Alfred 1 1 

P in — Bern's Symphony «■ 
t ra 

7:30 p. m-- Weather bureau report 
p m. — Trinity i' ; 
San Francisco. 

p m, — Hems Symphony Orches- 
tra. 

Monday, Janunr> 10 

m. — N \ StOCk reports. 



:37 p. m.— S. F. Stock reports. 

l''il , p - "I— Weather Bureau reports. 

'.aX \° 4 i°L p - m-— Hotel Leamington Concert. 

4:00 to 5:00 p. m.— California Federation of 
Women s Clubs. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies' Klub 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m.-Bem's Little Symphony. 

d:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing) 

7:21 p. m, — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Tuesday, Janunry 11 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

4:00 p. m. — Housekeeper's chat. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

C:55 p. m. — News items. 

T:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 
Pilgrims." 

9:00 p. m. — "Chats About New Books," 

Wednesday, January IS 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

:::00 to 4:iin p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 

4:00 p. m. — Housekeeper's chat. 

5:30 p. m. — "For instance," by General Jack- 
son. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — ,S. F. Produce. Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:11 p. ni . — k y. Stock reports (closing). 

i :21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 p. m. — (S. F. studio) Farm Program. 

8:10 p. m. — (Series) "The Cattle Industry." 

8:20 p. m. — An interview with the Agricul- 
tural Economist. 

8:80 p. m.— W.O.W.Male Trio. 

8:40 p, m. — Address. 

8:40 p, m.— Address, "The Railroad Commis- 
sion and the Farmer.'' 

9:00 i). no. — W. i). w. Male Trio. 

Thur*<lny, .Inniinrr 13 

1:30 p. m.— N. Y. Stocks. 

1:37 p. m.— S. F. Stocks. 

L:42 p. m. — Weather. 

i:nu p, mi, — Housekeepers' chat 

.Vim to 6:00 p. m. — George W. Ludlow, '.'Friend 

i o Hoys." 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:55 p. m. — News. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather. 
7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce. 
7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stocks (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program by Arlon Trio. 

KGO studio start", and the KGO Minstrels. 
:< :'.n to : j 00 p. m. — Phil Lampkln's Musical 

Bea rs 

l'rhiii.t. January < < 

» 1 :10 a. m. — Homemaklng Talk. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:87 p, m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

i 4:' p m - Weather Bureau reports. 

3 nn in t p. m — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

1:00 p. m - Houm k. . p. i >- , hat. 

p. tn. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:08 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
. mi; ,, in s P. Produce, Grain, Cotton, an-l 

■ lis 

7 11 p m N Y Stock reports (closing). 

7-1 p. in S !-" stock reports (closing). 

n -in (,. :» iu> p. in — tS. F. St in hoi Program 

Hararday« Janaar? 15 

S Weather Bureau report. 
i> in N Y Stocks 
t _■ pi ,, m — s 1-" Stocks 

I nn to t 00 p. in. — Hotel Leamington Concert, 
m. — Houa hat. 

tn Weekly Pporl Review," by Al 
Santi 
g:l6 to :* IG p m, — Program from the Hotel 
Leamington. 

;t 16 p. in to 1:00 a. m. — Wilt GunzendorfVr s 

I dance music. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE. OAK- 
LAND— 509 

Mouiln > . January lO 

9 7 :30 p. m. — News Broadcast. 
9:00 p. m — Studio program. 

DC p m — Wei kly meeting Lake 

I t Pucks. 

Iiie<.i1n>. January 11 

T.rtO to 7:10 p. m, — Xe^s 1 : oadcast. 
\\ I'dnc-tlnv, January U 




Hotee Mark Hopkins 

San Franchsco 's smarted rendezvous . . . 
■where fddie Harkness and his Orchestra have 
won the hearts of the city 's smart set! 

TEA 1>ANSANT' Monday and Saturday 
Afternoons, four 'til six, One Dollar. 

CONCERT TEA ,Tues., Wed.,Thur..Fn. 
Afternoons, four 'til six, Fifty Cents. 

D/NNZ!RlMNCE,Ni£htly(exceptSun.) 
seven 'til nine. Table d'Hote, Two-fifty. 
No Couvert for Dinner Guests. 

SUPPER T>ANCE , Nightly (except Sun.) 
nine 'til one. Couvert Tifty Cents; Satur- 
day. Couvert One Dollar. 

Qmm by Viffor 




Jollow the 

Qolden Ttoad 

to Health! 



Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 6:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



January 8, 1927 



6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 

Thursday, January 13 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday, January 14 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
S:00 to 9:30 p. m. — Program. 
9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Or- 
chestra. 
Saturday, January 15 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday, January U 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday School Les- 
son. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Sacred songs. 

Monday, aJnuary 10 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
Wednesday, January 12 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
s:00 p. m. — .Sacred songs. 

Thursday, January 13 

2:00 to 3 p. m. — Telephone or write in your 
health questions and they will be informal- 
ly discussed. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sacred variety program. 

Friday, January 14 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Bible Study Hour. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sacred Variety Program. 

8:00 p. m. — telephone or write in your nealth 
questions and they will be informally dis- 
cussed. 

Saturday, January 15 

1:30 to 2:30 p. m. — Children's Church Broad- 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
Forecast: (b> Announcements of Churches 
for Sunday. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 

Sunday, January u 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Prof. A. E. Linsley's Bible 

class. 
11:00 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
7:45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 

Monday, January 10 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 tn 10:00 p. m. — Slavic music by Robert 
Rourke, violinist. 

Tuesday, January 11 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 

Stamp Collectors. 
S:15 to 10:00 p. m. — The KTAB Quartet. 

Wednesday. January 12 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Part I. Women's Chorus; 
Part II. Instrumental Trio. 

Thursday, January 13 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

Friday, January 14 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Oden and Richard's Ha- 
waiian Troupe. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Goat Island Goats. 

Saturday, January 15 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND— 491.5 

Sunday, January 

10:55 to 12:30 p. m. — Morning- services. 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Monday, January 10 

7:15 a. m. — Y.M.C.A. setting up exercises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's Program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
8:00 to S:30 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
s:30 to 9:15 p. m. — Portland Symphony Or- 
chestra. 
9:15 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, January 11 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health Exer- 
cises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Wednesday, January 12 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:40 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Thursday, Junuary 13 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 

6:00 i" 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility Service. 

7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment 

Friday, January 14 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health exer- 
cises. 

L0:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m.— Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Weekly meeting of the 
KGW Movie Club. 

8:30 to 10:30 p. m.- — Dance music. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m.- — Keep Growing Wiser Or- 
der of Hoot Owls. 

Saturday, January 15 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather report. 

■,;,,,, (,, m. mi p. m. — Concert. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KFI- 



■EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 



{Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 
Sunday, January u 

10:00 a. m. — Church Services under direction 
of L. A. Church Federation. 

11:00 a. m. — Third Church of Christ .Scientist 
services. 

2:45 p. m. — Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia presents San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. Alfred Hertz, Conductor; broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI, KPO, KGO. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat and 
Father Ricard's Sun Spot weather forecast. 

7:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital; Alex 
Reilly at the console. 

8:00 p. m. — Packard Classic Hour. 

9:00 p. m. — Bob Bottger and his Venetians 
Dance Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill 
Hennessy, Director; Dolly MacDonald, So- 
loist. 

Monday, January 10 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Furnishings for the 
Home by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m.— Food Talks by Agnes 
White. 

5:30 p. m. — The Varsity Club Orchestra — Bill 
Stewart, Director. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 



6:20 p. m. — George Wilder Cartwright, talks 

on the Constitution. 
6:35 p. m. — Marta Evarts Orchestra, Kenneth 

Price, soloist. 
7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians 

Starke Sisters (Minnie and Maude). 
8:00 p. m. — Popular program. 
9:00 p. m. — Program of concert music. 
10.00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, January 11 

5:30 p. m. — Jack Murray's Italian Village Or- 
chestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — Dr. John T. Miller, "Human Na- 
ture Around the World." 

6:35 p. m. — Velma Wood, concert pianist. 

7:00 p. m. — Paul Howard's Quality Seren 
aders. 

8:00 p. m. — Screen Artists' Quartet, Emma 
Kimmel, soprano. 

9:00 p. m. — Gertrude KoehiMng, contralto. 

10:00 p. m. — Azure Music Club, Clarice Etui 
sell, blues singer; Betty Colston and Bill 
Parker, Esther Walker, pianist. 

Wednesday, January 12 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on Child Training 
by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 

ll:ln to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnel 
White. 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee program. 

6:00 p. m.— KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians. 

7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris, Detective Stories; 

8:00 p. m. — California Petroleum Corporation 
Program — Virginia Flohri. 

9:00 p. m. — Semi-classical hour. 

10:00 p. m. — Sunset Instrumental Quartet — 
Dorothy Ruth Miller, pianist; Ernest Bur- 
ley, tenor. 

Thursday, January 13 

5:30 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by University of South- 
ern California. 

8:00 p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 

9:00 p. m. — Leslie Adams and Dean Metcalf. 

10:00 p. m. — Johnston & Farrell's Music Box 
Hour — Direction of Gene Johnston, with 
Jim. Jack and Gene Trio, including the five 
bad boys. 

Friday, January 14 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on furnishing for 
the home by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — .Betty Crocker. Gold 
Medal Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to U:30— Food Talks by Agnes White, 
m. — Matinee program, 
m. — KFI Nightly Doings, 
m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period, 
m. — Vest Pocket Period, 
m. — Program by Paul Roburts. 
m. — Felipe Delgado, Media Hora Es- 
pagnola. 

S:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Alex Reil- 
ly at the console. 

9:00 p. m. — Alma Frances Gordon, contralto. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour; J. Maurice 
Woods, baritone. 



5:30 


p. 


6:00 


P 


6:10 


P. 


6:20 


P 


ti::<b 


P 


7:00 


p. 


V:30 


P 




January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



10:30 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour — Edna 
Bilea; J. Maurice Woods, Baritone. 

Saturday, January 15 

6:30 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Angeleno Ag- 

gravators. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
p. m. — Radiotorial Period, 
p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 
p. m. — Instrumental music. 
p. m. — Mission Bell Orchestra; Chico De 
Verde, director, Eva Olivotti, Ray Harmon 
on a program by the Los Angeles Soap Co. 
:00 p. m. — Popular Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club — Esther 
Walker, pianist; Ruth Davis, blues singer; 
Helen Guest. 
11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 



:10 
6:20 



:00 
:00 



KNX-LA. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

Dully Except Sunday 

7:30 a. m. — KNX Morning Gym. 
:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

8:55 a. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 a. m. — Chopping News. 

10:30 a. m. — Household Economics except Fri- 
day and Saturday. 

12:00 m. — George Redmond's Orchestra. 
:00 p. m. — Musical program — except Satur- 
day. 

4:55 p. m.— Market reports. 

6:30 p. m.- — George Redmond's Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

6:15 p. m. — W. F. Alder Travelogue. 

>:3G p. m. — Atwater Kent orchestra. 

Sunday. January 9 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
6:30 p. m. — Hollywood Unitarian Church. 
:00 p. m. — -1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
9:00 p. m. — Feature Program. 



Monday* January 10 

3:00 p. m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 
4:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 
4:30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
7:30 p. m. — Playlet. 
8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
lii:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
11 :00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Tuesday, January 11 

3:00 p. m. — Combined program by Police and 

Fire Depts. 
4:00 p. m. — Radio matinee. 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 
S:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Wednesday, January 12 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Thursday, January 13 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

* ;00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

lii:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11 :00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

i-'ridny, January 14 

3:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

S:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program, 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Saturday, January 15 

3:00 p. m. — The Town Crier of the Day and 

his pals. 
7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 



7:16 p. m.— Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices of the leading Los Angeles churches. 

7:30 p. m, — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — Saturday night frolic from the 
studio of KNX. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Sunday, January 9 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Monday, January 10 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :50 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
spersed with musical numbers. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring Ken- 
neth Gillum, popular songs. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and His Or- 
chestra. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tuesday, January 11 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — ■"Where to go and what 
to buy." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Fran- 
ces St. George. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his Or- 
chestra. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Babe Brown and his 
Ukelele. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday, January 12 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sun- 
shine. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what 
to buy." 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News Items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring Ann 
Grey blues. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



In justice to your pocket- 
book and to your reputa- 
tion as a judge of radio, 
please do one thing be- 
fore deciding upon any 
radio set : 




Model 59 
Price $195.00 Without Accessories 

Other Models $6 5.00 and up 



Hear the Thorola Model 
59 at any of our stores. 
It is absolutely the only 
way to be sure that your 
radio will be the very 
latest. 



250 Stockton Street 



WurlTIzer 

2345 Mission Street 1543 Ocean Avenue 

Oaki ind— 575 14th Street \nd 3351 Grand Avenue 



BERKELEY — 2223 rtLBGKAPH AvEXL'E 



RiCHMONtv— 913 MxcDoxaid Avenue 



4567 Mission Street 



S IM Akselmo — 300 Mais' Street 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



January 8, 1927 



9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 
10:00 p. itl — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thursday, January 13 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 
7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what to 

buy." 
7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his orches- 

9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Edward Novis, baritone. 
10:10 p. m.- — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, January 14 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 
7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what to 

buy." 
7:60 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 
8:0C to 9:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his Or- 

9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Kenneth Gillum, popular 

songs. 
10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday, January 15 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — "Where to go and what to 

buy." 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring June 

Parker, blues. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Peggy Mathews, blues. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 



KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 
SEATTLE— 384.4 

Sunday, January 9 

11:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening Service. 
9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under direction 
of Henry Damskl. 

Monday, January 10 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

10:80 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, January 11 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Wednesday, January 12 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Thursday. January 13 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
11:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 

Friday, January 14 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Saturday, January 15 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 



6:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday, January 

11:00 a. m. — Service from First Baptist 

Church. 
6:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
7:15 p. m. — Evening service. 

Monday, January 10 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

1:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Children's hour. 

8:00 p. m.- — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday, January 11 

11 :45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk, Interior Decorating. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m.— Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m, — Farm question box. 

9:00 p. m. — Instruction in Auction Bridge. 

AVedneMday, January 12 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 
7:30 p. m. — Wynken, Blynken and Nod. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
8:15 p. m. — .Studio program. 

Thursday, January 13 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. "Interior Decorating," 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:4 5 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

Friday, January 14 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Instrumental Concert. 

1:00 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk, "Interior Decorating." 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion Review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m, — Preview of International Sunday 

school lesson. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:30 p. m. — "The Christmas Carol." 

Saturday, January 15 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
10:30 p. m. — Dance program. 



KRE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 

Sunday. January 1> 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Church Service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner Concert. 
8:15 to 9:00 p. m. — Social concert. 

Monday, January 10 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday, January 11 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Wednesday, January 12 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 
5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

Thursday. January 13 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, January 34 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Saturday, January 15 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance program 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 10) 

whole, Messrs. Dill and White having 
been constituted a sub-committee to 
bring in conciliatory recommendations. 
The main point of discussion is that 
the Dill bill would give radio control 
to an independent commission and th 
White bill to Secretary Hoover with 
the aid of an advisory commission. 

Not Too Much Time 

Congress will reconvene after ils 
holiday recess Monday, Jan. 3. Two 
months later — which is nut a long 
period of time, for the grist mill of 
legislative matters grinds slowly — 
March 4, the present Congress will ex- 
pire. 

If by any chance an extra session 
should materialize, then there might be 
time for an entirely new bill if the con- 
ferees should disagree. If, however, 
March 4 arrives, and the Conference 
Committee appears to be going on the 
rocks with no extra session in sight, 
doubtless emergency legislation would 
be rushed through to tide over the 
Summer. 

Washington observers believe that 
this might take the form of the White 
resolution to temporarily cut off the 
licensing of more stations or be some- 
thing like the Copeland or Dickstein 
resolutions to restore Secretary Hoi » eij 
to control for the time beingf. 



Originality 

Frightens the Old Fashioned 
It Pleases 

The Modern Advertiser 

Let Me Write Your Advertisements, 
Publicity or Sales Letters 

Address: E. Ross, 268 Market Street 
Room 101 



CLUB 
Auto Service Co. 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxlcab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



685 Post St. 
San Francisco 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

\U-Expense Tour, Personally Conducted by W. F. Alder, 
Noted Traveler 

THIRTY-FIVE days, 7,000 miles and seven countries — 
that in brief is the story of the Evening Express Winter 
Tropical Cruise that starts February 21, 1927, for "The 
Lands Between" the two American continents, yet it is en- 
rely inadequate to convey the scenic wonders, quaint cities 
ind strange peoples to be seen in Central America or the 
uxurious playgrounds of the wealthy in the Southeast to 
je visited on the second stage of the trip. 

This first cruise of its kind, conducted by the Evening 
ixpress, is an all-expense personally conducted tour and 
he first half will be in personal charge of W. F. Alder, 
orld-famed traveler and author, whose lectures on travel 
>ver Radio KNX are a daily entertainment feature. The 
oarty, limited to 100 people to insure comfort and plenty 
)f room aboard ship, leaves San Francisco Feb. 19 and Los 
A.ngeles Harbor Feb. 21 on the palatial Panama Mail Steam- 
hip Company steamship Colombia. 

Stop at Manzanilla 
The first stop, after sailing over the golden, tropical sea 
dong the coast of Lower California, will be at Manzanillo, 
VIexico, for sightseeing in that quaint city. Another coun- 
:ry will be visited when the second stop is made at San Jose 
le Guatemala, where a special train will be waiting to take 
Jie party to Guatemala City, one of the most picturesque 
nountain cities in the world. 

The third stop will be at Acajutla, San Salvador, where 
tropical vegetation and foliage is seen in its utmost mag- 
lifieence. An even better opportunity to see it and the 
reat coffee plantations will be afforded when the Colombia 
Ttops at La Libertad, in the same country, and a wonderful 
rftotor trip is taken into the mountains to San Salvador 
L'ity, situated at an elevation of 2500 feet. Next Corinto, 
Nicaragua, in still another country, will he visited. 

So many things have been told and read concerning the 
Panama Canal Zone that little additional is needed to whet 
:he appetite for this great engineering feat, or tor the \ i>its 
:o the native cities in the Canal /.one that are so quaint and 
Hispoiled. Ample time will he allowed at Balboa and Pau- 
lina City, with automobile rides to all points of interest. 
Ittd even luncheon on the deck of the steamer while pass- 
ng through the canal, so that no detail of operation will be 
nisscd. 

Interesting trips will be made through the old Spanish 
:ities of Cristobal and Colon, and then in the Caribbean sea. 
where so much of the world's romance, conquest ami ad- 
venture has taken place, the party will set forth for Cuba. 
Five Days in Havana 
Five days will he spent in Havana, with the Hotel Plaza 

| headquarters, and there will he continuous sightseeing 
n this far-famed tropical isle, visiting the various pleasure 
resorts as well as the industries that have raised Cuba to a 

Jiigh place in the commercial world. Then to Ke) West, 
i I . . by boat, thence In train for Miami. 

\ Santa Fe tour conductor will relieve Mr. Alder at this 
point, and will arrange for the automobile tours all about 
the city and environs. At Palm Beach the party will find 
surf bathing and sightseeing galore, while the next stop. 
at New < Means, reached by special train, will place the 
party in one of the most romantic and colorful cities of the 
United States. 

The famous Hotel St. Charles (there has heen a St. 
Charles in New Orleans since the days of the first Creole- J 
will be headquarters. Touring cars of the best makes will 
be available for sightseeing tours about the city, although 
the picturesque and historic old French quarter will attract 



those who would search out the many spots of interest afoot. 
And then there will be a special dinner for the party at the 
world-famous "La Louisiane" cafe, where epicures, perhaps 
the parents or grandparents of the travelers, in years past 
toasted the skill of Antoine, the founder, and where his 
son today maintains the traditions of the proud old family. 
Two days' sightseeing at the Grand canyon of the Color- 
ado, during which time the party will stop at El Tovar Ho- 
tel, will constitute the last stop of the trip, after which the 
special train will return to Los Angeles, arriving about 
March 30. 

Party Will Be Limited 

The entire cost of the trip can be included within $675, 
although for those who desire the unusual luxuries pro- 
vision has been made at slightly higher prices. The party 
will be limited, which not only assures plenty of room for 
deck sports while aboard the S. S. Colombia, but also that 
there will be but one "sitting" at table, and insurance of 
most pleasing conditions aboard ship. Every convenience 
is provided by the steamship company, even to a doctor 
and surgeon. 

Details of the tour and reservations may be made at the 
Evening Express Resort and Travel Bureau, 24 Mercan- 
tile Arcade, all railroad or steamship agents, and the Pan- 
ama Mail Steamship Company, No. 2 Pine St., San Fran- 
cisco. 



The firm that exploded the celebrated chests of tea that 
figured in the Boston Tea Party is still doing business. 
* * * 

Semaphore and wigwag signaling, which has been used 
since 260 B. C, is to be discontinued in the United States 
Army. Developments in radio and telegraphic communi- 
cations have rendered it unnecessarv. 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8C DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1(71 



ERNEST F. RIXON, Qeneral oAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephona Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1927 



Finance 



STOCK of the Western Apex Mining Company of Oat- 
man will be called on the San Francisco Stock Exchange 
next week, the listing committee having already approved 
the listing of the stock. 

* * * 

— The possibility of making a high grade fuel from the 
enormous deposits of lignite in the United States, compris- 
ing nearly one third of the total solid fuel resources of the 
nation, is demonstrated by the Bureau of Mines. Depart- 
ment of Commerce, using a cheap process for carbonizing 
the raw lignite and subsequently briquetting the resulting 
char. 

* * * 

— The advice given by the Executive Manager of the Na- 
tional Association of Credit Men is to pay less attention to 
volume and more to overhead. To keep prices and profits 
right, overhead must be right. Volume may act even to re- 
duce profits. Profits in their essence proceed from careful 
handling of overhead. 



— The statement issued by the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany showing the number of conventions already arranged 
for, for the coming year is very impressive. It shows how 
important the convention matter has become and how ad- 
vantageous it is for a city management to be able to swing 
into the city some of the most important of these many 
conventions. The effect upon retail trade is marked. 



— The ultimate use of the diamond drill for the oil fields 
depends, says the Bureau of Mining, upon an estimate of 
its comparative cost with cable or rotary tools. There are 
no good statistics so far, upon which the relative cost of the 
diamond drill can be properly predicated. Its cost depends 
upon the two main items of the cost of machinery and the 
amount invested in carbons. 



— A survey of the construction industry shows a larger 
number of hotels being built on the Pacific Coast than ever 
before. This is a clear proof of the growing tourist travel 
to the Coast. The results of various national conventions 
held in California is beginning to show itself in an increasing 
demand for tickets to this state, says the passenger Traffic 
Manager of the Southern Pacific Company. 

* * * 

— There has been an unauthoribed dealing in stocks this 
Christmas, according to the statement of the State Corpora- 
tion Department. Engraved stock certificates have been 
sent through the mails accompanied by a demand for nv mey. 
This is in violation of the blue sky law, as there has been 
in this particular case no permit. A drastic investigation 
is on foot. 

* * * 

— New Year's day found the Pacific Gas and Electric- 
Company busy on four big hydro-electric jobs. Hydraulic 
machinery was being set in the foundations of the Melones 
power-house; a hundred miles to the North of that, workers 
were starting upon the enlargement of the Spaulding and 
Drum developments ; in the Cascades, near the Modoc lava 
beds, men were working in the cold on the facings of the 
new Pit River dam. Thus the great power svstem of the 
State is being developed. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,550,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $565,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Ilaiuht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J .,) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




San Frnnciaco, Calif. 
444 Market Street 



Loa Angelea, Calif. 
S717 Santa Fe Avenue 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 920.0O0.0OO Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.: SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Aflat. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer i of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 
FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C.P. A. 

Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



Book- 
Slow 



W. W. HEALEY 
NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Building (Opposite Palace Hotel), San Frnnciaco 
Phone Kearny 391 



fanuary 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9} 
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Mortimer of Pasadena. 

Mrs. J. J. Baunigartner, Miss D. Pulliam and Mr. J. }. 
3aumgartner, Jr., all of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. Graves of Spokane, Washington. 
Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Hamilton of Oakland. 
Mr. E. D. Lederman of San Francisco and Mr. W. R. 
Xnack of Alameda. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Butler of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. R. M. J. Armstrong of San Francisco. 
Mrs. S. B. Welch of Berkeley and Mrs. French of San 
rancisco. 

Mrs. J. R. Christy and M'r. R. E. Christy, both of Ala- 
neda. 
Mr. and Mrs. George M. Pinckard of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert J. O'Brien of San Francisco. 
Mr. George W. Kleiser, Jr., of Hillsborough, and Mr. 
\lfred E. Hammersmith of San Francisco. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Wayne Higson and Mr. Ambrose F. 
idwards, Jr.. all of Oakland. 
Mr. and Airs. Henry Kiersted of San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Symes of Oakland, California. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ferris Moulton of Oakland. 
Mrs. Peter B. Kyne of Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Greene of Oakland. 

* * * 

Wedding Day Announced 

Miss Pauline Clagstone, whose engagement to Mr. Harold 
Edmonson of Santa Barbara was recently announced, has 
iosen Saturday, February 26, as the day of her wedding 
J! be held in St. Matthew's Church, San Mateo, where the 
bride was christened and where her parents were married. 

Mrs. George McDonald, nee Frances Pringle, will be 
matron of honor. Miss Catherine Vail, Miss Fredericka 
Sans <>f Santa Barbara, Miss Marie Richardson of Berkeley 
mil Miss Kathryn Montanva of Woodside are to be the 
:>ther attendants in the bridal party. 

* * * 

Mrs. Francis II. Davis has returned to San Francisco for 
:he winter, having closed her beautiful home in the Santa 
~ruz mountains. She has taken rooms at the Fairmont 
I Intel, where she always resides when in the city. Her 
xmntry home is noted fur its hospitality and is one of the 

favorite rendezvous fur a large circle of friends. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Barnes, from Pasadena, have come up 
rom the Southland and intend to make San Francisco their 
feme for an indefinite period. They arc at the Fairmont 
Hotel. Mrs. I'.. irncs is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 

aunt, prominent societ) people of Pasadena and Los 
Vngeles. 

* * * 

\rt Lecture 

The San Francisco Society nf Women Artists will assem- 
>le mi Thursday, January 13, in the clubrooms of the 
Women's City Club, Post street near Powell, to hear a 
ecture by F. Spencer Macky, who will talk on Modern Art 
Vlovements. 

Mr. Mackj has just returned from abroad, where lie made 
m intensive study on the trend of modern art in some of the 
argest European cities. 

A business session will l>e held on Thursday at 2 o'clock, 
list preceding the lecture, for the purpose of electing a 
ur\ and hanging committee for the Annual Exhibition, 
vhiih is to take place in March. 

Mrs John Met law. prominent in art and musical circles. 
vho recently returned from a trip abroad, is one of the 
eading members of the Society of Women \rtists. 

* *' * 

Brilliant Talk By Dramatic Critic 
Fditli Bristol, dramatic critic of "The Call," was the 
( Continued on Page 1S1 



pan Franrisro Stonifl! Company prospect 6 ? 
STORAGE !" 

MW1M/. PACKING. SHIPPING 

lit SUTTER !A'«i HVOt I lUYENWORTH STS. j | — 




11 i-^-wwawim 




■fK~ "1|ourpalnfe? r * , 

agns 



Tel. Davenport 4980 

655 SACRAMENTO ST. 

Between Montgomery and 

Kearny Streets 

San Francisco, Calif. 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

434 Post Strut, San Tvanciico, Calif. 



Make yourself at home at 

GEORGE HARGEN'S OLD BOOK SHOP 

No. 2 Tlllmann Place, at 241 Grant Avenue 

The Home of the Book Lover 

Rare Books — First Editions — Pine Bindings 

Importations from Zachnsdorf, Root, Morrell, etc., of London 

Commissions in London Executed 

Single Books and Libraries Purchased 

Phone Kearny 5816 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL, ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

'/hosUfeaf Shirts nKosEKsmi 

^kW *-*«» ^kw 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



i83 Po»t Strut 
In VhbOIU Ho™. 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cteaninf 



San Fkakciic* 
Phqnb Frahkum 2514 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Eatabllahed 1804 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

S5S TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Donflaa 3084 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street, Bet. 18th and 19th SU., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1927 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 17) 
honor guest and speaker at a special meeting held by the 
Press chairman of the San Francisco City and County Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs last Wednesday morning, in the 
green room of the Fairmont Hotel. 

With characteristic brilliancy and deep appreciation of 
the profession she represents. Mrs. Bristol outlined her 
methods in securing stories for large newspapers and de- 
fined manv outstanding experiences in her newspaper 
career. He'r address was especially illuminating to those 
seeking information on newspaper work and with flawless 
dic:ion and deep insight into human nature, the well known 
dramatic critic explained many relative requirements for a 
successful newspaper career. 

Mrs. Bristol was accorded an ovation at the conclusion 
of her splendid address reflecting the strength of character 
as well as scintillating mind which are component parts of 
her own brilliant work. 

* * * 

La Gaiete Cotillion 

Mrs. Rosetta Baker announces that her January cotillion 
will be held on Friday. January 14, instead of Saturday 
evening, as has been the custom. Change of the date has 
been necessitated by the number of social engagements 
during the present month and patronesses urging Mrs. 
Baker to continue, without a break, the lovely parties over 
which she presides, aided her in selecting Friday night, 
January 14, as the best possible night for the cotillion. 

Invitational strictness characterizes Mrs. Baker's parties 
and everyone who attends knows the rule ; consequently, 
there is a friendliness and hospitality prevading the lovely 
affairs for which the hostess is responsible. 

* * * 

The Doctor Service Bureau 

"Franklin 88!" 

Just a phone number, but pregnant with power to help 
you in trouble ; to bring skilled medical aid to your S. O. S. 
call at any hour of the day or night. 

Just a phone number, but back of it a corps of physicians, 
surgeons, specialists, dentists, to reach your side and succor 
you; to relieve your agony; to checkmate Death itself! 

Who has not known the awful moment, when searching 
dazedly through the directory, you at last find the name 
you want, only to be told your own special doctor is not in ; 
is called to some other case, or (possibly) is out of town 
on an emergency? 

You are confused; you do not know which way to turn : 
moments spell life or death. 

At such a time call "Franklin 88." 

The girl at the switchboard at the Doctor Service Bureau 
at 1065 Sutter street puts you in touch with a phvsician in 
your own neighborhood, who speeds to you in answer to 
your frantic call, and brings peace where chaos ruled ; sur- 
cease from pain. 

Call "Franklin 88 !" 



— Permission to issue securities of nearly $750,000 has 
been granted to a dozen California corporations with a 
capitalization of approximately $1,500,000 to finance expan- 
sion of operations and new construction work, according 
to a report of the state corporation department. 

Chief among the permits issued were to mining com- 
panies to finance the resumption of mining operations in 
several old California gold fields. 
* * * 

A 5.100-pound seaplane was recently shot from the deck 
of a battleship at San Pedro, California, bv a catapault in 
which a charge of powder equivalent to that used for an 
eight-pound shell was exploded. 




LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 



AT CALPET GAS STATION 



Post and Franklin Streets 



San Francisco, Calif. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates: 35c per day} 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors (or Service and Storage of Automobiles 



Graystone 130 Open Day ap4 Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Fbancisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bash St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 
Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing:, oiling. Greasing:, Wnshlng: and Polishing: 

Gasoline Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4200 



Metal Work Apper- 
taining: to Automo- 
biles — Dry- Acetylene 
Welding — II look - 
smithing:. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



"CUT THIS OUT" 



This Coupon entitles Mr.._ _ 

to FREE Inspection 



and Minor 
Adjustments of Hydraulic Four Wheel 
Brakes. 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 
4S7 Mutt Street Telephone Market 1188 Sin Kraielaci 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

National Automobile Club 

THE leading- resolution for the 
California motorist for 1927 should 
deal with safety. 

The acceptance of his individual re- 
sponsibility by the motorist will go 
farther toward the reduction of acci- 
dents in the congested areas as well as 
on the open road than any regulations 
that may be prescribed by the State 
Legislature or by City Council. 

I lave your car under control at cross- 
ings. Anticipate the possibility of haz- 
ards ahead and you will be contribut- 
ing to the safety movement which is 
sweeping the country. 

The biennial parade into the State 
Capital began last week for the spring 
sessions of the Legislature 

One of the most important of the 
measures t<> be presented will be a plan 
for the refinancing of the California 
highway system so that the splendid 
work which is now under way may be 
carried on. 

Other measures affecting the motoi 
ists of California will deal with rcgi- 
tration, examination for drivers' li- 
censes, and State Motor Police. 

Ren Blow. Field Secretary of the 
National Automobile Club, who has 
just returned from Topeka. where he 
attended the annual meeting of the 
Victory Highwaj Association, reports 
great interest in the middle-west in re- 
gard to things Californian. 

line of the greatest tourist influxes 
on record will come over the Victory 
Highway during the year l°-27. de- 
clared Blow. One of the outstanding 
acts of the Victory Highway body was 
to sanction an alternate route between 



Kansas City and Topeka to take care 
of the great increase in traffic in that 
district. 

January is the ideal month for a trip 
to the snowline. The motorist may fol- 
low the Auburn or Placerville routes, 
the Yosemite Highway or follow the 
Pacific Highway to where Shasta, sen- 
tinel mountain of the northern boun- 
dary, looks down on a snow-covered 
valley that reminds one of the winter 
landscapes of the east. 

One of the great charms of Califor- 
nia is the fact that within a few hours 
one may travel from the sunshine and 
flowers of the coast to the land of 
snow. 

Oakland is the first Northern Cali- 
fornia city to attempt the control of 
pedestrian traffic as well as vehicular. 

The plan was put into execution be- 
fore the start of the holiday season and 
was remarkably successful, according 
to reports received from the Police De- 
partment. 

Many of the accidents within the 
confines of the large cities are due to 
jay-walking and proper control for the 
foot traffic is necessary for the safety 
of all concerned. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Imperial 

Lillian Gish comes to the Imperial 
Theater in the cinema adaptation of 
Hawthorne's "Scarlet Letter" on Sat- 
urday, following the conclusion of 
"Michael Strogoff," which has really 
had a popular engagement at the Im- 
perial. 

Lillian Gish has the support of 
Henry 1'.. Walthall, Karl Dane of "The 
Big Parade" fame; Lars Hanson, Wil- 
liam H. Looker, Joyce Coad and other 
players of screen popularity. 

* * * 

Pantages 

"Summer Bachelors" will be screen- 
ed at Pantages Theater next week, be- 
ginning with Saturday afternoon per- 
formance fallowing the close of "Obey 
the Law." in which Bert Lytell was 
the star. 

The appearance of James J. Corbett, 
"i lentleman Jim," has packed the thea- 
ter, for the former heavyweight cham- 
pion of the world still holds the admi- 
ration of the public, who respect him 
for his clean standards of sport and for 
bis own inimitable personality. 

* * * 

Alhambra 

The beautiful, new Alhambra on 
Polk Street, near Green, will have 
"Sunny Side Up" for its screen offering 
today, Saturday. Ian. 8. with Vera 
Reynolds, Edith Clayton and Edmund 
Burns the stars. 

In addition to the feature picture, the 
Alhambra Theater always offers a se- 
(Continued on Page 22) 



Our aim this year 

To render a dependable 
service — To the greatest 
possible number of people 
— Through a liberal exten- 
sion policy, and always at 
the lowest cost consistent 
with the class of service 
rendered. 



PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"PACIFIC 5EBV1CI- 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



©wells 

^— ■" TJATIONAI CMS! 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.300,000 enpn were »erred at tae 

Panama-Facile International Bxpeattla 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 8, 1927 



"*5\s3& 



J9" 



10* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



•9Vj>' 



SU- 



«*.' 



t*- 




the 
nki 



OUAKI 



Solari Leads Double Life — Character 
On and Off the Links 

FRED SOLARI. the Prince of Epicureans from 
Land of Sicily, is the greatest character on the 1 
today. Solari gets most of his enjoyment in trying to win 
a dime from Dr. Richard Tomlinson, Colonel Mund and 
Ed Fisher, who make up his regular foursome at Lakeside 
each week-end. 

Solari has a language and style all his own that nobody 
but himself understands. Fred is wound up like a Swiss 
watch and his movements never run down until one or the 
other of his foursome gives him the sad news when they 
arrive at the clubhouse, where all the arguments are re- 
hashed. 

If ever you pause opposite Fred's locker-room after a 
game, you would think it was Gene Tunney trying to 
squeeze out another thousand bucks. But Fred has' lots of 
good faults; in fact, Solari is about the biggest-hearted 
man in the Olympic Club today. I will verify that state- 
ment by incidents that have occurred quite recently. 

Fred, as you all know, is of a very nervous temperament 
but his gang stick to him just the same, because they know 
that in his heart and soul he is thinking of the other fellow 
About a year ago Solari promised the members of his four- 
some that ever he were lucky enough to break 100 at °x>lf 
he would put on the feedbag for the gang. After the boys 
had nosed the good news around to his friends on the 
street exactly 102 showed up at the Elks' Club to the 
banquet. 

Bill Syrnon was toastmaster of the evening, and to prove 
that all of them who were sitting around the festive board 
were friends of Fred he was asked by Chairman Svmon to 
introduce himself while they were getting away with their 
crab salad, turkey and White Rock 



Fred did it in a masterful fashion. He also announced 
their names in a loud, clear voice and then gave a line on 
their past history. Some of them were good, others not so 
good. 

Solari didn't stop there, for a little later he entertained 
sixty Olympic caddie boys from Lakeside at his cafe in 
Maiden Lane. They were chaperoned by Charlie Sullivan, 
the caddy master. 

Sitting at the head table were ten of Fred's most intimate 
friends who got the kick of their lives watching the boys go 
through their paces, which included soup, salad, turkey, 
Christmas pudding, mince pie and coffee. Some of the kids 
cashed in before they were half through the menu, [oe 
Navi, the caddy champ, cut several divots out of the mince 
pie. Jim Dillon holed out in one for a turkey. Louis Navi 
entertained with some Yiddisher songs. After the boys had 
enjoyed Fred Solari's hospitality in an evening well spend 
Fred bade the caddies good night and a Merry Christmas, 
but before leaving they were all presented with a half dollar 
to pay their car fare home. That's the kind of a man Fred 
Solari is. We only wish we had more like Fred. 



Miss Jackson Natural Golfer 

Among last year's crop of feminine golfers who have, 
shown considerable promise out of the tens of thousands 
who have played over our Municipal courses, none has stood 
out so prominently as Miss Patsy Jackson, a player of but- 
three months' standing. 

Miss Patsy bought a ticket from Paul, the starter at 
Lincoln Park, in the latter part of October and walked onto 
the course as- if she had played for years. 

The fact really was Miss Patsy had never hit a ball off 
the first tee before, but fortunately for Miss Jackson she 
fell into good company as Cavalier Dr. Fred Carfagni and 
his brother. Dr. Arthur Carfagni, came marching through 
the gate and seeing that Miss Patsy was alone, asked her 
if she would care to join them in a game. Miss Jackson said 
she would be delighted. 

Perhaps there are hundreds of people who don't really 
know Dr. Fred Carfagni, but there are fiftv thousand that 
do in San Francisco. Cavalier Carfagni cut a big figure in 
the World War. He is one of our wealthv native sons 
whose whole aim in civilian life is making it pleasant f..r the 
other fellow. 

Since the Brothers Carfagni commenced to play several 
times a week with Miss Patsy, she has developed into one 
01 the greatest prospects among the feminine plavers out at 
the Municipal links. 

Possessing a natural swing and a thorough knowledge of 
the game, Dr. Carfagni says that all Miss Patsv lacks is a 
lttle experience; after which she will be up among the 
leading women golfers of our city. 

Anyone who qualifies from the Municipal links at Lincoln 
1 ark can be listed among the finest golfers in the State 

Mrs. Brent Potter, the present Northern California cham- 
pion golfer, and Mrs. Helen Sheedy, who held the citv 
championship for two years, not to speak of Sam L Con- 
Ian John J. McHugh, the two Ritchie brothers, Georee 
and James, and many another golfer owe their rise in 
golfing fame to the greatest golf nursery in the world. 
Here is hoping that Miss Patsv fackson will be listed 
among the city's future greats. 



January 8, 1927 



THE SAX FRANCISO i NEWS LETTER 



21 




Louis and Francis 

Conlan, Jr., 

Two Future Golf Stars of 

the Olympic Club. 



Conlan Boys Real Stars 

The two Conlan boys, Frances, Jr., and Louis, have de- 
veloped in'to two great youngsters since their father, Dr. 
Francis Conlan, the famous ear, eye and throat specialist, 
takes the boys on periodical visits to his palatial residence 
at Pebble Beach. 

Dr. Conlan thought he knew a lot about golf until his two 
boys took him out on the Pebble Beach course' and trimmed 
him for fair. 

■ Perhaps that's the secret of why the doctor prefers to play 
post of his golf at Del Monte instead of Lakeside. He 
hates to let his friends around the club see what a dub he 
(s, because when the doctor goes out with the medicos to 
play in their tournaments he picks out such players as Dr. 
James Eaves and thinks he can beat him, but we notice 



that Dr. Jim always 
really win a cup. 



illects, even when Dr. Conlan does 



Linder a Star 

! Perhaps Edgar Linder, a 17-year-old high school boy, 
who learned the rudiments of the game at Lincoln Park, 
but who is now a member of the Lake Merced Golf and 
Country Club, has shown more promise than most any 
(jther youngster 'round the bay. 

j Linder is rated as one of the best kids at Merced and was 
paired with Clare Griswold as lead-off man in this club's 
Biter-club matches; but just when Linden was developing 
into a real competitive golfer, Griswald unfortunately be- 
came ill and hasn't been on the links for several months. 
?o lost some wonderful experience from one of the best 
players in our midst. 

I We hope that Griswold will son lie back with us. not 
only for the hoy's sake, but for the good ni the same, as 
lie is a splendid golfer and a credit to the game. 

* * * 

; Just welcomed into our now famous Canada Dry llole- 
Sn-One Club are the following new members: Mr. W, H. 
■foreland, 2324 Fourth Ave., Sacramento. California: Cap- 
Bin M. S. Elliott, Quarters "1." Navy Yard, Mare Island. 
Calif.; Mr. ( ;. K. Nichols, 262 Castro St., Hayward, Cali- 
fornia ; Cant. R, A. Robinson, U, S, M. c. 100 Harrison St.. 
San Francisco, California. 

* * * 

polf at Coronado 

| Three major tournaments, the Hotel del Coronado Handi- 
cap Cup. Veterans Cup and the annual Coronado Country 
Club amateur championship, will feature the winter and 
Jpring golf schedule, according to Major Colin G. Ross. 
Secretary ><\ the club. An augmented list oi minor tourneys 
will also be scheduled so that each week will be enlivened 
by competitive events. 

' The C von.ido Country Club amateur championship will 
be the most important event of the winter schedule, Febru- 
ary J 4-1°. with the Veterans' Cup tournament March 1 to 5. 



The qualifying round of the championship will be 3o holes 
on February 14. Sixteen will qualify in the title flight, 
which will be played at scratch. There will be as many 
flights as there are 16s to play, all under handicap. The first 
round of match play is set for February 15; the second 
February 16, with the semi-finals and finals of all except 
championship flight February 17. The title flight semi- 
finals will be played on this date over 36 holes and the 
finals of 36 holes February 18. 



The New Coffee Tavern 

The smart eating place of the Civic Center District, the new 
Hotel Whitcomb Coffee Tavern, opened for business on 
Wednesday morning, December 29th. The total cost of the de- 
velopment of the Tavern is $110,000 and its opening another 
realization of achievement under the direction of D. M. Lin- 
nard, lessee of the property and of Ernest Drury, manager. 

The Tavern has transplanted a bit of old England to the 
city of San Francisco. In design and decoration and in all 
detail practical, with up to date service, the Tavern is a replica 
of the famous Coffee Houses of the Seventeenth century, even 
to the beamed ceiling, the tiled floor and the open fireplace. 

Entrance to the Coffee Tavern is just beyond the main en- 
trance to the hotel on Market Street and also from the hotel 
lobby. Widening of the former marquee over the main en- 
trance to shelter the door of the Tavern, also adds considerable 
distinction to the appearance of the hotel. 

As the entire front of the Tavern faces along Market Street, 
especial attention has been given to the windows. A particu- 
larly beautiful effect has been obtained by the use of English 
art glass, in tones which give a subdued golden light, and which 
are slightly opaque, giving just the right touch of privacy to 
the diners within. The decorations of the windows are typical 
figures from English history and tradition. The windows are 
imported and were made specially to order for the Whitcomb 
Tavern. 

The seating capacity of the room is two hundred and thirty 
persons, beside the counter, which runs the entire length of the 
n n 'in and which includes a complete soda fountain equipment. 

Heat and ventilation are automatically controlled from the 
roof by fans supplying a draft of fresh air. which is passed 
over heatig pipes to insure the proper temperature. 



Drunk (stopping street car) — Say — thish car go to For 
tieth Street? 
Conductor — Yes. 
"Well, g'bye an' God blesh you." — Stanford Chaparral. 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Roomi, Clean Linen, Clean ETerrlhbif 

Rale* Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



C^ALilEilN It V 1LL.A CARL STEFFEN . PROP 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minute* Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



21 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lanuary 8, V>27 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 19) 
ries of entertaining; films, including 
news reels, the latest information on 
world events and a program of music 
than which there is none better in the 
city. 

Rudolph's Melody Masters play 
many classical airs of popular choice 
and have special selections played by 
skilled musicians as part of their splen- 
did musical programs. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 




PIONEER 



The 
Name 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San. Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES I 

San Francisco— Bnrllniganie 

West 793 478 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER -GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

528 California St. (and Branches), 
San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st, 
1926, a dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four and one-quarter (4Vi) per cent pel- 
annum on all deposits, payable on and after 
January 3rd. 1927. Dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and earn in- 
terest from January 1st, 1927. Deposits made 
on or before January 10th. 1927, will earn in- 
terest from January 1st. 1927. 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Secretary. 



Humboldt Bank 

Market St., Near 4th; Bush and Montgom- 
ery Branch, Mills Building. 



For the half-year ending December 31, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on savings de- 
posits, payable on and after January 3d, 1 V+ - 7 . 
Dividends not called for bear interest from 
January 1, 1927. Money deposited on or be- 
fore January 10, 1927, will earn interest from 
January 1, lfl-7. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, 
Vice-President and Cashier. 



Bank of Italy 

Head Office and San Francisco Branches 



For the half-year ending December 31, 1926. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 4 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after January 3, 1927. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and bear 
the same rate of interest as the principal 
from January 1, 1927. Savings deposits made 
on the first business day of any month (or on 
or before the 10th day of January, April, July 
and October) will earn interest from the first 
of that month; deposits made after said date 
will earn interest from the first of the fol- 
lowing month. SAVINGS DEPOSITS MADE 
TO AND INCLUDING JANUARY 10 WILD 
EARN INTEREST FROM JANUARY 1. 

JAMES A. BACIGALUPI, President. 



Italian-American Bank 

SE. cor. Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. ; 
North Beach Branch, corner Columbus Ave. 
and Broadway; Columbus Branch, corner 
Montgomery and Washington Sts. 



For the half-year ending December 31, 1926, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four per cent per annum on all saving de- 
posits, payable on and after January 3, 1927. 
Dividends not called for will be added to the 
principal and bear Interest from January 1, 
1927. Deposits made on or before January 10, 
1927, will earn interest from January 1. 
1927. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 



The French- American Bank 

i Saving's Department) 
108 Sutter St.. and Branches 



For the half-year ending December 31, 1920, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter (AMt) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payable on and after 
Monday, January 3, 1927. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from January 1, 
1927. Deposits made on or before January 10, 
1927, will earn interest from January 1, 1927. 
LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 



Phone Sunn 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

{Formerly teith Shreve A Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Po*t Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

CmU mtul Deliver in San FroneUco, A lamed* mmui 

Son Mateo Counties 




N, W. CORNER 
GRAYSTONE 240 POLK AND POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 
Individual Attention Given to 
Each Order 
Office and Works 1625 Minloo St. 

Phone Market 7913 

Branch Offlcei 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 

Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

If here Good Tailoring 
Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal. 
Sport and Business wear is now 
ready for your early considera- 
tion. 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
opp. olympic club 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phoae Garaeld S852 KM Market >«. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
tiliARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^, 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The Cily's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, T.ic, SI.00 35c, 50c, 7Sc $1.00,$1.S0 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 o. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 
HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

Hattie Mooser Minnie C. Mooseh 



manors 



m 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty ^nd the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 



T 






Caroline Jones 
Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 


M 


f*t(ln\ 




and tea from 3 to 5 
Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 


*$ 




334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch II a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'F.rrell and 
Lirkto St.. 



Weckdaya, Luncheon 



BLANCO'S 



Phon* 
Cray.lone 8100 



(11:30 to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, W««k Day. and Snndayi I. SO 



No Vititsf Should Ifjip (he City With- 
out Pi nine in the Fincit Cafe 
in America 



Our Mam Oinini Room is open again on Sundays. 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

l>3 Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:10 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 3:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 



I— 




* ' '■■■ ■ . . a. i 


1 


•J ""££&_. 


Uncle lorn s Labm 
Restaurant 

ortN »M A. M. TO IliOO P. ¥. 




14. Mm Hoi.a 


Caul Leonhardt 

Feemtrty of Golden Gat. Park Ca.in* 
-___— — .4 



J*——.. .—....*... ........ —..._...._________,.___ 



John P. Duffy 

FISHER & CO. 

Exclusive Hatters 

Since 18S1 
Christmas Merchandise Orders 



650 Market Street 
Opp. Palace Hotel 



San Francisco, Calif. 
Kearny 2465 




ICE CREAMS 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



Grayilona 
1100 3101 11U2 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 

DINNER 



w 



LA CASA BIGIN 

STOCKTON STREET (By the Tun 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE. 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day Is 
taking very good care of them, Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth soref Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield S35 

SPECIALISTS — Exlrnollons; Crowns: Self Cleaning Bridges: 

Porcelain Work and Roofless Platen 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12. 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



Unlike New Year's Resolutions, the Quality 
of La Grande Service never wanes. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recomnwnded Laandry* 1 
250 Twelfth Sr„SAH Francisco Thohi M\hket916 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Sprints" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Street ■ -Garfield 844 



!S/*IL TO NEW YORK j 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and j 
GAY HAVANA, en route 
















4 


i 


Sister Ships: 




\\ ■ * * 




SS VENEZUELA 


J 


Jkt 




SS COLOMBIA 




SS ECUADOR 







Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropia 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
leven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and historic ports — Man- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose dc Cuatemala; La Liberlad, Salvador; Corlnto, 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra fo' 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swimming tank. The Panama Mail i> 
world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Co East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as $350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Next 
sailings from San Francisco: SS ECUADOR, January 22; SS COLOMRI<\. F.-liruar> 
19. From Los Angeles two days later. Westward from New York: SS COLOMBIA. 
January 15; SS VENEZUELA, February 5. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



DISTINCTION! 






Perfect- COMFORT! 



With 



RCONOMY! 



These three features com- 
bined with many other attrac- 

tion s . including excvllen t meals, 
form a combination of hotel 
service difficult to equal. 

Make your next 
stay at the 
famous 



548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




RATES 
Per Day 
single 
European Plan 

120 rooms with running 
water $2.50 to $4-00 
220 rooms with bath 

3.S0 to 5.00 
160 rooms with bath 

6.00 to 8.00 
Double. 4.00 up 



of lBrjte and beautiful roomi ,.,ul 
period furnishings with grand pi- 
mJ bath, $10 up. 



RAMCHO GOLP CLUtj 

available to all eucsts 

PUaie write 
for booklet 

HAROLD E. LATH R OP 

Manager 




ROLLS-ROYCE 



Direct Branches 

San Francisco 
461 Post St. 



Los Angeles 
3136 Wilshire Blvd. 




"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point A — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif 



CUMfLfc. 1 H KAU1U I'KUGK AMS, FOR NEXT WEEK, IN THIS ISSUE 




#5.00 PER YEAR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Saturday January 15, 1927 



PRICE 10 CENTS 
LOS ANGELES 











\ 

\ » 








w 38% *P > 1 




Rodney is the elder sun of 






'the theatrical magnate, Alex- 






ander Vantages, and is said 






to be mure than './ chip «/ 






the old block." Rodney is al- 






ways striving to improve his 






father's theatres with ideas 




X. I 


oj his own and all the amuse- 




V;4 


ment world is watching the 
progress of this dynamic. 




ni m 


young theatre manager. 




m 


"^ - • »A- ! 1 




|H Ha^^. >jk 


* 






Rodney A. P w r v 




General Manager for tk< Circuit of Theatt 




Local Manager, With Headquarter) in This City. 














/he model "Ninety" Locomobile expresses 
the highest standard of modern coachwork 
plus the mechanical supremacy which has 
made Locomobile preeminent for a quarter 
century. Both in appearance and performance 
on the road, Locomobile model "Ninety" is a 
superb motor car, typifying all that is finest 
and best in the art of fine 
car building. 

J^oeomobile 

THE BEST BUILT CAR IN AMERICA 



Locomobile Model 90 

$5500 to $7500 

With Custom Built Bodies 

/. 0. b. Bridgeport 



Locomobile Junior Eight Model 48, Series 10 

$1785 tO $2.2.85 $7400 tO $I2.,000 

Five Body Types With Custom Built Bodies 

/. 0. b. Bridgeport /. 0. b. Bridgeport 



Locomobile Company of California - - - 250 Fulton Street, San Francisco 




Established July 20, 1856 



SAN "JSggpfcCo 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast _ 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

Jr., from 1S84 to 1825. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

Telephone Kearny 8357. Entered at ,San Francisco, California, Postofflce as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5,00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, IANUARY 15, 1927 



X... 



Bridging The Bay 



By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



PROGRESS invariably, in all its phases, has to compete 
with the sentiment of idealists; beauty lovers must suf- 
fer from the demands of commerce; this condition will en- 
dure just so long as progress builds in a strictly utilitarian 
manner, and idealism makes no concession to practicability. 

There is no reason, of course, why the two should not 
Send in a harmonious whole — utility ami loveliness — but 
that would be a state of Utopia, and we are dealing primarily 
with the year 1927. 

No doubt in the early eighties, there were those who de- 
plored the building of the Brooklyn Bridge as a detriment to 
the scenic values of the Fast River; or earlier still, the same 
genus of people found fault with the- erecting of the London 
bridge; or still farther back in history, the Bridge of Sighs 
in beautiful Venice was the occasion for opposition; the op 
posers never taking into consideration the reality that when 
cities or tow ns are almost entirely surrounded by water, and 
these communities in the course of human events, are forced 
In expand, there is only one solution, a Bridge. 

Ten years ago the population of San Francisco numb 
$6,912 (and when we sa) San Francisco we mini San 
I'lamisco pure and simple; not including South San Fran- 
cisco nor Dal) Cit\ nor any of the numerous hamlets down 
iln Peninsular line). Today, by the statistics of the Chamber 
of Commerce, our city holds 706,391 men. women and chil- 
dren; in other words, our population has almost doubled it- 
sell msidi . il ten \ ears ! 

When we realize the comparative!) narrow strip of land 
upon which we have budded our cit) between the ocean and 
the bay, and mentalh picture the traffic attendant upon a 
metropolis of this si/e. visions of bridges, bridges. 1> 
seem to us to be the onl) wav of c\it or entrance. 

The bridging of San Francisco 1 ' . i \ is. in fact, such an 
important question that it is facetiously remarked at the 
Cit) I bill: "There are eighteen different bridges in contem- 
plation, one for each Supervisor!" 

The bridges to span our hav which are most seriousl) in 
contemplation are the Golden Gati . the Telegraph 

Hill Bridge to Coat Island; the Mission Rock Bridge to 
Alameda: the bnh Street Bridge to Maine. la : the Hunter's 
Point Bridge to Mameda and the Coyote Creek Bridgi 
Mateo | to I layward. 

The Antioch Bridge has been in operation fo over a year 
between the towns of Antioch and Rio Vista and relieves 
the traffic which heretofore was ferried ovei the river. 

It will also be the connecting link with the great Victory 
Highway, traveling across the Continent, and 'is harmon- 
ious lines ai, an ornament to the section untry 
which it graces. 



The Carquinez Straits Bridge will be completed on May 
21st; a much needed outlet for traffic up Napa and Sonoma 
Valleys, to the Lake County region. 

On January 15th (today) the Dumbarton Highway 
Bridge across the lower arm of San Francisco Bay is sched- 
uled to open for traffic. 

This toll bridge, constituting the first answer to the de- 
maud for highway communication across San Francisco 
Bay, provides a new outlet from San Francisco and the 
peninsula to the eastbay region and San Joaquin Valley 
highways. The principal interest of the motorist in the 
bridge, from the point of view of touring in the bay region, 
i- that it provides a more direct connection between the 
highways which skirt both sides of the bay. 

Commercially, the bridge will be of advantage to San 
Francisco and the upper part of the San Joaquin Valley by 
providing a shorter all-highwaj route between San Fran- 
cisco ami Livermore and Tracy. 

With the completion of the Bay Shore Highway down the 
peninsula and the construction of a connecting link from 
this highwaj to the bridge, paralleling the Southern Pacific 
oad at this point, these benefits will be even more pro- 
nounced. For the benefit of motorists seeking information 
on new routes available when the bridge is opened, the 
Automobile Association has compiled the following data: 
\t present the western terminus of the bridge will be 
connected with the highway down the peninsula by roads 
from Menlo Park and from 'Palo Alto. There is a road from 
the eastern terminus of the bridge to Newark. Alameda 
t oiintv. and paved highway thence to ("entcrville ami Niles 

The bridge route distance between Menlo Park and Cen- 
ter die or N'iles will be fifteen and a half miles shorter than 
the present highway route via Mountain View, Alviso and 
Milpitas. Points oil the Peninsula Highway from Menlo 
Park north will be more than seven miles closer to Liver- 
n the \ allev I lighway. 

The distance from Livermore to Menlo Park via N'iles 
Canyon and the bridge will be a little less than 38 miles as 
compared to a little over 45 miles via Sunol, Mission San 
lose and the Mountain View-Alviso cutoff. 

The bridge toll rates are fixed in the franchise granted 
by the Board of Supervisors of San Mateo County and are 
based on a charge of five cents per person and thirty cents 
for a five-passenger car or a truck of one-ton capacity. 

In the next twenty years or s,, the aviator may peer down 

great metropolis, lying on a comparatively narrow 

I ninsula. but spreading out into innumerable square miles 

other shores, through the medium of do 

ridges, the whole appearing like a monstrous spider web. 

s nucleus— San Francisco! 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



(anuary 15, 1921 




says: "The government's failure to control the diversion of 
industrial alcohol does not give the right to poison the pro- 
duct." That is a sensible statement, such as one mighT 
reasonably expect from an officer and a gentleman. 



( If course, we have no winter in California. 
Spring is Here The hills grow brown in the summer; then 
come the fall rains; the grass begins to 
spring again and we have spring coming back. True 
enough, its steps are rather slow and weak at first. But, on 
the other hand, summer never really went, for the rose- 
continue to bloom in the garden and the camelias come out, 
shamelessly and openly, in December. 

All the same, while the sun sinks, there is still a wintry 
feel in the early morning and at nightfall. White frost- 
come and there 'is just a hint of what might be happening. 
were we less fortunately placed. So, in spite of roses and 
camelias, we do not find it hard to persuade ourselves, be- 
tween Thanksgiving and Christinas, that we are really hav- 
ing a touch of winter. 

But when once the fateful December 21st has passed and 
the sun begins to travel towards us again, we note how 
Nature responds and spring really and actually gets under 
way. Already, daffodils are glowing in the streets and the 
dainty acacia" is waving its yellow banners in the wind at 
the street flower-stall. Seek the world over and there is 
nothing more lovely than the advent of these first spring 
flowers to our city. The joy and comfort of them are almost 
inestimable. 

The procession of flowers has therefore begun. From 
now on they will be coming, inarching into town in ever 
increasing quantity and variety. Florists' shops and street 
stalls will glow and shine with the glory of them. Their 
sweetness and beauty will penetrate the consciousness ol 
those who, apparently not heeding, hurry through the busy 
streets. 

We are blessed in many things but in few things more 
than in our early spring. 



Secretary of the Treasury Mellon 
Explanations in Order is to explain to Congress just how it 

happened that the United States 
government engaged in the practice of killing its citizens 
who took the risk of disobeying the Volstead Act. Explan- 
ations are necessary, for it is doubtful if, in modern times, 
any such abuse of governmental power has occurred. It 
is said that the government will show the extent to which 
it has been subjected to the dictatorial demands of the Anti- 
Saloon League. 

This innocent sounding title has covered a multitude of 
iniquities. The Anti-Saloon League, which has no govern- 
mental responsibility, has taken upon itself to push the 
governmental officers to extremes of illegality and to un- 
constitutional acts, which, in a less well behaved and less 
law abiding community than our own. would have resulted 
in violent demonstrations. It is a testimonial to the steady- 
good sense and long endurance of the American people that 
it has withstood the aggressions and the corruption of a 
body of irresponsible people which has played upon the 
fears and cowardice of the popular representatives so long-. 
But there is an end to patience. There must come a time 
when the decent people of this country will refuse to be 
herded, even killed, at the behest of any body of self-consti- 
tuted moral dictators, no matter what their pretensions. 

It is very good to see that Major Walton A. Green, who 
was until recently chief prohibition investigator under Gen- 
eral Andrews, has come out with a scathing denunciation of 
the poisoning method of enforcing an unpopular law. He 



The political mill is grinding again. 
The Legislature Meets This is the time when the legisla- 
tors, who are meeting in Sacramen- 
to, make a show of earning their pay, which is little enough, 
in all consequence. Incidentally, they lay upon us burden- 
grievous to be borne and pile up taxation in a way which 
makes us grateful that there is a legislature sitting only 
once in two years. And yet, the amount of mischief that 
can be done in a feu weeks by a body of popular representa- 
tives is nothing short of astounding. 

We are not at all sure about the present state of affair- at 
Sacramento, Governor Young is a well trained and able 
executive; yet he has leanings which, if pushed too far. may 
easily embarrass the forward movement of the State. We 
cannot afford any fancy legislation at the present time. To 
let sleeping dogs lie would be about as good a motto as any 
which this legislature could adopt. 

< )f course, in the old days, it used to be said that it was 
merely the duty of the government to keep the ring and 
to let ability and thrift compete within the limits of peace 
and honesty. It is true that, under just such rules, this 
country grew and flourished and our Flag gained the respect 
of the world. But times have changed, and governments 
fancy that they have other things to do than to keep the 
peace. As a result, there is a lamentable development of 
criminality and the courts, as well as the community, are 
troubled to deal with the violent assaults of the criminal 
classes. 

That is a matter which the legislature may well take up and 
handle with firmness and without sentimentality. As long 
as crime flourishes, we miss the most important factor in 
government, for until the peace is kept and honesty can go 
unmolested we cannot be said to have a government. 



« 



A few weeks ago the daily papers 
Sensationalism Again were full 'if the Mexican trouble. 
which threatened. ..n account of the 
intention of President Calles. to enforce the constitutional 
provisions with respect to landholding by foreigners. The 
critical time has passed and there has been no trouble, so 
far. In fact, the corporations, which were expected to be 
the chief opponents of the policy of the Mexican President, 
have quite unexpectedly fallen into line. 

This may appear strange, unless the actual conditions of 
the Mexican situation are taken into account. Our State 
Department took the position that the laws which Calles 
was about to enforce were confiscatory ami amounted to the 
violation of treaty rights under which American citizens 
had taken up land and made investments in Mexico. The- 
oretically, the State Department is quite right. To limit 
the time within which ownership of property, acquired in 
good faith, must expire, is. to say the least, an arbitrary 119 
of power, which could not be endured by any self-respecting 
nation, where such limitation of property rights is employe! 
against its nationals. 

It is well known that no country has been more careful 
than has Great Britain to preserve the lives, liberties and 
property of its nationals in other land-. Vet. the British 
proprietors were among the first to acquiesce in the demands 
of the Mexican government and to comply with the regis- 
tration requirements which Mexican law demands. 

The reason has become obvious by this time. Is it that, 
as far as oil properties are concerned, it is pretty generally 
recognized that they will have been thoroughly exploited 
long before the fifty years of ownership allowed by the 
Mexican law have expired. 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The dead emperor of Japan lies in state, 
Japanese Maxims in the imperial palace and his successor 
Hirohito has issued the message to the 
nation which acquaints them with the death of the former 
ruler, and the succession of himself, who, even now, oc- 
cupies an almost divine position in the eyes of the Japan- 
ese people. 

We are accustomed to speak with admiration of the pro- 
gress made by the Japanese in an incredibly short time. 
We are obliged to note that this Asiatic island empire now 
ranks among the great powers of the world and that Jap- 
anese statesmen, Japanese doctors, Japanese practical sci- 
entists, and lapanese colonizers are among the best to be 
found anywhere. Observing these facts, we are inclined 
to rush to the conclusion that therefore the Japanese are a 
modern people and that the occidentalism, which they have 
imitated so well, is also in possession of their hearts and 
minds as it is of our own. 

But a study of the document of Hirohito will show that 
no occidental monarch could ever have addressed his people 
is does this young ruler, who, according to all accounts, 
is a model of industry and propriety, in his own person. 
He takes the liberty of telling his people what they should 
desire. Can it be imagined that any occidental ruler, roy- 
;ilist or republican, would even dare to do such a thing? 
He says that the people should heed certain principles, 
Bnong which be ranks first simplicity, instead oi vain dis- 
play. Much as we should like to go through the list, which 
is fascinatingly moral, we stop here to point out that the 
Japanese monarch has not grasped even the fundamentals 
if occidental economic life. Simplicity, as known even to 
Be Victorians, would utterly ruin our entire economic sa- 
ltern and would turn thousands of men and women jobless 
m the streets. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



L. I-'.. Ross, chief of the State Bureau 
Weddings and Births of Vital Statistic, has made In- an- 
nual report on marriage-, in Califor- 
lta. Summing it up, it would appear that it has been a 
Ecord year; thai is to say, there has been a marked ini 
n the number of marriages. 

There was a slump, towards the end of the year, but tak- 
ng the twelve months, there were oo.UO marriages, a gain 
.1 ilo .ut 10,000 ovei the preceding period. The wedding 
lees are estimated at $330,000. 

Relatively, as well as actually, the marriage rate ha-- m 
■eased, being 16 per thousand residents, against 14 per 
bonsand in the preceding year, and this in itself, proves 
that prosperity has been marked during the past year. For 
lotlnng is more indicative of material well-being than the 
ncrease in the number of marriages which comes inevit- 
ibly as part of the Upward trend of trade and industry. 

But, though marriages may increase, that does not help, 

i there is not also an increase in the number of children. 
IL'p to within very recent times, marriage and children were 
slewed as mutually involved phenomena. Not today. how- 
Mi. \\ e learn that among the newer and younger set con- 
dolence, rather than congratulation, is in order on the ar- 
ival of oils), ring. 

Whether that is true or not, Some such feeling must be 
•xistent, for the birth rate has actually dramatically ^\r 
'lined. In fact, last year saw the greatest decrease in the 
number of births since state red started. 1 he 

births were 82.500 last year. 85,492 in 1925 and So.S'»> in 
1924. The birth rate for the current year is 20 per thousand. 

Birth controllers will be pleased, but we cannot honestly 
with them. People who cannot afford children are 
eallv | 



All Explained 

Hubby — "Well, goodby, my dear; if I'm prevented from 
coming home this evening, I'll send you a note." 

Wifie — "There's no need. I have already taken it out of 
your letter-case." — Meggendorfer Blaetter (Munich). 

Naught From Seven 

Teacher — "Robert, here is an example in subtraction. 
Seven boys went down to the creek to bathe, but two of 
them had been told not to go in the water. Now, can you 
inform me how. many went in?" 

Robert — "Yes'm ; seven." — Lancashire Daily Post. 

* * * 

The Strenuous Sex. 

Coach (to new player) — "You're great! The way you 
hammer the line, dodge, tackle your man and worm through 
your opponents is simply marvelous." 

New Player (modestly) — "I guess it all comes from my 
early training, sir. You see, my mother used to take me 
shopping with her on bargain days." — Boston Transcript. 

* * * 

Belle of the Ball 
Basil — "Do you know who that sweet 
I've been dancing with all the evening?" 

that's mother!" 



( iwendi ilen- 

( London ). 



'( )h, yes, 



little girl is that 
— The Humorist 



Why Flowers Blush 

The flowers used in the desecration of the church today 
arc given by Mrs. |. W. — Philadelphia Church Calendar. 

* * * 

No Groping Under the Bureau 
"I've swallowed my collar-button." gasped the grocer. 
'Well." responded his wife, "you know where it is, any- 
way."- The Progressive Grocer. 

* * * 

Getting Even 

|udge — "Haven't I seen you before somewhere?" 
' endant- "Surely: I taught you daughter singing les- 
sons." 

fudge — "Fifty years."— Washington Cougar's Paw. 

* * * 

Cutting Out the Worry 

"\\ hat's the result of the examination, doc'" 
"You're all run down- my advice is that you lay off golf 
for a while an, I get a good long rest at the office." — Life. 

* * * 

Tender Morsel 

"My poor man." said the prison visitor, "do let me send 
you some cake. What kind would you prefer;" 

"Any kind, ma'am." said the convict, "so long a- it 

a tile in it." — Good Hardware. 

* * * 

Fellow Feeling 

Dean — "Do you know who I am''" 

. "No sir, but if you can remember your address 

I'll take you home." — Brown lug 

* * * 

Try a Gas-Mask 
Nightie- -"The secret of good health is onion eating." 
—"But how can onion eating be kept a 
ell Wiilovv. 

* * * 

Now, Girls 
Vast supply of fresh sea fools. Come early and get your 
Michigan Paper. 




THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



>LE/ISURE'SW4ND 



January 15, 1927 



OBEY NO u/AND BUT PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Moore- 



Dramatic Presentations 
Comedy Plays — Operetta 

SEVERAL changes in theatrical of- 
ferings have been placed before the 
San Francisco public this past week, 
and with the close of the marvelous 
pantomime, "The Miracle," hundreds 
of visitors from various parts of the 
State have remained in the city for the 
privilege of seeing other stage produc- 
tions. 

The result has been one of pleasure 
and profit to all concerned. 

For the theaters of San Francisco 
have had so many good things — far too 
good to miss ; and those who live in 
adjacent cities have found it to their 
advantage to go to "all the shows." 

Thus, this western metropolis is 
most assuredly avowed the theater city 
of the coast. More -and more are great 
producers, realizing that "the best" is 
none too good for us, even though it 
means a long trans-continental trip to 
satisfy our craving for the superior 
productions, the big shows, and the 
very highest top-notchers in the way 
of theatrical attractions. 

* * * 
Columbia 

San Francisco is keenly interested in 
the coming engagement of Mikhail 
Mordkin and his Ballet Russe at the 
Columbia Theater, where the)' have an 
engagement beginning Monday eve- 
ning, January 17. under the manage- 
ment of Selby C. Oppenheimer. 

"Carnival," including a large ballet, 
will be on the opening bill, with music 
by Glazounov, Tschaikowsky's "Phoe- 
nix"; "The Italian Beggar Dance", 
the "Bacchanale" of Saint Saens and 
other artistic divertissements. 

This same program will be repeated 
at the Wednesday matinee. 

On Tuesday, Thursday and Satur- 
day nights, "Aziade" will be the prin- 
cipal ballet. Mordkin appearing in his 
famous "Bow and Arrow" dance. "The 
Snow Maiden," "The Sea Gull;" "Bac- 
chanale" and divertissements. 

Rubinstein's "Souvenir of Roses" 
will be given Wednesday night and at 
the Saturday matinee. Tschaikow- 
sky's, "Nightingale." a Liszt "Hun- 
garian Rhapsody" and a series of Egyp- 
tian dances are scheduled for these per- 



By Josephine Young 

formances. 

Mordkin is supported by a cast ol 
artists and a company of 75. \ era 
Nemtchinova. Hilda Butsova, Pierre 
Vladmiroff, are principals. 

Miss Virginia Marvin, the San Fran- 
cisco girl, who conducted large danc- 
ing classes both here and in < )akland, 
will be seen with the Mordkin danc- 
ers. The talented and dainty Miss Mar- 
vin had one or two solos <>n programs 
featured throughout the country and 
her many admirers in the Bay Cities 
eagerly await an opportunity of seeing 
the lovely girl when she appears at the 
Columbia with the great Mordkin and 
his distinguished company of Russian 
dancers. 

* * * 
President 

San Francisco, apparently has fol- 
lowed New Yolk in registering its en- 
thusiastic approval of "The Little Spit- 
fire," the joyous comedy by Myron C. 
Fagin. now running on Broadway, and 
which, on Sunday, at the matinee per- 
formance, begins its fifth week at the 
Henry Duffy theater. The President, 
on McAllister street. 

Here is really a play with a cast se- 
lected by Mr. Duffy from the best tal- 
ent available on the Pacific Coast. 

Dale Winter takes the rule of "The 
Spitfire" and it would lie difficult to 
find a more convincing spitfire than 
Miss Winter, who, as the "gypsy," a 
former chorus girl, gives just the right 
display of temper and the last of tongue 
in presenting the character part. 

Earle Lee and < Hive Cooper have two 
very important roles and the selection 
seems exactly right, for they bring the 
laughs with their rapid fire repartee. 
Alice Buchanan i> the vamp in the play. 
John O'Hara takes the part of the in- 
dulgent father making move sparkle for 
the tempo of the production. 

IP TOWN 

Kiuloliih Melody Max- 
trrs. Musical Proprrums 
•'The Boy Friend," Sat. 

. "Early to Wed," Sun. 
"The Campus Flirt," 
Mon.. Tiles.. Wed. "l'p 
StnKe," Thursday and 

Friday. 



ALII VMHRA 

(New) 

Polk and Green 



SPECIAL 



"The Miracle" — Last two performances, 
Saturday Matinee. 2 p. in., and Sntnrday 
N'Mrhf. s n. ni., Civic Auditorium, today. Janu- 
ary 1T». Lady- Diana Manners, "Madonna," Sat. 
Matinee. Iris Tree. Nun. Elizabeth Schlrmer, 
"Madonna," Sat. FveniiiK. Lady Diana Man- 
ners, \un. Final Performance .Saturdnv 
\iKht — Positively. 




Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR 
o'Farrell nr. Powell 



}"The Home Towners." 
Geo. Cohan's Cnmedy- 
Farcc. 



CAPITOL 

Ellis or. Market 



"The Prince of Ha- 
waii," Opening Sunday. 
Natives of Hawaii In 
L Songra and Dances. 



COLUMBIA 
70 Eddy Street 



Mordkin Mallei llusse. 
One Week. llefr. Mon- 
day \lfrht, January 17. 
Company of 7.%. Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 



CCRRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 



-. "The Riddle Woman," 

I, Begr. Monday Nitrht. 

J Bertha Kalleli, Distia- 

Kllishctl Truaeiliciuie. 



PRESIDENT 1 "The Little Spi.llre." 

McAllister ar. Mkt. J Henry Dully Comedy. 



WILKES 
Geary at Mason 



"The Cradle Sunteli- 
crs." Helen Moll. hi, 
Russell Mcndcruft. 



VAUDEVILLE 



GOLDEN GATE 
G. G. Ave. it Taylor 



Rue Samuels, Famous 

soaK star. Headlines 

~] Odivn and Her Seals In 
I Wafer Feats. "Cirpn- 
r rnl Kate, Screen Pea 
J tare. Vera Reynolds. 
Claude Sweeten, Lead- 
er of Orchestra. 



.Maud Allan, Famous 

Da n ce r. II i-ii il I I iicr. 

1 Jack Norworth. Doro- 

OKPHEUM ( thy Adelphl. Joe Dnr- 

O'Farrell & Powell f '••">• "Blackfi " Soiik- 

J slcr." Anna llrullc and 
Andre Pnllo, Dancers, 

PANTAGES(NEW) 1 Second Annual "In- 
«,,,..„, ? door Circus." Oilier 

Market at Hyde J B|g , A( ., H> 



IMON square: 

O'Farrell nr. Po 



;E 1 
'well J 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



WIGWAM 

• li-.si.in and -HimI 



Vaudeville-Picture* 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 



CALIFORNIA 

Market at 4th 



CAMEO 
Market opp. 5th 



"Bertha, the Scwlaff 
Machine Girl." Madge 
Bellamy, Star. Music 
by the Sherwo od*. 

River." Sat. 

/.line Gre>* 

II. .11 and 



"Forlorn 
to Wed 

Story. .lut-k . , 
B a y to o a .1 II a t 1 i 
Stars. "The Cam pal 
Flirt." Wed. to Sat. 
Behc I >:imi.'K, Star. 



GRANADA 

Market at Jonei St. 



"I t." Elinor ti I j n "i 

Play. Clara Bow. Star. 

1 Elinor Glyn Aiipnir- 

r Inn in IVrsini Sat. unci 

J Sun. Eddie IVnbody, 

Orchestra LeadC r. 

Stage Presentation*. 



IMPERIAL. 

Market bet. flth-7th 



"The Scarlet Letter.' 
Lillian Gl*h. 



ST. ERAXCIS 
Market bet. Mli-liih 



"The Kid Brother," 

Harold Lloyd, Heisr. Sat. 

World Premiere. 



AVAR FIELD 

Market nr. Taylor 



"The Lunatic at 
Larue." Leon Krrnl 
Star. Stai^e Attrac- 
tions: "Our 0« n tslrl*' 
Juvenile star* 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



King Calder, Joseph De Stefani and 
Florence Roberts arc indispensable in 
their characterizations contributing to 
the play's success. Thomas Kelly, John 
Mackenzie and John Sandoval are in 
the cast. * * * 

Curran 

Mine, Bertha Kalich captivated San 
Francisco audiences on the very first 
night of her appearance here in the 
Curran Theater, where the noted trage- 
dienne scored high success in the role 
of "Magda," the Herman Sudermann 
drama, revised by Charles Edward 
Amory Winslow. 

She was called before the curtain six 
or seven times right after the second 
act, when she thrilled the Curran the- 
ater patrons with her histrionic art. 
flowers, after the good-old-time cus- 
tom of attesting acclaim, testified to 
some of our enthusiasm, but the artist, 
herself is the most convincing of all 
arguments for her triumphs as a fam- 
ous tragedienne. There are so few oi 
them, these da) S ' 

Mine. Kalich has surrounded herself 
with a company of excellent players, 
each, in turn, adding luster to the pro- 
luction, and at all times enhancing the 
power and the ability of this glorious 
actress. Her interpretation of Magda, 
the unhappy heroine of the play. was. 
in some instances, original and start- 
ling — but none the less powerful. She 
uses her voice as if playing on some 
line instrument, where, at will, she 
changes from fiery passion and emo 
tion to the soft modulated tones of deli 
cac\ personified. In fact. I acknowl 

fcdge that the \ oice of Mine. K.iln h, 
fascinates this critic, almost as much 
as the other dramatic arts she so las 
cinatingU demonstrates. 

Edward Fielding as tin- father, iron 

willed, unbending ami hard as nail-, at 
times ; then tender as a child ; tlesei '- ' 

a paragraph himself in exploitation of 

his , Iranian, work lie is consistent 

h appealing although one does not 
Sympathize with his domineering at 
titudc. Fielding is really magnificent, 
compelling, forceful ' 

In, i Man's, a- the younger dutiful 
daughter is charming, prcttv and grace 
lul. Louise, the wife and stepmother, 

is refreshing. 1 liked, too. the hand- 
some youth, Misha Alter, true to his 
1 cannot sa\ enough for 1 .con 
aid Mudie, who, in his characterization 
of the pastor, an used ni\ ardent ad- 
miration and respect. lie plays the 
role ol in, parson without once drop- 
into the maudlin, or the common- 
place, lie exalts his sacred profi 

id he is. withal, man full > consist 
cut. 

Warhurton Gamble made much of his 
part as the "cause" in his role of Coun- 
sellor; Lester Uden. Jerome Colla 
and Marv llubbard in her thrill- 



ing role, were capable players in sup- 
port of ,\l me. Kalich. 

Monday night, January 17. Mine. 
Kalich will be seen in "The Kiddle Wo- 
man," based on a play by C. Jacobi, and 
never before presented before San 
Francisco audiences. 

In her curtain call speech the open- 
ing night, the famous tragedienne ex- 
pressed her keen delight in appearing 
before Californians in her first long- 
play, here. She spoke, sincerely, feel- 
ingly, and won again the plaudits of 
enthusiastic admirers and devotees. 

St. Francis 

Harold Lloyd, starring in "The Kid 
Brother," will be on the screen at the 
St. Francis theater, beginning Satur- 
day, lanuary 15, in one of bis latest 
classic comedies. 

"The Kid Brother" is the story of the 
youngest son of a family of three bro- 
thers who, with their father, control the 
mountain town where they live. Lloyd 
takes the part of the youngest and 
gives plenty of pep to the play with its 
merry pranks and wholesome humor. 

The I). W. Griffith picture, "Sorrows 
of Satan" filmed from Marie Corelli's 
novel, concludes its engagement on Fri- 
da\ Ricardo ( ortez, Carol Dempster 

ami Lya de Plltti are the stars in this 
powerful photoplaj which has been 
drawing crowds to the St. Francis 
theater. 

Tin- premiere presentation ot "The 
Kid Brother" al the St. Francis, regis 
another triumph for this progress- 

, oid enterprising picture house of 
the Publix Theaters. 

* * * 
Fantages 

Pantages theater will, this coming 

week, present its second annual "In- 
i ircus" for which elaborate prep 
ions have been made, and which 
she uld prove a drawing card of es 

interest to patrons ,,f Pantages. 

"Summei Bachelors," -tarring Madge 
Bellamy in a stor) by Warner Fabian, 
author of "Flaming Youth," concluded 
its run Friday. Stage attractions were 
•The Golden Violin." a musical phen- 
omenon, and other acts this past week, 
meeting with special favor by the the- 

patrons 

* * * 

Warfield 

This week's attraction at the War- 
field theater will be the -creeii feature. 

"The Lunatic starring Leon 

Enrol, famed musical comedy star in a 
coined> picture which place< Dorothy 
Mackaill in the heroine role. 

This picture is an adaptation of J 
Storer CloUSton's three famous books 
on lunatics Full sway is given Frrol 
anil this new film i- said to be one of 
his hesi Fred Xewmcyer. 



who directed Harold Lloyd in his com- 
edies, is the director of this picture. 

The Warfield stage presentation, of- 
fered by Fanchon and Marco, will be 
"Yachting." Ilelene Hughes, the feat- 
ured star, will have the Warfield group 
of girls in a clever number including 
the adagio team of dancers, Al Le 
Claire and Alyce Haase, also featured 
dancers. Rube Wolf and his greater 
band of talented musicians supply mu- 
sical entertainment. 



Opera Star Sings 

With Stringed Orchestra 

Anna Young, beautiful operatic star 
of the San Francisco ( )pera Company, 
was the assisting solo artist at the 
Symphony Concert given by the Min- 
etti orchestra last Thursday night in 
Scottish Rite Hall, before a large and 
appreciative audience. 

Miss Young first sang a group of 
three songs: Overture, " Rosanumde," 
Schubert; Songs, "Lullaby," Cyril 
Scott: "Serenade," Sinigaglia. Her 
second group included "La Fille F.xi- 
geante," Sinigaglia, sung for the first 
time in America. The Mozart sym- 
phony in F. flat opened this group. 
which the singer gave with such rare 
true tones and faultless musicianship 
that, again and again. Miss Young was 
encored. Her stage presence, her 

beauty and thorough understanding of 
her art place this young opera singer 
high in the reckoning of vocalists, es- 
pecially pleasing and memorable being 
her interpretation of Musetta's "Song" 
in which she made herself known dur- 
ing the recent opera season. 

* * * 
Cameo 

"Forlorn River" filmed from a Zane 
Grej story, will be screened at the 

popular Cameo theater on Market 
street right opposite Fifth street, be- 
ginning a four days' engagement on 
Saturday, January 15. with Jack Holt 
beading the cast He appears in the 

role of "Nevada." 

Raymond Hatton, in the role of "Ar- 
izona Pete" is a principal. Edmund 

Burns. Tom Santschi and Arlette Mar- 
chal are in the cast. The stor\ i~ a 
melodramatic outdoor thriller in which 
romance, adventure and cattle rustlers 
arc placed with the Zion National Park 
and Rrice Canyon in Utah, the settings 
for the exciting action. It is a story of 
Nevada, an outlaw, and a fugitive of 
justice being the principal character. 

"The Campus Flirt" full of college 
veils and snappy romance comes to the 
Cameo. Wednesday, for a run of three 
days. Bebe Daniels appears in the lead 
ing part. James Hall. Joan Sta 
and Jocelyn Lee are in 
intiaoed on 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 193 






By Antoinette Arnold 



California's Most 
Distinguished Women 

NOW we know who are California's most distinguished 
women, for "Who's Who in America" in the 1926-27 
edition tells us Who ! 

San Francisco has 12 out of the 125, so listed, as impor- 
tant enough to have their names enrolled in the new ap- 
praisement of women, according' to "Who's Who." 

Annette Abbott Adams, attorney-at-law, heads the list 
of San Franciscans. Mrs. Adams was appointed Assistant 
United States Attorney for Northern California, October 
14, 1914; appointed United States Attorney, July 25, 1918; 
appointed Assistant Attorney General of the United States 
in 1920, and was the first woman to fill these two positions. 

This eminent Californian has had many honors in San 
Francisco organizations and, in March of last year, Mrs. 
Adams was chosen to represent California on the honor 
roll of the American Women's Association at Madison 
Square Gardens, New York. She was named at the time as 
one of the distinguished women of America in receiving the 
signal honors. 

Notable women from all parts of the country were pres- 
ent at this representative gathering in New York, over 
which Kathleen Norris, California author, presided. 

Mrs. Adams is a member of the American Law Institute 
and of the California, the American and the San Francisco 
Bar Association. 

* + ^ 

Gertrude Atherton, novelist; Winifred Black (Annie 
Laurie), listed as a journalist, in the famous listing in 
"Who's Who," are San Franciscans of whom we are proud. 
Annie Laurie has endeared herself to thousands of devoted 
readers, and, when appearing in public, at notable events, 
she has multiplied her constituency by many thousands 
more. 

* * * 

Alice Eastwood, botanist; Katherine Edson. the only 
woman member west of the Mississippi of the Advisory 
Committee to the Conference on the limitation of. Arma- 
ment, held at Washington, D. C, and champion of the 
minimum wage law for women in California; Congressman 
Florence B. Kahn ; Grace E. McKinstrv. artist; Miriam 
Michelson, author; are other prominent Californians named 
in "Who's Who," which also contains the names of Amy E. 
Pope, Cornelia Quinton, Maud Raymond and Emma Wolf. 

* * * 

Wedding Days 

The husky new year has ushered into prominence many 
weddings during the first week of the calendar month, with 
many more wedding days to follow before January shall 
have closed her books. 

* * * 

Madison-Martin 

One of the most beautiful weddings of the past week 
took place last Wednesday when Miss Caroline Madison 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

On the Coail Highway Halfway Between San Franciieo and Lei Angela, 

An Inn of Unuaaal Excellence 

Vire or urit* for rmaarvationa on your next trip routA 



became the bride of Mr. Charles Oelrichs Martin. 

The ceremony was held at the home of the bride's sister, 
-Mrs. Wakefield Baker, on Broadway, Monseigneur Roger 
performing the marriage rites, with relatives and intimate 
friends attending. 

* # * 

Bridal Gown 

The bridal gown was of exquisite white satin edged with 
pearl beads. A long court train was covered with a filmy 
tulle wedding veil held by a band of pearls. The bride's 
bouquet was of orchids, gardenias and lilies of the valley. 

Caroline Madison was a beautiful bride, looking the 
picture of loveliness. Mrs. Baker, her sister, and Miss 
Isabelle Wheaton were her attendants. Mrs. Baker wore 
a gown of shell pink satin trimmed with rare lace and she 
carried pin roses. Miss Wheaton was dressed in green 
satin and lace and she also carried pink roses. 

The best man was Mr. John Wholley. The ushers were: 
Mr. Edward McNear, Mr. Lalor Crimmins, Mr. Richard 
Burke, Mr. John Brooke. Jr., Mr. Marshall Madison and 
Mr. Charles Fay, Jr. 

* * * 

Wedding Bells 
Masten-Osborne 

Wedding bells rang merrily for Miss Kathryn Masten 
on New Year's Day, when she became the bride of Mr. 
Egbert Osborne at a beautiful marriage ceremony held at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. 
Masten in Washington street. The marriage rites' were read 
by Rev. D. J. Phillips of St. John's Presbyterian Church. 

The bride's wedding dress was of beige crepe, with which 
she wore a large picture hat of the same soft colorings. 
Her corsage was of gardenias. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. 
Masten and the sister of Mrs. Rupert Mason, Mr. Kendall 
Masten and Mr. Stewart Masten. She is the granddaughter 
of the late Mr. and .Mrs. James L. Martel and the late Mr. 
and Mrs. N. K. Masten. Her aunts are Mrs. Charles J. 
Stovel and Miss Adele Martel. 

* * * 
Recent Bride 

The marriage of Miss Adelaide Griffith and Mr. Eric W. 
Cochrane took place December 29 and was one of the 
loveliest of recent society marriages. The bride is the 
daughter of Mrs. Charles L. Griffith and the late Mr 'Grif- 
fith. Her two sisters, Miss Alice and Miss Louise Griffith] 
were her bridesmaids. 

* * * 
Beautiful Wedding 

The marriage of Miss Geraldine Bliss and Mr. fohn 
Franklin Brooke, Jr., took place at St. Vincent de Paul's 
Church, followed by an elaborate reception at the home of 
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Richard O. Bliss, in Pa- 
cific Avenue. 

The bride wore a very handsome 



Vionnet gown made 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

850 Bu.b Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San PranoUeo 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



of white satin with long sleeves. The wedding- 
veil of tulle and point applique lace was held 
by a lace band across the forehead and two 
bands of small orange blossoms and silver 
wreaths. The bouquet was a shower of lilies 
of the valley. 

Miss Betty Oliver was the maid of honor 
and wore a gown of yellow chiffon made with 
flowing sleeves and a leaf flounce. 

* * * 
Bridesmaids 

The matron of honor and bridesmaids at- 
tending Miss Bliss at her wedding were Mrs. 
Gerald Herrmann, Mrs. Bliss Rucker, Mrs. 
John M. Boyden, Miss Cecile Brooke, Miss 
Mildred Long and Miss Barbara Bliss. 

They wore frocks of peach-colored chiffon, 
made like that of the matron of honor, and felt 
hats of the same color. 

Little Miss Jane Spieker, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Warren Spieker, was the flower girl 
and wore a dress of white lace over peach- 
colored satin. She carried an old-fashioned 
bouquet of lilies of the valley and peach- 
colored roses.' 
The Best Man 

Mr. Charles Oelrichs Martin was the best man and the 
ushers were Mr. Jol 
I'oiter Sesnon, Mr. 
and Mr. William de 




in Boyden, Mr. Pardow 
Frank W. Fuller, Mr. I 
Koch of I. os Angeles. 



HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

260 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Hooper, Mr. 
enry Cartati 



Richard ( ). 
a graduate 

and ''f the 



Franklin 

a grand- 



Prominent Families 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mis. 
Bliss and a sister of Miss Barbara Bliss. She i- 
of the Sacred licit Convent in Menlo Park 
Finch School in New York. 

Mr. Brooke is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Brooke and a brothei of Mis, Cecile Brooke, lie i- 
son of the pioneer banker, the Kite Mr. Edward McLaughlin 
of San Jose. 

* * * 

Mrs. Beckman's Salon 

Mrs. William Beckman, author, world-traveler and phil- 
osopher and philanthropist, gave the first of the series of 
her Salon Des Artistes last Saturday night in the Stewar) 
Hotel, where a number "i distinguished writer-, composers, 

musicians and prominent business men gathered at the 
round table. 

The Salon Des Artistes, according to the high standard 
set by Mrs. Beckman, will include in its personnel oiil\ 

those who have made outstanding achievements in the 

world of literature, in music or in the world of finance. Her 
initial Salon was so brilliant in its appointments and in its 
galaxy of people that those who attended assured the host- 
ess that nothing like it in prestige and standards was known 
this side of \ew York. 

Mrs. Beckman is the author of books of philosophy and 

interesting world-travel experiences. She has established 

a chair at the University '-i California for the study of 

American and English literature and. for many years, lias 
been an acknowledged leader in society and literary events 
at Sacramento, where she ami her late husband p 
many years. Her scintillating wit. her brilliant rcpart. 
her wholesome philosophy of life have made her many 
ardent friends throughout California. 

The Salon Pes Artistes is Mrs Beckman's original 
based on ideals ><\ literary and musical accomplishments. 

* * * 
Prominent People 

Mr. Harold Macdougall presided as master of ceremonies 
at Mrs. Beckman's Salon Des Artistes session, which was 



inaugurated with an elaborate dinner party fol- 
lowed by a program in which many of the 
artists present took part. 

Dr. John T. Grant opened the program with 
a group of original poems, ranging from the 
vein ol comedy to the serious. lie gave, upon 
request, "Flirting With The Undertaker," with 
a slant on life and its vicissitudes that was cer- 
tainly subtle and clever. 

Original compositions were played by Cecil 
Hollis Stone, some of the songs being sung by 
Mr. Ervin Holton, with the composer at the 
piano. 

Virginia Treadvvell, contralto, sang a group 
of three songs, including "The Broken Trail," 
set to music by Mrs. Stone. Mrs. C. Victor 
Smith played a group of violin solos, includ- 
ing "Hymn to the Sun," with Miss Claire Mc- 
Clure at the piano. 

Miss Rosalie Harrison read several of her 
own poems and Miss Marceline Armstrong 
gave three brilliant recitations. 

Josephine Swan White, prominent in musi- 
cal circles about the bay cities, presented a 
group of her matchless cantillations. She gave, upon re- 
quest, "The House By the Side of the Road," followed bv a 
tribute, "To the Woman of the Home," written by Josephine 
Wilson. 

* * * 

World Traveler Speaks 

Mrs. John Donovan, who with her husband and Mr. and 
Mr-. Beckman and the late Mr. William Beckman, toured 
the world several times and has but recently returned from 
Europe again, gave an illuminating talk on some of the 
places she visited. Mrs. Donovan gave graphic descrip- 
tions of Roumania as she saw the country. 

Mrs. Oscar Maillard Bennett, distinguished reader, gave 
excerpts from Sacramento papers in tribute to the hostess, 
Mrs. Beckrrtan, following the brilliant talk flashing with rare 
humor with which the hostess opened this remarkable Salon 

1 lis Vrtistes. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Moore, Mr. and Mrs. George Davis, 
Mr. Charles Cunningham. Miss Alice Marsh were other 
prominent members of the Salon attending the initial event 
and banquet. Mrs. Walter Longbotham of Sacramento 
told of Mrs. Beckman's place in the Capital City, her en- 
couragement to striving artists and sang a group of Irish 
ballads as her contribution to the program. 

Mr. Harold Macdougall sang "Annie Laurie" with the 
feeling and musical understanding for which he is famed as 
a concluding number to the first program of the Salon Des 
Artistes, comprising both men and women of outstanding 
achievements. * * * 

Costume Ball 

\ brilliant costume ball will be given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Cliff Weatberwax tonight. Saturday, January 15. at the 
Burlingame Country Club. 

It will be a red and white ball, and many of the costumes 
planned are original and most attractive. For the past sev- 
eral winters Mr. and Mrs Weatberwax have given a fancy 
drc-s ball. Last season they gave a head-dress ball, when 
all of the guests appeared in fantastic head covering 

* * * 

Many Dinner Parties 

Many dinners are being planned before the dance, among 
those who will be dinner hosts being Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz, Mr. and Mrs. K. 
Walker Salisbury and Mrs. Richard McCreery Mr. Mc- 
( reel v is ill mourning mil of the recent death of his 

brother, Mr. Lawrence McCreery, and is mil taking part 
•ial affair- at present. 

(Continued on Page IT. 



t 



10 



Till' SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 




C. J. Pennington 

Power Supply 

WE HAVE continued to receive 
requests as to the best method to 
employ in obtaining- the power supply 
for the operation of radio sets. It has de- 
veloped from these requests that every- 
one has some preference. For that rea- 
son we do not feel inclined to state 
what we think is the best, for should 
we make such a statement someone is 
apt to take issue. Taking the only 
course possible, we will explain the dif- 
ferent methods which may be employed 
and leave the rest to the readers. 

A radio set requires two sources of 
power (that is, every set with the ex- 
ception of the crystal set). One current 
to light the filaments of the tube and 
the other to furnish the plate voltage, 
which, in turn, determines the volume 
of the set. 

The method which most everyone 
seems to agree upon to supply the fila- 
ment current is that of the storage 
battery, with a trickle charger at- 
tached. 

There are several makes on the mar- 
ket, all of which are very much alike. 
Some are the bulb type and others the 
acid type; however, they are all hooked 
to a storage battery and perform the 
same function ; so, apparently, there is 
not a great deal of choice in any par- 
ticular make. They perform the service 
of supplying the necessary current to 
the battery, which, in turn, lights the 
filaments of the tubes and requires no 
attention other than the adding of dis- 
tilled water at intervals. 

The plate voltage, or the B current, 
seems to be the method which has. and 
is, causing much controversy. Some 
prefer dry B batteries; others, wet B 
batteries ; and still others have a prefer- 



ence for the eliminator. The dry B 
battery is very good and no objection 
can be offered against them other than 
they will not deliver the full rated volt- 
age necessary for the proper operatic; 
of the receiver over a long period ol 
time, and it soon becomes necessary to 
replace them in order to keep the set 
up to standard. 

The wet B battery is an excellent 
battery. It is quiet in operation and 
may be recharged as often as neces- 
sarv. However, the wet B battery re- 
quires much attention. Mich as the fill- 
ing of the cells with distilled water and 
the recharging, at least once a month, 
to keep them at their best. A great 
many users prefer wet B batteries, due 
to their long life and dependability to 
furnish an even flow of current at all 
times. 

The other source of power supply is 
the B battery eliminator, which many 
persons have been skeptical of to a cer- 
tain extent. They have heard so much 
about eliminators that they can hardly 
believe all they hear; especially when 
some have had an expensive experi- 
ence with one. Today B eliminators 
are successful and the better makes on 
the market will deliver full rated volt- 
age for the life of the tube in them. 
After the tube has burned out it may be 
replaced and the eliminator is new 
again. The tube in high-class elimi- 
nators carries a guarantee of 1000 
hours continuous operation and will 
undoubtedly last much longer. 

There is no question about the elimi- 
nator being a successful method of sup- 
plying the current to the plate of the 
lubes. A good eliminator is quiet in 
operation, has no cells to fill with dis- 
tilled water, no attention being neces- 
sary, provided it is of the bulb type, 
and it will deliver full rated voltage 
over a long period of time. 

So. form your own conclusions. 



Radio Control 

Unless Congress acts, without fur- 
ther delay, to regulate radio broadcast- 
ing, there will be more than 1,000 sta- 
tions on the air. most of them claiming 
"squatter rights," to harass and annoy 
the listener ho wants good programs 
and wants them without interference. 

'I he listener wants radio controlled 
and doesn't care whether it's regulated 
by a Secretary ol Commerce, appointed 
by the I 'resident, or by a special com 
mission appointed by the President 
The recent Supreme Court decision to 
(Continued on Page 14) 




Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE. SAN FRANCISCO — 428.3 

Sunday, January l*f 

9:46 to 1U:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

2:40 I-- 4:15 p. m. — Concert of the San Pian- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion in .Mireii ) u-, iz, bi oadcast by i^l' 1 ', 
KGO ;.nr] K FI. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

6:30 p. in. — General information. 

>,::::. to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
« - J ■ * stra. 

S:35 to 10:00 |>. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concerl 
I Irchesl ra, 

10:00 t<> 12:00 ].. m. — John Wolohun and ins 
Californians. 

Monday* January 17 

6:45, 7 : 1 r> . 7:45 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 
10:30 a. in. — Weather forecast. 

10 15 a. in — ii - Service Talk. 

12:00 i H — Tim. signals, Scripturu readings 

1:00 io 2:00 p. m. — Fal in Hotel Concerl 

Orchesti a, 

30 i" 5 :30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concerl OH 

chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

i'. 15 io 6:30 p. m. — Stock ma. ket quotal a 

k : :; ti to 7:00 p. m. — StaU-s Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

, mi to 7:30 p, m. — Fairmont Hotel Concerl 
i trches! ra, 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 8:10 i). m. — Chamber of Commerce talk 

8:10 to 8:25 p. m. — Book reviews. 

I :25 to 9:00 p. m. — Bridge lesson No. 13. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. in. — Billy I g's Cabirlana 

11:00 to 12:00 v- m. — KPO Variety Hour. 

Tiiesiinv. January ih 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m.— Daily Health Drill. 
10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 
10:45 a. m.— < looking hints and recipes. 
12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 
1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fail mom Hotel Concer 

Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m.— Palace Hotel Concert Or-] 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

i;:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches 
t ra. 

7:00 to 7 30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 t<> S:uo p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — "Uda Waldrop Hour." 

'. to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. in. — Billy Long's Cablriansj 

Wednesday. January 10 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Dally Health Drill. 

10:30 a. in.— Weather forecast. 

1 1): -15 a. m.— Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concerl 
Orchestra. 

:; :;n to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concerl Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

fi-15 to e-sn p , m — S"ock ma-k t (imitations 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:{ii p. ni. — Fairmont Hoi.i Concerl 
Orclies,ti a, 

7:30 tn R:00 p. m. — DX. 

S:o0 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 
9:00 to l a : mi p. m. — Studio program. 
Hi' j 11:00 p. ni. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

I I oil I,, I- in - .i..hn Wolohan 1 his 

< 'alit'ot n ians. 

TliurMthi> , .la a mi r\ -»:■ 

1 '5. 7:15, 7:45 a, m —Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10: 15 a. in.- ' booking hints and recipes 

12:00 noon— Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1 :00 to Mm p, m. — Fairmont Hotel Concerl 
• M chesl ra, 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



3 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

,t:30 io t>:l» p. m. — Children's hour. 

t> :30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 

.ihi to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to S :00 p. in. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Hestaurant Or- 
chestra. 

tl:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
i lalifornians. 

I'i ii)a>. Jimuary 21 

ti:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion Talk. 

1(0:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1 ;30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concei t 
Orchestra. 

3:30 in 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

>■ i .". to ti:30 p. m. — Stock ma.ket quotations. 

i;;:;ii to 7;2u p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
i ra. 

7:20 in 7:30 p. m. — "Sports on the air." 

T;:;u in 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

Mini to 10:ii0 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

li;ini to 12:00 p. m. — .John Wolohan and his 
< lalifornians. 

Saturday* January 22 

R:46, 7:15. 7:45 a. m.— Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:1." a. m. — - Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

I iin (o 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Oncer! 
• (rchestra, 

80 (<> 5:^d p. in. — Palace lintel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

R;15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock markel quotations. 

G:30 to 7:30 p. m.— States Restauranl Orches- 
tra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

BOO t" 9:00 v. m. — Si in ul i ;i neous broadcast 
by KPO and KFI. 

h00 in 10:00 p. m, — Palace I lotel i >ance < n - 
dies Ira. 

10:ini in 11:00 p. in, — Walter Krausgrrill's Or- 
che.sl ra. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Dully Kxerpt Sunday 

:< in 11:30 a. in. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Select inn, 
1:00 in i mi p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Select ions. 



KGTT — <;i..Yl> TIDINGS TEMPI. K, s\% 
FRANCISCO— 201 

Sunday, .lanunrj Hi 

■SO i" 3:00 p. in-- Suiiita> si : 

3:iin in 6:00 p. m. — Temple 

8:00 in 10:00 p mi Evi i vice. 

Hominy, J n niiary 17 

i ' 30 in i 00 p. in, — Daily Scripture reading 

Tuenduy, January is 

I ' 10 tO 1 'Ml p in - 1 '.Mix Sri i, n 

\ nn to 10:00 v in - Studio pi "l:i am. 

\\ ednenda? . January H> 

I I 30 in i I'n p. iii — i M ii\ Sci Ipturv reading 

i- ' p. m l ovine healing sei * li 

n mi in in mo p m Studio prog-ram. 

Tlmr ndn? . ,liiiMinr> -O 

■ to i mo P m Dailj Scrlpl adl na*. 

Ktidn>. January -i 

to i Mil p in L>aily S Ldlng 

s i' 1 mm p m.— Studio program 

|:00 m i oo p in —Sunshine hour. 

Saturday, January 22 

18:30 to 00 p '.,:!>■ SCI IptUP H adlng 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO- 
OAKLAND— 361 



sbyti ri;iii « 'hurcl 



Inndaj . January IQ 

■f 1'! 

sco Sj mphony > •rclies- 
i on p. m. — Vesper I edrat. 

l> m Imhi'.-. S> niph.Ti> ■ ■ 

m w i-.ii her bureau > ■ 

l -i isi>\ tertan i '*• •-.• ■ 
- taklaml 

P in i:. in > >\ mphon> ■ k 

!l;i 

Monday, Jannarj IT 



1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:43 p. m.— Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

5:80 in 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddles* Klub. 

|i:U0 tu 6:5;. p. m.— Bern's Little Symphony. 

b:o5 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:08 p. in.— S. F. Product*. Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m.— N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
nil p. m . — s. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Tuesday, January IK 



1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

':00 p. m, — Housekeeper's chat. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

T;03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing-). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 

Pilgrims." 
9:00 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 

Wednesday, January IP 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

J:4:> p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 1:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington concert. 

1:00 p. in. — Housekeeper's chat. 

5:30 p. m. — "For instance," by General Jack- 
son. 

6:00 m 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

t:5S p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. in. — s. !•'. Produce, Grain, Cotton. and 
Metals. 

7:11 p. m. — X Y. Stock reports (closing) 

7:21 p. m.— S. F. Stock reports (closing) 

8:00 p. in.— is. F\ Studio) Farm Program 
tseM.'si "Functions of (he state Depart- 
ment of Agriculture." 

8:10 p. in. (Sei les) "The Cattle Industry on 
the Pacific i loast." 

8:20 p. m. — An interview with the Agricul- 
tural Economist. 

8 30 p, m. — W. U.W.Male Trio. 

8:40 p m. Address. 

9:00 p. in —W. ( «, \v. Male Trio. 

Thuraday, January 20 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks 
1 .37 p. in.— S. F. Stocks. 
i:i- p. in. — Weather. 

" i<>" !• "' - -Hotel Leamington conci rl 

00 I- m Housekeepers 1 chat 

00 to 6:00 p. m, — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 

in i toys," 
00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

56 p. 111. N'eWS. 

03 p. m. — Weather. 

06 p. m. — S. F. Produce. Grain, Cotton, and 

11 p. in — N. Y. Stocks (closing). 
S. F. Stocks (closing). 
00 m •' oo P ui Concert by KG( i I 
Symphony Oi cheatra, Carl Rodehamel con- 
duct iiiK 
00 to 12:00 i> m. — Phil Lampkin's Musical 



i old * . Jnitiuirt 21 

i l" :i in- — Prudi Homemaking 

Talk 

80 p. m — N. Y. Stock reports. 

37 p. in — S. F. Stock rep 

12 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

i on p. in — Hotel Leamington Concert, 
oo p. m.— Hou chat. 

56 p. in. Bern's Little Symphony 
;.;. p. i 

p, m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7 <o; p ni s F, Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Mel 

7:14 p ra X. Y, Stock t > pi (cloa tng I. 

7:31 p. in — S F. stock reports (closing). 

8 00 to ■■• 00 p m (S P Studio) Program. 

Saturday. Jnnunrj 23 

S Weather Bureau report. 
p m — N V Si 

IS I" p. in. — S F Stocks. 

p. m.— Hotel Leamington Concert. 
in — Housekeeper's chat. 

Review." by Al 
Sanl 

p. m — Program from the Hotel 

a ni. — Wilt liun7.endoi fer's 

■ 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE. OAK- 
LAND— 509 

:<itmIii* . Jnniini » I 7 

least, 
program, 
-kly meet! 




San Franchsco's smartest rendezvous . . . 
•where Eddie Harkness and his Orchestra bare 
icon the hearts of the city 's smart set! 

TEA 1>ANSANT rMonfay and Saturday 
Afternoons, four 'til six. One Dollar. 

CONCERT TEA rTues.. Wed.,Thur., Fri. 
Afternoons, four 'til six, Fifty Cents. 

DINNER DANCE, Nightly (except Sun.) 
seven 'til ninc.T^ble d'Hote, Two-fifty. 
No Couvcrt for Di nner Guefts. 

SUPPER 'DANCE , Nichtly (except Sun.) 
nine "til one, Couvcrt Tifry Cents; Satur- 
day, Couvert One Dollar. 

Cuitint by Vi8or 




Jollow the 

Qolden c Rocid 

to Health! 



Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 6:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1922 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Tuesday, January 18 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, January 1!) 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Special progiam. 

Thursday, January 20 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday. January 21 

7:00 t 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Program. 
9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Or- 
chestra, 
Saturday. January '2'2 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday* January 10 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday School Les- 
son, 
4:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Sacred Songs. 

Monday, January 17 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
Wednesday, January Ut 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
8:00 p. m. — Saci ed songs. 

Thursday, January 20 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sacred variety program. 

Friday, January 21 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Bible Study Hour. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sacred Variety Program. 

S:00 p. m. — Telephone or wiite in your health 
questions and they will be informally dis- 
cussed. 

Saturday, January 22 

1:30 to 2:30 p. m. — Children's Church Broad- 
cast. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
Forecast; (b> Announcements of Churches 
for Sunday. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 
Sunday, January lti 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Prof. A. E. Linsley's Bible 

class. 
11:00 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
7:45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 

Monday, January 17 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to b:0u p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Shopping Hour. 
i;:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Request numbers by Senor 
Antonio de Grassi, violinist. 

Tui'NiIaj, January IS 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "'The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — ""Diet and Health." 

5.uu to 6:uo p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

B:00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 

Stamp Collectors. 
S:15 to 10:00 p. m. — The KTAB Quartet. 

Wednesday, January 11) 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Part I. Classic music. 
Part II. Popular music. 

Thursday, January 20 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

Friday, January 21 



S:45 to 9:15 a. m.- 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m.- 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.- 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m.- 

U'orniii. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m 



-"The Hour of Prayer." 
-Shopping Hour. 
-Children's Hour. 
— Shopping Hour. 
■Program by American Pen 

— Goat Island Goats. 



Saturday, January 22 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

KRE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 
Sunday. January 10 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Church Service. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner Concert. 
8:15 to 9:00 p. m. — Social concert. 

Monday, January J7 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday, January 18 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news, 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Wednesday, January 1J> 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 
5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

Thursday* January 20 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday* January 21 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Saturday. January 22 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance program. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 
(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 
Sunday, January 10 

10:00 a. m. — Church Services under direction 
of L. A. Church Federation. 

11:00 a. m. — Temple Baptist Church services 

2:45 p. m. — Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia presents San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. Alfred Hertz, Conductor: broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI, KPO, KGO. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:45 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat and 
Father Ricard's Sun Spot weather forecast 

7:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital; Alex 
Reilly at the console. 

8:00 p. m. — Packard Classic Hour. 

9:00 p. m. — Bob Bottger and his Venetians 
Dance Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill 
Hennessey, Director. 

Monday, January 17 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:20 to lu:40 a. m. — Furnishings for the 
Home by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Goid 
Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m.— Food Talks by Agnes 
White. 

5:30 i m Virgil lily's winter Garden Or- 
chestra. 

6:uu p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. in.— KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial IVi iod. Georg< 
Wilder Cartwright, talks on the Constitu- 
tion. 

6:35 p. m. — Virgil Ray's Winter Garden Or- 
chesti a. 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Calif Or nians 
Starke Sisters (Minnie and Maude). 

8:00 p. m. — Brahms Quartet. Keren/. Sterner. 
cellist — La Verne Beal. pianist. 

9:00 p. m. — Semi-classical music program. 
10:00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, January IS 

r>::!0 p. in. — Matinee Program 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m . — KFJ Radio Travel Guide 

6:20 p, m._ Dr. John T. Miller, "Human Na- 
ture Around the World." 

6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

i :00 p. m, — Paul Howard's Quality Seren- 
adera, 

B:00 p. m. — Gattone String Quartet. 

9:00 p. m. — Gleaners Quartet — Thomas Wal- 
lace, ha ritone. 

10:00 i>. m.— Azure Music Club, Clarice Rus- 
sell, blues singer; Belly ColHtOU illld Bill 

Parker and Edna Cook: Esther Walker 
pianist. 



Wednesday) January III 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 

by Georgia O. George. 
10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on Child Training 

by Agnes White. 
10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 

Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 
11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnes 

White. 
5:30 p. m. — Matinee program. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 
6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 
7:00 p. m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians. 
7 : Hit p. m. — Nick Harris. Detective Stories; 
8:00 p. m. — Calpet Male Quartet, Paul Roberts] 

tenor, and Calpet Orchestra. 
9:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy, contra-contralto; 

S A. 1. Trio. 
10:00 p. m. — Sunset Instrumental Quartet — 

Dorothy Ruth Miller, concert pianist, Paul 

Weber, baritone. 



ThurNdny, January 20 

5:30 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by University of South- 
ern California. 

8:00 p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 

9 00 p. m. — Popular program. 

10:00 p. m. — Johnston & Farrell'8 Music Box 
i [out . 



Friday, January -i 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on home manage- 
ment by Ag nes White. 

10:40 to 1 t :00 a. m. — Betty Crocker. Gold 
Medal Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 — Food Talks by Agnes White. 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee progiam. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

r:00 1 1. m. — -Program by Paul Roberts and 
L< slie Adams, whistler, 

S:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Alex Reil- 
ly at the console. 

:>-nn ]i 111. — Alma Frances Gordon, contralto. 
i ■. l Monte Siring Trio. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour; J. Maurice 
w Is, i !a ritone. 



Saturday* January -- 

5:30 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Angeleno Ag- 

gravators. 
6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 
din p . m . — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
6:20 p. m. — Madame Nelson. 

6:35 p. m.— Program by Uusmmii Ac;nlemy of 

Musical Ait — Boris Myronoflf, Piano. 

7:00 p. m. — Instrumental music. 

7:30 p, in — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Lyric 
baritone — Bdna Clark Muir, pianist 

S:00 p. m.- Grand Opeia, "Faust," with Vir- 
ginia Flchri. Mam ine Dyer, Roberl rlurd, 

9:00 p. m. — Popular Program. 

m (mi p. ni. — Packa d Radio Club — Esther 
Walker, pianist; Helen Guest. 

11:00 D. m.— KFI Midnight Frolic; Virgil 
Ray's Winter Garden Orchestra- 




January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



13 



KNX- 



L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 



Dnlly Except Sunday 



7:30 a. m.- 
8:00 a. m 

prayer. 
8:55 a. m. 
9:00 a. m. 
10:30 a. m. 

day and 
12:00 m. — 
2:00 p. m 

day. 
4:55 p. m. 
5:30 p. m, 
6:00 p. m.- 
6:15 p. m. 
6:30 p. m 



-KNX Morning Gym. 
—Inspirational talk and mornine 

-Time Signals. 

^Shopping News. 

-Household Economics except Fri- 

Saturday. 
-George Redmond's Orchestra. 
— Musical program — except Satur- 

— Market reports. 

. — George Redmond's Orchestra. 

—The Town Tattler. 

— W. F. Alder Travelogue. 

— Atwater Kent orchestra. 



Sunday, January Hi 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

6:30 p, m. — First Unitarian Church. 

7:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 

8:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature Program. 

Monday, January 17 

3:00 p. m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 
4:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 
4:30 p. m. — Blue Monday Frolic. 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
7:30 p. m. — Playlet. 
8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Tuesday, January is 

3:00 p. m. — Combined program by Police and 

Fire Depts. 
\ 100 p. in. — I ladio matinee. 
7 DO p. in. — Courtesy progra m. 
7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 
8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
fl:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
I0:oo p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 



Wednesday, January lit 

4:00 p. m.— Talk on care of children. 

( :00 p. tn. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p. m. — Feature program, 

$:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Thursday, January 20 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Friday, January 21 

3:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 



a ii u a i- > 22 

-The Town Crier of the Day and 



Saturday, 

3:00 p. m.- 
his pals, 

7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 

7:15 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices of the leading Los Angeles churches. 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — KNX Frolic from the main studio. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN. PORT- 
LAND— 491.5 

Sunday. January US 

10:55 to 12:30 p. m. — Morning services. 
7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 
9 to L0:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Monday, January 17 

7:16 a. hi, — Setting up exercises. 

in tin to 11:30 a. ni. — Mns if, weather report, 

household he] ps 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 



6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

• to 7:80 p. in. — Children's Program. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 i" 9:30 p. m. — Vaudeville entertalnmenl 

9:30 to LO.OO p. m, — Portland Symphonj 0] 

chestra. 
9:15 in 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, January 18 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health Exer- 
cises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 
huiiKi'htild helps. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Wednesdays January 10 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Utility service. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Albers Poultry School. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Tliui-Nday, January 20 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility Service. 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 

Friday, Jnnuary 21 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health exer- 
cises. 

1 it; no to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather n pari , 
household helps. 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:fin to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:3n to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
(Continued on Page 14) 



In justice to your pocket- 
book and to your reputa- 
tion as a judge of radio, 
please do one thing be- 
fore deciding upon any 
radio set: 




Model 59 

Price $195.00 Without Accessories 

Other Models $65.00 and up 

V/URLlIZER 



Hear the Thorola Model 
59 at any of our stores. 
It is absolutely the only 
way to be sure that your 
radio will be the very 
latest. 



250 Stockton Stri i i 



2345 Mission Stri i r 
Oaki «*o — 575 14th Street 



1543 Ocean AvENl i 

\si> 3351 Grand Avfm i 



Bbkkelev— 2223 Pelegraph \i e\i > 



Richmond— 913 M . Dov \u> Avenui 



4567 Mission Street 



San Awssi mo — J00 Main Street 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1927 



Radio Program for Next Week 



8:00 to S:30 p. m. — Weekly meeting of the 

KGW Movie Club. 
S:30 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weekly frolic of the 

Keep Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 

Saturday, January '22 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather report. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

10:00 t- 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



KJR- 



-NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 
SEATTLE— 384.4 

Sunday, January Hi 

11:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 

7-45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening Service 

9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under direction 
of Henry Damski. 

Monday. January 17 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m.— New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6-05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

610 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, January IS 

1000 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

605 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6-15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8-30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Wednesday, January 11> 

10-00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10-30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3-00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

C:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Thursday, January 20 

10-00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m, — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m, — KJR News Hems. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
11:00 p. ni. — Dance Music. 

Friday, January '21 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 
3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Saturday, January '2- 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. in. — Dance M 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 

— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday, January 1ft 



.Monday, January 17 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Children's hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

i>:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday. January US 

13:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Comedy sketch. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:4 5 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Farm question box. 

9:00 p. m. — Instruction in Auction Bridge. 

Wednesday. January 11> 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
fi:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 
7:30 p. m. — Wynken, Blynken and Nod. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
8:15 p. m. — K< >A Minstrel Show. 

Thursday. January '20 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

Kriday. January "21 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Instrumental Concert. 

1:00 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion Re\ iew. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:00 p .m. — "Aggie Kickoffs." 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 

school lesson. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
8:15 p. m. — Studio progiam. 

Saturday. January 1!2 

12:15 p. 
10:30 p. 



-Organ Recital. 
—Dance program. 



11:00 a 
6:30 p. 
7:15 p. 



— Church service. 
-Organ recital. 
-Evening service. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Sunday, January i<: 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Monday, January 17 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Announcements inter- 
spersed with musical numbei s. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items, 

8:00 to 9'00 p. m. — Program featuring Ken- 
neth Gillum, popular songs. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Bill Hatch and His Or- 
chestra. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tuesday, January IS 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what 
to buy." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Fran- 
ces St. George. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his Or- 
chestra, 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Babe Brown and his 
Ukelele. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday, January IK 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to -7:30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sun- 
shine. 

7 ;O0 tip 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what 
to buy." 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 tf> 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring Ann 
I Hi y blues. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Bill Hatch and his or- 
chestra. 
10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thursday. January 20 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 
7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what to 

buy." 



750 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Bill Hatch and his orches- 
tra. 
9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Edward Novis, baritone, 
10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, January 21 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — "Where to go and what to 
buy." 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. in. — Bill Hatch and his Or- 
chestra, 

9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Kenneth Gillum, popular 
songs. 

10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday. Januarj 22 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — "Where to go and what to 

buy." 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring Juno 

i \i rker, blues. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Peggy Mathews, blues. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 10) 

the effect that the President has the 
right to remove any official appointed 
K\ him puts the responsibilit) on the 
chief executive. 

The House passed the White Bill at 
the last session of Congress providing 
Eor Department of Commerce contro] 
of radio. The Senate passed the Dill 
Bill providing for control by a special 
commission. Since neither bill passed 
both houses, this resulted in no control 
and the present congestion of the air. 
Radio listeners should make it their 
business to let Congress know that 
(Continued on Page 1!>) 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

ivill bring 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements, 
Income Tax Reports. 

Expert Auditor 

Part-time Service 

268 Market St., Room 101 



CLUB 
Auto Service Co, 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



685 Post St. 
San Francisco 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

Largest American-Built Liner Will Be 
Christened "California" 

THE largest steamship to be built in an American yard, 
the 22,000-ton liner now under construction at New- 
port News for the Panama Pacific Line's intercoastal ser- 
\ ice, is to be named "California." 

Various names have been under consideration by officials 
If the line since the vessel's keel was laid, but a selection 
was deferred until the merits of suggestions from different 
fcurc'es could be weighed. Among' the names put forward 
were Monterey, from the old Pacific capital; Shasta, for 
northern California's tallest peak; Montezuma, for the last 
of the Aztec kings, and Sungaria, for the ancient interior 
province of northern China. The latter name, it was pointed 
out, was well adapted to a ship to sail in the same service 
with the "Manchuria" and "Mongolia." 

Decision to name the ship "California" was announced 
bv P. A. S. Franklin, head of the line, to business associates, 
as be was sailing from New York for Europe on November 
(.tb. 

Mr. Franklin said he was influenced in bis choice by a de- 
sire to express bis appreciation of the support given the 
Panama Pacific Line by California business and travel in- 
terests, as well as by eastern houses doing business with 
California, lie also wanted to show bis personal admira- 
tion for the state. 

Formal christening of the "California" will lake place on 
the occasion of her launching, which is scheduled for July 
next. She is expected to enter the intercoastal trade in the 
fall of 1927, with her first sailing from New York for San 
Diego, Los Angeles and San Francisco, set for the latter 
part of October. 

The "California" will be a notable vessel in several re- 
spects. Not only is she the largest American-built steam- 
Biip, hut she is the lirst large commercial vessel to he 
fcuipped with turbo-electric propelling machinery. Fur- 
ther, she is the onlj large liner in which there are no inside 
staterooms, ;il| | UM - rooms having outside light and ventila- 
tion. 

First class accommodations will include many room- with 
bath and a number of suite- with private sitting-room, bed- 
mom and hath. Public rooms will be furnished and decor- 
ated in the American Colonial style, and will contain mural 
paintings by a well known American artist, representing 
romantic and historical scenes connected with Spanish dis- 
covery and voyage- m the Pacific, and having special refer- 
ence to the Isthmus of Panama and the California coast. 

The new ship will resemble the transatlantic liner- "Min- 

nevv.i-ka" and "Minnetonka" of the Atlantic Trans 
1 inc. many of whose feature- have been incorporated in her 
design. She will have accommodations for 3S4 first class 
and 3i>.5 touri-t passengers, and capacity for 8,000 tons ot 
freight, including large refrigerated and cool air -pace for 
Calif irnia products. 

It i- expected that the construction of the "California" 
will he followed by that of two other ve--el- of similar type 
for the same service. The three ship- are reported to repre- 
sent an investment of aboul $21,000,000 



Job for a Good Samaritan 

A live-wire salesman rushed up to the home of ,, doctor 
in a small village about 3 a. m. and asked him to come, at 
once to a distant town. 

The doctor cranked his flivver and they drove furiously 
to their distillation. 

Upon their arrival the salesman asked, "Mow much is 
your fee, doctor?" 

"Three dollars," said the physician, in surprise. 

"Here you are," said the salesman, handing over the 
money, "the blamed garage keeper wanted $15 to drive me 
over when I missed my train." — Keystone Motorist. 
* * * 

Miracle Worker 

New Antiques. Dave Thoenen returned to the city last 
night from a few days' visit with his cousin who is engaged 
in making antique furniture. — News Item in a West Vir- 
ginia Paper. 



How to Torture a Tourist 

The Maid — "Yes, sir, your suit-case looked so untidy 
with all those old labels on it from fapan and America and 
Egypt and Africa that 1 thought I'd clean them all off."— 
The Passing Show. 



"I 



op 



Pa Knows All 

what's a philosopher?" 



"A chap who's too hard up to worry about it, son. 



Diplomacy 
'Jack, when we are married I must have three servants.' 
'You shall have twenty, dear; but not all at once." 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN 8c DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general aAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1927 




THE National City Bank of New York reports "The 
New Year opens with good prospects for the continu- 
ance of prosperity. The past year has been one of the most 
prosperous in the history of the country, but it closes with- 
out signs of either price or credit inflation. The general 
commodity price-level, as computed by Government agen- 
cies, is about six per cent lower than a year ago." 

* * * 

— Among the records noted for 1926 by J. T. Saunders, 
freight traffic manager for the Southern Pacific, is that one 
million freight cars were loaded each week, and seven mil- 
lions paid in taxes every seven days. The railroad taxes 
paid amounted to more than a million per day. The tax 
paid by each carload is approximately $5.25. The net reve- 
nue of each car is reckoned at about $35. So that the taxes 
run to about 15 per cent of the net revenue of each car. 

* * * 

— Old mining property discovered more than sixty years 
ago is to be reopened in an effort to obtain gold, according 
to the application of the Yosemite Gold Mining Company 
to the corporation commissioner, who has granted a permit. 

* * * 

— The American Rubber Corporation has been denied a 
permit to sell $50,000 worth of its stock in California. The 
company was founded to recover rubber from Guavule, a 
plant which grows wild in parts of Northern Mexico. The 
factory was to be established at Torreon. The present land 
dispute with the Mexican government is largely respon- 
sible for the denial of the permit. 

* * * 

— A notable expert has recently said "Overhead is mostly 
thought of as a fixed cost of operation, but overhead also 
includes intangible losses." The rush to increase volume 
without due consideration of its effects upon overhead is 
responsible for much avoidable loss. 

— The gain in efficiency of American railroading is al- 
most incredible, so rapidly is it overtaking all former rec- 
ords. For instance, on the Southern Pacific. locomotives 
gained nearly a mile a day. in average mileage operated and 
the percentage of locomotives in serviceable condition and 
not requiring heavy repairs averaged 79.4 per cent for 
eleven months. 

— The Pacific Gas and Electric Company will, according 
to P. G. and E. News Service, have a great construction pro- 
gram for 1927. "New plants will be added to the system of 
the company and present plants will be enlarged. The year 
1927 promises to be a busy one for the construction crews, 
They are now engaged on four big hydro-electric j.ibs in 
the_ Sierras and on many gas and electric construction and 
maintenance job- in the various cities served." 

* * * 

— The Santa Fe's 1927 Almanac has a <livisi.ni of the aver- 
age convention delegate's dollar, when he or she got- abroad 
in the land, as follows: Merchandise, $0.2o ■ Restaurant 
$0,235; Hotel, $0,208; Autos and gas, $0,115; Transporta- 
tion, $0.07; Taxis and street cars, $0,033; Amusements 
$0,025; Candy, cigars, etc., $0,059. Total, $1.00. 

* * * 

—It is stated by influential people that California is great- 
ly in need of several large resort hotels to accommodate 
great throngs of tourists for longer periods. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1863 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,550,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $565,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1CHT STREET BRANCH Haighl and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4Ji) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 

y -...--......■■■■...-..----------■ 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid tip Capital »2O,0O0,000 »20,000,000 Reierve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 600 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Asst. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




San Francisco, Calif. 
444 Market Street 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufactureri of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



Los Angeles, Calif. , 
S717 Santa Fe Avenue ( 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 

Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

108 Crocker Bnlldlne (Opposite Palace Hotel). Sun Fr.i,cl.ro 

Phone Kearny 391 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



SOCIETY 
(Continued from Page 9) 

For Nieces 

Mrs. George Cameron entertained at a tea dance last 
week at the DeYoutlg home in California street for her 
nieces, the Misses Patricia and Consuelo Tobin, the daugh- 
ters of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oliver Tobin. 

Small tables were placed around the sides of the ballroom 
with a miniature Christmas tree on each. 

Young People 

Among the young people present were Miss Evelyn Tay- 
lor, .Miss Happy Hamilton, Miss Peggy and Miss Evelyn 
Salisbury, Miss Leone Weeks, Miss Katherine Stent, Miss 
Florence McCormick, Miss Gloria Wood, Miss Marguerite 
Garceau, Miss Dominga Russell, Miss Aroline Hill, Miss 
Carol Lapham, Miss Edna Lapham, Mr. Orville Pratt, Mr. 
James V. Coleman, Mr. John S. Drum, Jr., Mr. Laurison 
Driscoll, Mr. Thomas Driscoll, Jr., Mr. Nicol Smith, Mr. 
John Sullivan, Mr. Charles R. McCormick, Jr., and Mr. 
Walter Newhall. 





Tel. Davenport 4980 

655 SACRAMENTO ST. 

Between Montgomery and 

Kearny Streets 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Betrothed 

College folks in the peninsula and bay cities are interested 
in the announcement of the betrothal of Miss Louise Lord 
Coleman and Mr. Theodore Carter Achilles. 

The engagement was told at an elaborate tea given at the 
Town and Country Club last Friday, when the mothers of 
the engaged pair told the happy news. Mrs. Charles B. 
Cleveland of Los Gatos and Mrs. Gertrude Strong Achilles 
of Morgan Hill presided over the reception and tea attended 
by prominent people from the college towns. 

The Cleveland and the Achilles families traveled through 
Europe together. Theodore Achilles, who was graduated 
from Stanford University with the class of '24, is now at 
Yale doing post-graduate work with Professor Baker's play- 
writing class. 

Miss Coleman is a University of California girl and a 
lappa, and many of her Sorority friends were present at 
the announcement tea. Plans for the wedding include i 
June marriage ceremony at the Los Gatos home of the 
bride-to-be. 

* * * 

Mrs. John Drum Hostess 

Mrs. John Drum was hostess to a number of the young 
society people last Saturday night at the Burlingame Coun- 
try Club, honoring Miss Virginia Patricia (lark, who jusl 
made her formal debut to Society. 

The event was particularly gay and festive, with any 
number of unusual attractions and charming decorations, 
typical of Mrs. Drum's notable affairs, (incsts at the danc- 
ing part\- included: Misses Patricia Clark, Cynthia Boyd, 
Mary Clark. Florence Loomis, Ynez Mejia, Martha Ran- 
some, Aileen Tobin. Francesca Deering, Gertrude Murphy, 
Claudine Spreckels, Dorothea Williamson, Janet Whitman; 
Messrs. George Newhall, Jr., Warren Clark, Kenneth 
Campbell, Allen Doyle. John Hooker, John Mo,, re. H 

Hates. Wallace Campbell, Thomas Driscoll. Osg I 

Honker. Neil Lilley, Barroll McNear, Vlbert Miller. Wil- 
liam Kuhn, William Tevis, Edward Munford, Reggie Bau- 
gh.ni. Kenneth Pope, Churchill Peters. Arthur Mejia. I.an- 
dis Knox, John Breeden, Negri Arnoldi, Augustus I 



New Room for Press Leaders 

Whenever the clubwomen want to raise some extra 
) they give a card party — and the result is. in practi- 
cally all instances, a substantial sum for their coffers 
the press committee are now going to give a card party, 
using the proceeds from the party for the furnishing of a 
(Continued on Page 1 Si 





- - - - - ■*-*■—————■»—"-——■*—"*"————■—■■— —*«^ 


Blips. 


Is 

i 


-4 U Rft REi DUURO 
j EARLY EDITIONS 

j Autographs Bought and Sold 
J.J JOHN HOWELL 

434 Post Strut, San Francisco, Calif. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ON L\ 

'/hosJUXent Shirts * IhosEKeai 

■SIIIF N,^o'L ^iy 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 371+ 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Strut 
In Virginia Hotel 
*.--__ ——— — -. 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Sam Francisc* 
Phonb Franklin 2510 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Eatabllahed 1804 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Donclai 3084 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th 9ts., 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



anuary 15. 1927 



SOCIETY 

(Continued trom Page 17 J 
press room in the Women's Building. Mrs. Helen Holt pre- 
sided at the meeting last week, when her press committee 
was appointed, including Mrs. Albert Musgrave, Mrs. H. D. 
Purcell, Mrs. J. R. O'Donnell, Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden and 
Mrs. A. W. Johnson. The party will be held at the Fair- 
mont Hotel. 

* * * 

Society Luncheon 

A number of society folks from the peninsula and bay 
cities gathered at the St. Francis Hotel last Monday for the 
Monday luncheon which is so rapidly becoming a weekly 
society day that many go there on this particular day just 
to see the fashionables in their smart attire. 

Groups who were lunching in the famous Fable Room in- 
cluded : Mesdames Ross Ambler Curran and George Cam- 
eron; Mesdames Edgar Preston and Frank Preston enter- 
taining guests. Mrs. Herbert Moffitt, Miss Alice Mofritt 
and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle. Mrs. Ernest Folger and Mrs. 
John McNear. Miss Ida Belle W'heaton and Mis- Eleanor 
Morgan. 

Miss Florence Bostwick, one of the most popular of the 
debutantes, was with Miss Olive Watt. Mrs. George New- 
hall and Mrs. Walter Filer; Mrs. Julian Thorne and Mrs. 
Andrew Welch were prominent society folks at the St. Fran- 
cis lunching on Monday. 

Mesdames Frank Lynch, George Ebright, Archibald 
Johnson and Russell Slade were together. Mrs. Gerald 
Herrmann, one of the prominent Junior League members, 
and Mrs. H. Bliss Rucker were notably attractive at the 
Monday gathering of the smart set. 

* * * 

Mrs. Christopher Holmes and her mother Mrs. William 
D. Peck of Santa Barbara, have taken a beautiful apartment 
at the Fairmont Hotel. 




LOU W. SARTOR, Prop 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTORS SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION- 
'S! and Franklin Streets San Francisco, Cul 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
11AVK lOUR CARS WASHED AXD GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Kali's: 35o per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Flours for Service and Storage of Automobile* 



Graystone 130 

SHERWOOD 



Open Day ai>'l Night 

GARAGE 



Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specially 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



News From Santa Cruz 

Work started last week on the remodeling of the upper 
nine of the Santa Cruz Golf and Country Club course, wide- 
ly known as one of the sportiest eighteen hole links on 
the coast. 

The changes being made will do away with the parallel 
fairways which have been the cause of some annoyance 
in the past. With several new greens and the entire course 
under water Santa Cruz will have a course which can com- 
pare favorably with the best in the state. 



Around the Corner 
Around the corner I had a friend. 
In this great City that has no end ; 
Yet days go by and weeks roll on, 
And before I know it a year has gone, 
And I never see my old friend's face, 
For life is a swift and terrible race. 
He knows I like him just as well 
As in the days when I rang his bell 
And he rang mine. \Ye were younger then, 
And now we are busy, old, tired men — 
Tired of playing a foolish game 
Tired of trying to make a name. 
"Tomorrow," I say, "I will call on Jim, 
Just to show that I'm thinking of him." 
But tomorrow comes — and tomorrow goes, 
And the distance between us grows and grows. 
Around the corner, yet miles away. 
"Here's a telegram. Sir" ; Jim died today. 
And that's what we all deserve — in the end 
Anmnd the corner, a vanished friend. 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 

Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 

Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing, Oiling, Greasing, Washing and Polishing 
Gasoline : Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




I 111.. GRAYSTONE 4200 

Metal Work Apper- 
talnlng to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Blnck- 
snilthlng. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



"CUT THIS OUT" 



This Coupon entitles Mr _ _ _ 

to FREE Inspection and Minor 
Adjustments of Hydraulic Four Wheal 
Brakes. 

WAGNER ELECTRIC CORPORATION 
457 Ninth Street Telephone Market 1188 San Francisco 



January 15, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
National Automobile Club 

TR.W EL in California, particularly 
motor travel, offers so diversified a 
series of attractions that the motorist 
may enjoy a round of entertainment 
which will not only provide pleasant 
scenes and pleasant hours, hut also 
provide an unconscious means of edu- 
cation, stimulative as well as instruc- 
tive, and leading to an appreciation ol 
Nature, which may he secured in no 
other way. 

Through the Redwood aisles of the 
northern coast there runs a pleasant 
tighway and the changing scenes that 
feveal panoramas of colorful valleys, 
winding streams and foaming breakers, 
offer one phase of California's scenic 
cnjovuicnt. 

The Pacific Highway that passes 
through the northern end of the Sacra- 
mento Valley following the broad Sac 
ratnento to its headwaters in the 
eternal snows of Shasta supplies an- 
other interesting excursion through 
realms of beauty comparable to no 
other district in the world. Vlong this 
paved highway lies the volcanic cone 
hi I assen and the marvelous back 
Country which forms the Lassen Vol- 
canic National Park. Here an 
Caves, spouting geysers and boiling 
lakes, multi-colored mud pots, crystal- 
fine lakes, plunging cataracts and boil- 
Sng streams, that, with their continual 

rnovement, breathe the very harmom 

ia dd Nature itself. 

To the north lie the strange sculptur- 
ings in the midst ^<i which was fought 
one of the fiercest Indian Wars in Vm 
erica, fust before the highway reaches 
the t hegon line, looms the white tl 
l\ of Shasta, sentinel of the northern 



border of the Stair, whose hooded 
might was made tin -setting of Indian 
legend and myth of tin- aboriginal in- 
habitants who came from the Klamath 
and the Rogue and the forests of Trin- 
ity. Under the shadow of this mighty 
peak will be found the northern bound- 
ary of the Alother Lode about which 
was interwoven in the early days of 
American occupation of California 
much of the romance of the treasure 
seekers, the stories of the ox-train ami 
mule team, trials and privations of the 
pioneers in crossing the ice-bound 
passes of the High Sierra and the wild 
period that kept no middle course but 
alternated between the enthusiasm of 
rich finds and the gloom of despair. 

Third phase of California's multi- 
farious history lies along El Camino 
Real, the highway over which came the 
first civilized hands into Alta California 
and over which toiled the padres and 
caballeros founding the chain of sanc- 
tuaries which became the centers of 
Spanish life in the new world. About 
these monuments there still clings the 
atmosphere of medievalism in their 
massive battlements and buttressed 
walls, built not only to resist the ele- 
ments hut as a means of defense against 
the marauding hands of Indians; their 
very architecture tells a story of hard- 
ship and consecration, a tale of the life 
that is practical and hard and unyield- 
ing, woven with the spiritual sugges- 
tion of shrine and chancel and cloistered 
halls. 



Big year ahead 

During 1927 we will 
carry the heaviest demand 
for service in our history, 
and with an efficiency never 
before equaled. Our aim is 
to keep dependable service 
available in advance of the 
needs of the territory 
served. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



RADIO 
(Continued from Page 1 1 1 
legislation must he passed at the next 
session of Congress in December, and 
they should combine to vote against 
members of Congress who do not work 
ti ' this end. 

About sixty per cent of the present 
broadcasting stations should he regu- 
lated off the air. They serve no useful 
purpose. Some of them are merely 
trying to establish "air rights" for the 
purpose of selling such rights later on. 
Tlic\ onlj serve to interfere with re- 
ception from stations which .ire giving 
high-class, artistic programs at great 
CI ISt, 

While no broadcasting station has 
as yet established any legal property 
rights, or "air rights." the stations 
which have been giving good service to 
the listener should be protected and 
should he given rights surHcent to en- 
courage them to continue to spend 
sums of money for good equip- 
ment and good programs. 

With Congress preparing to convene 
next month, it is n< d time for 

radio listeners to write to their repre- 
sentatives and sei: itors and demand 
that something In lone at once to ef- 
fect Federal conti ' of broadcast! _ 



p.Q.and 




"PACIFIC SEBVICE" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




Companion of 

lje morning • • 

it^refreshmcp • 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 enpt were m-ned at Ike 

Panama-Pacific Intr-rnni l«nnl Exposltlaa 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, V>27 



JvlPcJ 



-&J&Z&* 



"&M 



] J*> 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



" , 3Vy 



iMCe/V* 



"9a 



L»- 




Thomas McHugh, 

Patron of Golf at Lincoln 

Park Municipal Links. 



BY the sudden passing of Tom McHugh, golfers from all 
parts of the world have lost one of their best friends, as 
genial Tom had been superintendent of the Municipal links 
at Lincoln Park since its inception in 1910. Tom McHugh 
has served the Park Commission faithfully for over 35 
years, and was one of Superintendent John McLaren's most 
trusted servants. 

In all that time, Tom was always on the job with a pleas- 
ant smile for everyone. He started as a teamster in Golden 
Gate Park and held the honor of possessing the city's best 
groomed team of horses, an honor held for over ten years. 

Then when a golf course was proposed at Lincoln Park, 
which at that time was the Italian Cemetery, naturally 
John McLaren chose Tom McHugh to take charge and co- 
operate with Ed Braniten, Godfrey Eacret, Judge Lindsey. 
Vincent Whitney, and Bill Bradley. 

These seven men were greatly responsible for what we 
have today at Lincoln Park, one of the best municipal links 
in the world. * * * 

Whitney-Bradley Were the Architects 

Vincent Whitney, one of the best amateur golfers in the 
state, and Bill Bradley, the peer among the professional 
ranks, were elected by the other members of the committee 
to lay out an eighteen-hole course. 

Tom McHugh, in those days, didn't profess to know much 
about golf, but he accompanied Vincent Whitney and Brad- 
ley every step over their tour of the landscape. 

After these three celebrities had worked out a plan to 
build the first Municipal course the city ever owned, the 
next thing was to find out how it could be successfully fin- 
anced. Money was rather tight in those days for such a 
project, because golf was considered a rich man's game, and 
it had no place among the rank and file. 

Never-the-less, Godfrey Eacret and Ed Bransten raised 
enough money from among their friends to build three 
holes; then six; later nine; and eventuallv eighteen. 

Whenever Eacret ran short of funds he would call on his 
S 1 friend Judge Lindsey. then a director on the Park- 
Board, and to get rid of Godfrey, the Judge always came 



through. Possibly Judge Lindsey was the largest contribu- 
tor to the building of the Lincoln Park Links. 
* * * 

McHugh Great Admirer of Boys 

lorn McHugh anil Bob Lager, who have both gone to the 
great beyond, were greatly responsible for the development 
of some of the greatest golfers who have ever risen in the 
State. 

Tom, like Bob. was a great admirer of the boys, and it was 
through Tom's lovable nature, and Lager's skill as a golf 
instructor, that such boys as Sam L. Conlan, John J. .Mc- 
llugh. Francis Murphy, Wilbur and Claude Edwards and 
the two Ritchie brothers, George and James, owe their rise 
to fame as California's greatest golfers. Tom had a kind 
word for everyone, and his name was known from Coastj 
ti '-< 'oast. 

Every youngster, who happened to want to learn to play 
golf was a friend of Tom's. He encouraged them in evcry 
way and took them into his care as if they were members of 
his own family. Tom comes of the real old Irish stock and 
was very proud of bis six children, all of whom are out in the 
business world and doing well. 

It would be safer to say that there is no one connected 
with golf today that is more popular than was Tom Mc- 
Hugh. Tom has met many celebrities from all over the 
world, when they happened in on Lincoln Park to play ovel 
what is considered one of the most beautiful and ideally 
located golf courses in the world, all the handiwork of dear 
old Tom. himself, and a lasting memory to his name. 

What John McLaren, superintendent of Golden Gate 
Park, has done for the city in gracing it with the greatest 
park in the world — Golden Gate Park. — so our good friend 
Tom McHugh. in a smaller measure, is responsible for giv- 
ing the city a golf course that has no equal anywhere. 

Sam Conlan remarked to the writer only last New Year's 
I lay. that he had played on every course of note in the coun- 
try and claimed that the greens at Lincoln Park had the 
best recuperating qualities of any greens he had ever 
played on. * * * 

Over 250,000 Play Each Year 

Considering that over 250,000 patrons play over the Lin- 
coln I 'ark links each year, it is a truly remarkable fact that 
the course and greens were kept in better condition than 
most of the privately owned courses, thanks to the watch- 
ful eye of dear old Tom, who was always on the job from 
the break of day to the setting of the sun. His whole heart 
and soul were in his work. Tom had watched the course 
grow up from the Italian cemetery to one of the garden spots 
of the West overlooking the Pacific Ocean. He was as 
much a part of Lincoln Park as are the beautiful fairways! 
greens, and stately trees so well groomed. He knew everv 
Made of grass as he traversed the course once or twice each 
day and prided himself on the superintendence of the finest 
municipal golf course on earth. 

Tom may have passed on to the great beyond, but he has 
left the city with a monument that will never be defaced, 
a splendid tribute to his name, for it has been remarked 
by the thousands of visitors and citizens alike that now here 
on the globe was there a better or more perfectly kept golf 
course than the Municipal Links at Lincoln Park. 

The name of McHugh was nationally known among the 
golfers of America. Tom Jr. is professional at the < igden 
Country Club, and is an uncle to Johnny McHugh, a formes 
State and Northern California champion. 



fanuary 15, 1927 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 

Orpheum 

Maud Allan, former San Francisco girl, noted dancer will 
lie the headliner at the ( Irpheum this week, starting Satur- 
fa\ . where the famous dancer of international renown will 
ftpear in a number of new features including her program 
oi "Dance Poems." 

Miss Allan recently danced in the Hollywood Bowl with 
Alfred Hertz leading the orchestra. Her success was phe- 
nominal. During her Orpheum engagement she will be as- 
Ested by Altschule as conductor of the orchestra. 

Jack Norworth, who appears with pretty Dorothy Adel- 
phi, his wife, in a comedy, "The Nagger" is also a headliner. 
■orworth is one of Broadway's popular singers and his ap- 
pearance on this coast is being greeted with enthusiasm. 

Galla-Rini and his sister will appear in "What Next" 
staged by H. C. Stimmel, and offering a melange of music ; 
Anna Braile and Andre Pallo, dance artists assisted by the 
Jugo-Slav Royal Orchestra; "Any Family," a comedy by 
Harry Delf presented by an excellent cast; Joe Darcey, 
American blackface songster; Marie Stoddard in "Enter- 
taining the Prince" are other program numbers on the ( ir- 
pheum bill for the coming week. 

* * * 
Golden Gate 

Rae Samuels, international song star, known both in Eu- 
rope and America as the Blue Streak of Vaudeville, will 
appear at the Golden Gate theater, the "Junior Orpheum," 
His coming week beginning with Saturday, as the featured 
star on the Centennial Year bill of vaudeville and photoplay 
attractions. With her peppy mannerisms and her win- 
ning personality, Miss Samuels is always a great favorite 
with theater-fans. 

< Idiva, known as "the water queen." and her human seals 
will be the second feature of the new bill, Working in a 
large glass tank Odiva performs a series of daring stunts 
Under water and her seals work both on the stage and m the 
tank. 

"Corporal Kate" will he the screen attraction, being 

■OWtl fur the lirst time in this city with Vera Reynolds. 
Julia have and Kenneth Thompson as the trio of stars. 
The picture is one of love and adventure. 

Jack Norton, well known vaudeville comic, brings a com- 
pany, including several young gnls in a clever comedy act. 
Claude Sweeten and his splendid orchestra give musical pro- 
grams of excellent worth. 

* * * 
California 

"Bertha, the Sewing Machine Girl," with Madge Bellarm 
the heroine of the Story, occupies the screen tin- coming 
week at the California theater commencing with Saturday's 
engagement. This picture was made from Theodore Isre 
Bier's famous old stai^e play. 

The popular Sherwoods have arranged a new concert 
program introducing some of the latest songs. Short films, 
Comedy reels and news items are also screened at the Cali- 
fornia. 

* * * 

Capitol 

The Capitol theater will this week present a novel enter- 
tainment opening on Sunday with an operetta. "The Prince 
of Hawaii." in which natives of the islands appear in their 
songs and dances. 

A clioius of 30 hula hula dancers and a native orchestra 
in addition to numerous principals make up the cast. 
intinued on Page 22) 



At the Elder Gallery 
Professor Eugen Neuhaus, of the University of Califor- 
nia delivered two lectures on Thursday afternoon at 3:30 
o'clock, in the Paul Elder Gallery, on "The Ideals of Ameri- 
can Art," as represented in the Loan Exhibition at the 
Palace of the Legion of Honor. The lirst lecture was 
delivered January 13th. Professor Neuhaus discussed 
"The Followers of the Great Traditions" — The Classicists. 
The Academicians, The Romanticists, The Barizon Follow- 
ers, etc. The following week, January 20th, he will take up 
The Modernists, The Impressionists, The Realists, etc. 

# * * 

Kathleen Byam will give a program of four monologues, 
under the sponsorship of Eva Smith Hackett, in the Paul 
Elder Gallery, Saturday afternoon, January 15th, at 2:30 
o'clock. Miss Byam, who has had considerable professional 
experience on the stage, has selected numbers under the 
general title of "Types of Women" that offer character de- 
lineations illustrating the modern dramatic treatment in 
contrast to the sentimental heroine of the Victorian age. 



An exhibition of Wood-block prints by Franz Marc, one 
of the great German modernists, are being shown in the Paul 
Elder Gallery for two weeks, from Monday. January 
10th. Marc was one of the founders of "The Blue Knights" 
in Munich, in 1911. His pictures are extreme in conception 
and execution. This exhibition has been arranged through 
the co-operation of Mme. E. E. Scheyer, who secured the 
rare prints through her friendship with Franz Marc's 
widow. 



Public Invited to Join Story Writing Classes This Month 

The U. C. Extension is announcing evening classes in short 
story writing, news writing and feature stories, beginning- 
January 4th and 5th at the Pacific building, Fourth and 
Market street, San Francisco. 

The classes are open to the public and the work is intended 
for beginners as well as advanced students. 

The classes in news writing and feature story writing be- 
gan at 7 and 8 o'clock the evening of Tuesday. January 4th, 
at 2<>3 Pacific building. These classes offer the opportunity 
of becoming a newspaper writer and writer of illustrated 
stories of fact, travel and other feature stories for news- 
papers and magazines. 

Short story writing for beginners and advanced students 
opened Wednesday evening. January 5th, at 7 and 8 o'clock 
at 342 Pacific building. These classes include practical instruc- 
tion and practice in writing fiction for the magazines. 

Gilbert G. Weigle, who conducts the classes, has con- 
ducted similar classes for U. C. Extension for the past eight 
vears. Scores of former students are today working news- 
paper writers, feature story writers, and writers of short stories 
in the current fiction magazines. 

Registrations are being made at extension headquarters, 140 
Kearny street, phone Kearny 100. Intending students are in- 
vited to visit at the opening session of all classes. The in- 
structor offers the cheering encouragement that his experience 
as a writer and instructor hears out his assertion that writers 
are "made, not born." "The myth has heen exploded that writ- 
ire horn, not made." he says. 

Registrations will be kept open until class limits are reached. 



We have been serving Peninsula Patrons, 
too, for generations. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth ?t.. ?vn Kbimm a 



'Phone M\RkKT<»16 t 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 15, 1923 




PIONEER 



The 
Name 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 

Hi'rj^.im.iCTror ^°u n s e aUi o e S show 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES: 

San Francisco — Burlingame 

West 7»3 478 



Phone Surra* 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKHAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 
San Mateo Counties 



875 FOLSOM ST. 



Palo alto Offi 
818 EMERSON ST. 
Phone ; 
Palo alto 315-j 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 21 I 
Granada 

"It" the Elinor Glyn photoplay, will 
be the screen feature, this coming week, 
beginning Saturday, at the Granada 
theater, with alluring Clara Bow, dem- 
onstrating what the author of "Three 
Weeks" means by "It." 

In speaking of "It," Elinor Glyn has 
stated that Douglas Fairbanks has "It." 
also the Prince of Wales and the cine- 
ma celebrity, John Barrymore, is ac- 
credited by the author as having this 
particular quality. Whatever it is. we 
shall find out at the ( iranada where one 
of Elinor Glyn's elaborate pictures will 
be shown, after the usual manner of 
Granada presentations. 

Eddie Peabody, whom everybody ad- 
mires, is still at the (iranada, "thank 
you" and will give another of his su- 
perior musical programs. Frankly I 
admit that this clean-cut young mu- 
sician, with his clean-cut ideas and 
musical ability has a dominating place 
in my estimation of orchestra leaders 
and the kind of musical programs one 
thoroughly enjoys — and likes to re- 
member. So go to the Granada, to 
hear Eddie Peabody, first of all. and 
then besides, this week especially, you 
will see an excellent screen and stage- 
program. 

* # * 

Alcazar 

"The Home Towners" now on its 
fifth week at the Alcazar theater, ( )'- 
Farrell street between Powell and Ma- 
son -treets, is too good to miss. Visitors 
to San Francisco are reminded that an 
excellent play written by the inimitable 
George M. Cohan, can give them one 
of the heartiest laughs they have had. 
in years. 

Sparkling, true-to-life, filled to the 
brim with familiar small-town senti- 
ments, ihi - swiftly moving farce-com- 
edy has a punch and an urge seldom 
surpassed. 

Thomas Chatterton as the success- 
ful Xew Yorker who greets his home- 
town folks with enthusiasm only to 
find himself in a peck of trouble ap- 
pears in one of his most convincing and 
splendid roles. Edward Cassidy, his 
Friend, dominates the play with the 
skill for which he is known. Helen 
Keers takes the part of his wife and 
wins a host of new friends in her char- 
acter part. Muriel ( liven is certainly 
clever, sweet and appealing; Phil Tead, 
Thomas Mills, Dorothy LaMar, Grant 
Cordon, Charles Edler, Marie Sorrille. 
Stanley Ruhland and Henry Caubisens 
are in the cast. 



Quite Springlike 
The Queen, wearing a bouquet of 
sweet peas, was drest for the weather 
which greeted her. — St. Paul Dispatch. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

OBIce and Works 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 71113 
Branch Ofllcec 760 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bide.) 
Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

If lirre Good Tailoring 
Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal, 
Spurt and Business wear is now 
ready for your early considera- 
tion. 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
opi>. olympic club 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfleld 3852 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^ 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's MosI Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, SI.00 35c, 50c, 75c S1.00.SI.50 . la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

HATTD3 MoOSEil MtNUIE C. MoOSBB 



cXeanorS 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 




ICE CREAMS 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 



ITALIAN CUISINE 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms, Cl«an Linen, Clean Everything 

Ratoi Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



CALilUlN It V 1L.L./Y CARL st^fFEN; PROP 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hour* 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

lne rC room!! ' f A"," •!". ii ' S* '2 8 "■ . m " <» la c » rte >- Private din- 
Ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating; 76 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



OT.it.1I and 
Larkin Sti. 



We.kdaji, lanchnon .... 

(11 JO to I P. m.j 
Dtanw, W«tk D»r* «nd Sand.rt.. 



BLANCO'S 



Phono 
Crayilone 8100 



4 .75 

_ 1.S0 



No Visitor Should Leavo the City With. 

out Dining in the Finest Cafe 

in America 



Our Main Dining Room u open again on Sundays. 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

9S Third Avenue. SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p m 
6:S0 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 





Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

OPEN 8:00 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M. 




Sasaki _ ' ' ^""""""ssjflaaaai a. i nsw- 1 


14-Milk B-DII 


unsurpassed cuisine 
Carl Leonhardt 

Fermerty of Golden Gets Part C.iino 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Street— Garfield 844 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Buildinc, Powell and Market Sts., San Francuoo 

Phone Garfield 5394 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day Is 
taking very good care of them, Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth sore? Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please yon. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfleld 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions: Crowns: Self Cleaning; Bridges: 

Porcelain Work and Rootles* Plates 



"I 



S,#L TO NEW YORK j 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and ( 



GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropics 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
leven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and historic ports — Man- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Libertad, Salvador; Corinto, 
Nicaragua. Two day6 in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swimming tank. The Panama Mail is 
world-famous for its food and service. 



Costs Less Than $9 a Day 



than $9 a day for 
meals on steamer. Co East by Panama 
as little as £350. (This price does not 
Mail liners leave Sa 



i first-class passage, including bed and 
Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
iclude berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
>■ York approximately every 21 days. NeXl 



sailings from San Francisco : SS ECUADOR. January 22; SS COLOMBIA, F.-I.rujrv 
19. From Los Angeles two davs later. Wc,h*ard from New York: S> COLOMBIA, 
January 15; SS VENEZUELA, February 5. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 




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Direct Branches: 

San Francisco Los Angeles 

461 Post St. 3136 Wilshire Blvd. 




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Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
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Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 

Phone Market 117 San Francisco, Calif. 



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Announcing the 

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Made in San Francisco by the 
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Scientifically designed to give the maximum of mileage combined with 
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Established July 20, 1856 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

he San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

r., from 1SS4 to 1S25. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

elephone Kearny $357. Entered at ,San Francisco, California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



cix 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., JANUARY 22, 1927 



No. 4 



Skull and Cross-bones for Government Alcohol 



By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



UNCLE SAM has masqueraded in many garbs; for a 
while, in modern times, during the recent war hysteria, 
vhen all Europe was calling upon him for help, he un- 
Blingly, — perhaps — was expected to live up to the role 
if a generous Santa Clans for the whole world; (personal- 
9 1 thought he resembled that strong-stomached, vacuous- 
Red animal which grazes preferably upon hills) ; then, the 
mod of the mob changing suddenly and inexplicably, he 
\as dubbed a "Shylock" by the very nations upon which 
ie had showered his shekels when the monstrous "Frank- 
nstein" "made in Germany" threatened to mow down Civ- 
lization itself; now he is up before the tribunal of the people 
.s a murderer! 

This appellation is not thrust in Cnclc Sam'- lace by an 
Kuriated army of "reds"; it is the conclusion which 
Kges and journalists, conservatives ami elected repre- 
sentatives of the United State- have come to. after reading 
he statistics regarding deaths caused by poison liquor, 

The year 1926 claimed a toll f 2,903 deaths in eighteen states 
f the Union, and these figures are necessaril) incomplete. In 
\'cu York City alone, the deaths from alcohol totaled 7?0 
ast year, or twice as many deaths as in the whole ol "wet 
'aigiand and Wales, with a population of 38,000,000; and 
our times as main in wet Australia, which has a population 
diout equal to that of New York City. 

In the lace of these facts, the drys contend fatuously, 
li.it if "a citizen goes ahead and drink- it. he is in the same 
'oMlion as a man who walk- into tile drug-tore and buys 
i bottle of carbolic acid, carrying a poison label, and drinks 

n their zeal to repudiate the plain and un\ truth 

hat Prohibition is not only a farce, but a criminal far 
hat. the dr\ - ignore tin fact that w hen the citizen purcl 
i portion of alcohol, either plain or contained in liquor of 
iOmc sort, there is no label on the bottle to warn him that 
vli.ii he is going to imbibe is rank poison; no skull and 
joss-bones to startle him from his purpose! 

< In the day before the New Year wa- issued in. when 
he whole countn wa- appalled b\ the deaths which had 
aken place during the Christmas holidays from drinking. 
,n\ Mellon, in response to protests made b\ various 
i --men. stated that he did not consider it "the dut\ •'< 
In i iovernment to poison people to enforce the law Later 
n. however, it was explained that the use of wood .-.' 
is a denatnrant "would be continued until the government 
lienn-i- discovered some non-poisonous but equ 
ive substance to take it- place." 



As a clergyman of Brooklyn, New York, says, in de- 
nouncing the poisoning of alcohol by the Federal Govern- 
ment : 

"It is more like seventeenth-century Russia than twenti- 
eth-century America, the proposal to put our erring fellow 
citizens to death in the same way in which you would get 
rid of rats, (iovernment rum-poisoning- is inflicting the 
death penalty without giving the culprit a hearing. It is 
giving the opponents of Prohibition a decided advantage 
with the masses of the people." 

Various Senator- have called this practice "fiendish ;" "le- 
galized murder;" that "every death caused by poison alco- 
hol is murder on the part of some neglectful or corrupt of- 
ficial :" "morally, if not legally, the United State.- (iovern- 
ment stands charged with responsibility for the death of 
scores who died from drinking government-poisoned liquor 
during the holidays." 

L'ncle Sam has. in truth, "out-t iermanied Germany." 
To quote from the .Yew York Evening World: 
It is the Anti-Saloon League, speaking in the name of 
evangelical churches, which is demanding enforcement by 
to poison. How horrified these good men were, when 
the Germans first used poison gas! How they cried out, 
when, after due warning against trawl on the high -eas. the 
Germans sank passenger -hip-! How we all shouted about 
the German frightfulness ! Ami here we are today, com- 
placently and even with a somewhat sardonic joy. using a 
weapon which by the common consent of civilized men. is 
fit only for savages. What is happening to the conscience 
ol the Christian churches of America that they permit such 
. - in be done in their name?" 

Fanatics are always cruel; fundamentally, their belief 

i:- that the end justifies the means; and they have used, in 

the past, just such devilish methods as they are using now. 

ing about what they desire in the end. Religion- wars 

have always been the most brutal, for fanatics, primarily, 

are possessed of an emotionalism that is deaf, dumb and 

i all reason, all logic. They can see only thi 

rds which they are working, and nothing i- too fiendish 

to u-e in their efforts to reach that goal. 

!- the usually shrewd, kindly, keen-witted i 
Uncle Sam changing- Is it taking on, through the pres- 
sure brought to bear by numbers of fri ' fan- 
5, the diabolical expression of a man ut to kill? 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, \' : )27 




The new year opens with one of those in- 
A Critical Time ternational complications which may lead 
to anything and at present the nation is 
tetering on the edge of trouble. We have had one exper- 
ience with the disturbance of peace, which transcended in 
scope ultimately the wildest apprehensions of the most 
gifted observers. In the same way, the apparently small 
matter of Nicaragua may hide a most appalling amount of 
trouble. 

We do not here go into the matters under dispute. We 
merely wish to call the attention of our fellow citizens to 
their duty in the premises. The government should be 
supported to the limit of our capacity and with earnestness 
and resolution. We have a good government and a cabinet 
which contains men who would not lightly plunge us into 
war. 

In these times, it is well that we have a President who 
has not shown any signs of impatience or doctrinaireism. 
He has been conspicuously reticent and very conservative. 
Rash moves of any sort are quite incompatible with his 
character. When he takes the resolute stand which he has 
shown in the Nicaragua matter, we may rest assured that 
there is ample ground for his position and that the time has 
come when this country has to declare its position in no 
faltering tones. 

Like the rest of our fellow citizens of prudence and good 
will, we have no desire to see military operations set on 
foot against any of the Latin American countries with whom 
we have always desired to live on terms of self respecting 
amity. This desire for peace can only be broken when the 
interests of this country are at stake. 

When the government says that these interests are threat- 
ened, the government may be safely believed and deserves 
our support. 



There is a very distinct purpose, on 
Criminal Procedure the part of the new Legislature, to 
deal with the matter of criminal 
prosecution and to endeavor to meet the criminal situation 
with measures which will deprive the criminal of many of 
the advantages which he has at present in a struggle with 
the social forces. There is no doubt that in this country, 
at all events, the growth 'of criminality is quite marked and 
that the criminal has, perhaps, gained at the expense of the 
rest of the community. But when we come to examine 
the reasons for this state of affairs we are more or less at 
sea. 

The lawyers, who are behind this movement for crim- 
inal reform, see only criminal procedure to blame. They 
think that, with the perfecting of the juridical system, the 
criminal will cease to flourish and righteousness will 
abound. This is the mistake of all specialists and profes- 
sionals, theological and otherwise. Human nature has a 
most uncomfortable fashion of setting the wisdom of the 
wise aside and playing havoc with the conclusions of the 
prudent. 

There is something else involved than procedure. There 
is some lack in our national education and in the way in 
which we approach the problem of adolescence, f )ur very 
cherished educational maxims are brought to naught in 
the most dramatic fashion. 

Perhaps there is nowhere in the world where the cult 
of patriotism is so marked as in this country. The patriots 



are so strong that everv little child must salute the Flag] 
and repeat a formula. That should ensure patriotism, says! 
the pedagogical savant. But does it? On the contrary, 
this is almost certainly the only country in the world where 
governmental mails must be protected by soldiers and 
money cannot be moved from one bank to another except 
in a bomb proof carriage guarded by armed men. 



fudge Ben B. Lindsey has won a na- 
Domestic Relations tional reputation, as a man of great 
bravery, who has tackled the prob- 
lems of domestic relations with an individual spirit which 
has gained for him much respect at home and abroad. 

He is now grappling with a problem which may be too 
much for him and which will either re-establish his fame 
or bring upon him an amount of violent criticism which 
may overwhelm him. He is placing the whole of the mar- 
riage relation in the arena as a disputed and disputable 
subject. It remains to be seen whether the community will 
endure that a matter so sacred as conjugal relations have 
been hitherto held to be, should become a subject of cold 
reasoning and cold blooded analysis. There are things 
so tine and so bound up with the life and spirit of social man 
that one cannot afford to challenge them. There is more 
lost than gained in the actual fact of the challenge. 

When Judge Lindsey says, therefore, that the com edi- 
tions of chastity and continence are not sound conventions 
and that they are violated time and time again in the soda 
relations of our time, there is no doubt of the correctness of 
the analysis and that the truth is in it. But the marriage 
relation and the implications which flow from it are so over- 
whelmingly more important than the violations of it, that 
it is doubtful whether anything is gained by stressing the 
violations. 

The fact is that Judge Lindsey. like many other patho- 
logical students, has become victim to the error that dis- 
ease is all prevalent, because he sees nothing but cases 
of disease. He is wrong just there. After all, health is 
more common than disease, even in sex relations. 



We are to have a new federal 
The New Federal Building building, of which we are 

greatly in need, for the old Post 
Office Building has long ago ceased to be effective as a 
federal headquarters and federal offices are scattered all 
over town, to the great loss of time and patience of tho9 
who have much and varied business to transact. 

There is a question as to the best place to erect such a 
building. It is one of the peculiarities of our public life 
that the mere erection of a federal building should be an 
opportunity for the bandying of accusations and the mak- 
ing ol offensive charges, which no other political activitv 
seems to arouse; at least, on such a scale. 

In this particular case, the Chamber of Commerce has 
quite recently gone on record against having the federal 
building in the Civic Center. Formerly, the Chamber of 
< ommerce had recommended the Civic Center as the most 
appropriate place. We are inclined to agree with the more 
recent attitude. The Civic Center is not the best place for 
such a building. It should be placed in a site of its own 
not too far from the Civic Center, for the tendency of the 
movement of the city in that direction makes it an advisable 
site for such a building. 

But we are inclined against the Civic Center on other 
and more esthetic grounds. ( >ur Civic Center is a verv 
beautiful place, and when all the plans connected with it 
are completed, will be one of the most beautiful sites in the 
world. But the exigencies of the artistic plan require the 
carrying out of building designs on a given pattern. The 
addition of the federal building to the buildings already con- 
structed and in process of construction, such as the War 



Inuary 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRAN! [SCO NEWS LETTER 



Memorial Building', would make for too much sameness. 

Let us have a new federal building on its own site, with a 
distinctive design. 



Governments are proverbially 
Ford and the Government peculiar things. The product 

of human activity destined for 
human use, they yet appear to be without any of the moral 
traits which belong to human beings and which are, in or- 
dinarv life, necessary for the well-being" of humanity. Gov- 
ernments are not honest; they are not generous; they are 
not reliable. Yet governments persist, in a sort of Nietz- 
sjhean land where they are beyond "good and evil." 

For example, the federal government made a settlement 
with the Ford Company for the income tax of 1919, which 
the shareholders regarded and were led to believe was a 
final and satisfactory settlement. Now the Government 
lias brought suit against the Ford Company to collect an 
additional $30,000,000. Business men, everywhere, are in- 
terested in this case and wish to know how it happens that 
government officers having once made a satisfactory settle- 
nent, can reopen the case and put the citizen to the trouble 
uid expense of a suit. 

But the suit of the Government has opened the eyes of 
:he nation to the performance of the Ford Company dur- 
ng the comparatively short period of sixteen years. In 
:hat time the Company which started with a cash capital 
if $28,000 has made that capital grow into a surplus of 
?200,000,000. 

This is apparently an impossible and actually incredible 
ichicvement. All the same, il was done: and history can 
/ainly be sought to find a parallel. It was clone also with- 
in the intervention of the financial centers of the country 
n the supply of capital. The Ford Company not only built 
i]! its business, but it financed itself. 

To analyse and find out how this was done may be in- 
vesting but wdl not help the investigator much. It was 

ne as most very great things arc done, by a man of genius 
n his chosen work. 




The opening of the Dumbarton Bridge 
Expansion Begins on Saturday last was a nutter oi the 
first magnitude in the history of our 
:ity. As one writer puts it the first of San Francisco's fet- 
ers is shattered by this new approach to tin- city. The 
Bening of the bridge will enable traffic, which originates 
I the San Joaquin Valley, destined for San Francisco, to 
ind a shorter n mte. 

The traffic winch originates in the Sacramento and San 
oaipiin valley and which come- West b) wa\ of Tracy and 
he Altamont pass, ran cross the bay without having to 
nake the journey round by \\a\ of Oakland. It i- also 
feted that motorists will find a diminution of seven miles 
m the valley highway as compared with the ferry route, to 
;a_\ nothing of the sa\ing of tune at the Ferry. The route 
s hi go hv the highway from Menlo Park to Livermore. 

For the pleasure motorists on Sunday, the new waj ren- 
in's Niles Canyon more accessible and the crowds and de- 
av of the ferries are avoided. This delay and congestion 
las been one reason for apparent neglect by local motor- 
sts ,,f one of the most charming and picturesque districts 
Vtthin easy reach of San Francisco. 

It is claimed that there will he a shortening of nearly 
wo hours for motor vehicles coming to this city from 
ftockton, Modest.- and Fresno. 

But, with this matter settled, we are by no means out 
I the woods and much vet remains to be done in order to 
nake our city as accessible as its importance and the de- 
elopmeut of its growth require. The experts point to the 
act that the completion of the Bayshore Highway is a mat- 
er ^i first-class importance and should be undertaken 
orthw ith. 



Judicial Prerogative 

McGuinness had been posted to* keep guard over the en- 
trance to a road which led to an old and unsafe bridge. 
Presently a car came along and he held up his hand. 

"What's the matter?" growled the driver. 

At that moment McGuinness recognized him as the 
county magistrate. 

"Oh, it's yerself, Yer Honor," he said genially. 

"Yes. it is!" was the snappy answer. 

" 'Tis all right then." said Mac, as he stept politely out 
of the way. "I got orders to let no traffic through because 
of the rotten bridge, but seein' it's you, Yer Honor, 'tis a 
pleasure — go right ahead, sir!" — American Legion Weekly. 

~M * * 

Shooting Skyward 

"My, but your little brother is growing!" 
"Yes, ma'am ; he comes up to the hem of mama's skirt 
now." — Life. 

Good-By ! 

"Whatever became of that portable garage of yours?'' 
"< ih, I tied the bulldog to it the other night and a cat ran 

by him. — American Legion Weekly. 

* * * 

More Deadly Than the Male 
Women may be as able as men at automobile driving, 
but we as an expert pedestrian, always jump faster and 
farther when we find ourself in the path of a woman- 
driven car. — New York Herald Tribune. 

Feminine Version 

The obedient husband handed his wife his first pay after 
their marriage. 

'Merc's the week's roll, dear." he said. 

"Iltnpf!" she snorted, after counting the hills. "This isn't 
anything like the rolls that father used to make!" — Ameri- 
can Legion \\ eekly. 

Landed His Passengers 
Prospective Employer -"Why did you leave your last 

place ?" 
i hauffeur — "My guv'nor and his wife fell out. sir." 
Prospective Employer — "< )h, but why leave for that?" 
I hauffeur — "Well, if you must know. sir. they fell out of 

thecar." — London ( Ipinion, 

* * * 

No Remittance 
"We are dunning him, but without much effect." 
" \iv you unremitting:" 
"Yes, and so is he." — Louisville Courier. 

* * * 

In at the Death 

Mrs. Kaylor — "Was your theatre party a success?" 

"Yes, indeed. We arrived in time to see 

almost all of the last act." — Life. 

* * * 

Modern woman's fondest wish is to be weighed and 

found wanting. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

Skirt, once a common noun, has become a mere abbrevia- 
tion. — Norfolk Virginian-Pili >t. 

* * * 

Angora, the capita! of Turkey, has passed an ordinance 
51 "uncivilized noises." That won't get her anywhere 
— the civilized kind are worse. — Cleveland Plain Healer. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22. 1927 




Henry Duffy Extends 
His Theater Circuit 

WORD was flashed throughout 
California theater circles, recent- 
ly, of the extended Henry Duffy the- 
ater circuit. 

With a chain of theaters reaching 
from Seattle, Washington, to San 
Francisco. Henry Duffy is now open- 
ing more theaters in the southern part 
of California, thus making- his circuit 
coast-length, including" in the chain 
two theaters in San Francisco. 

The new playhouse in Pasadena has 
been named the "Raymond" opening 
with "Alias the Deacon." which had 
such a long run here at the President 
on McAllister street. Hugh Cameron 
was cast for the title role. 
New Stock Company 

Henry Duffy has established a stock 
company at the Capitol Theater. Long- 
Beach, where many of Duffy's old- 
time friends appear in the cast. The 
leading man is Herbert Hayes and the 
leading lady is Nancy Fair, popular 
actress of the Alcazar theater produc- 
tions. 
More Theaters 

According to a more recent report of 
authentic information, Henry Duffy is 
negotiating for another playhouse in 
Los Angeles. 

Here, indeed, is a master mind, with 
theater understanding, as well as vi- 
sion, and that definite quality which 
pronounces Success in terms of perma- 
nency and attainment. 
* * * 

Curran 

Beginning Sunday evening, January 
22, the Curran Theater will house the 
motion picture, "What Price Glory," 
the Fox production based on the cele- 
brated stage play by Laurence Stall- 
ings and Maxwell Anderson. The im- 
mortal trio consisting of Captain Flagg, 
Sergeant Quirt and Charmaine are 
played by Victor McLaglen, Edmund 
Lowe and Dolores Del Rio, respective- 
ly. ( Ithers in the cast are William V. 
Muiig, Phyllis Haver, Leslie Fenton, 
Barry Norton and Elena Jurado. 

The important role of Private Kiper 
is_ entrusted to Ted McNamara, while 
Lipinsky is played by Sammy Cohen. 
a well known comedian of the screen. 
The principals are supported by six 
thousand veterans who donned the uni- 



>LMSURESW^ND 



OBEY NO WAND BU7 PLEASURE'S 

_ Tom Noone- 




By Josephine Young 

form again to give a war-like back- 
gn .mo I b i tin- ci imedy. 

Actual production work on "What 
I 'rice Glory" required seven months, 
but for more than a year before Walsh 
called "Camera!" research workers in 
the employ of William Fox were at 
work in France and in Washington 
gathering information, plans, maps and 
photographs for making the picture the 
most human and realistic reconstruc- 
tion of the war ever produced. 

After the opening performances two 
showings will be given daily : the mat- 
inees at 2:30 o'clock and evenings at 
8:30 promptly. The seats for the week 
go on sale at the Curran box office 
Thursday morning, January 20. "What 
Price ('dory" is said to be the biggest 
screen success ever produced and it is 
being played at the Sam H. Harris 
Theater, New York, and the Garrick 
Theater. Chicago, at the stiff two dol- 
lar scale. The Curran Theater engage- 
ment will be played, however, at a low- 
er rate, the best seats at the matinee 
being priced at $1.00; and evening 
prices in proportion, that is: 50 cents; 
75 cents ; $1 .00 and $1 .50. The produc- 
tion will be identical with the eastern 
presentations, including the symphony 
orchestra. * * * 

Concludes Engagement 

In response to demand. Madame Ka- 
lich gave "The Riddle Woman" at four 
performances, Monday. Tuesday, Wed- 
nesday matinee and Wednesday eve- 
ning, and on Thursday night she gave 
"Magda," continuing in this powerful 
Sudermann drama until her concluding 
performance tonight, Saturday, 22. 
There will be a matinee this afternoon 
as well as the evening performance and 
those who have not yet had the oppor- 
tunity of seeing Madame Kalich should 
avail themselves of the rare privilege 
"l doing so, for she is a tragedienne of 
magnificent interpretations, personal 
magnetism and histrionic power. She 
concludes her engagement tonight. 
* * * 

Wilkes 

"The Cradle Snatchers," still draw- 
ing crowds to the Wilkes theater upon 
its return engagement, by popular de- 
mand, will be here for one more 
week, according to most recent an- 
nouncements. 

Helen Bolton plays the role of Susan 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 


ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell nr. PoiYell 


} 


"The Home TownerH," 
Geo. t'olinn*N Comedy- 
Farce. 


( API TIM, 
Ellis nr. Market 


{ 

L 


••Print'*' of Hawaii,** 
Native sinKers 


COLUMBIA 
70 Eddy Street 


l_ 


Coming's Jan. 31, 
••Loose Anklet** 1 


CURRAN 
Geary nr. Mason 


} 


"What Price Glory," 
Motion Pieture 


PRESIDENT 
McAllister nr. Mkt. 


} 


"The Little Spit lire." 
Henry DuIVy Comedy* 


WILKES 
Geary at Mason 


} 


"Cradle Snateherx," 
Helen Bolton 


VAUDEVILLE 



Aileen Slnnley. "\ le- 

GOLDEN GATE ) S^'g^FS! 

ii. G. Ave. A Taylor f La Rotiue, Mildred llnr- 

J tin. Comedy Sketcfl 

"The \nunrr" 



ORPHEUM 

O'Farrell «& Povrell 


} 


Irene Rlenrdo, "Whoa 
I*n t;l lace 1." M n ssive 
P rod u <' t i on. "Hello- 
Gooduyc." A JiiKurHnR 
Travesty. Jean Retlinl 


PANTAGES (NEW) 
Market at Hyde 


} 


"The MuNic Mantel-*' 


UNION SQUARE 1 
O'Farrell nr. Powell J 


Vaudeville-Pictures 


Mission nnd 22nd 


} 


Vaudeville-Pictures 


ON THE 

DOWN 


SCREEN 

TOWN 


CALIFORNIA 
Market at 4th 


} 


Slier wood k. M u *• i col 

Program**. "Blond*? or 

Brunette.** Greta 

X Issen 


CAMEO 
Market opp. 5th 


} 


"Take It From He*> M 
Snt. to Wed., -I Day* 

Reft hut Id Denny, 1 inn- 
e (ly-l)ra ni a. "F i K 

Leaves," Wed. to Sat.* 

George O'Brien, olive 

Borden 


CASINO 

Bills at Mason 


I 
1 


"1 nehnstened Woman,*' 
"The BonrinB Fnrlles.* 
Double Bill. Sat., .Inn 
--. "Kikl." Norma Tnl- 
luadpre. Sun. nnd '•Ion 


GRANADA 

Market at Jones St. 


1 

i 


"Tlie I'lieeriui Fraud** 

ReKlnalil Denny. Kddii 

Peahotly BetlirtiM 


IMPERIAL 
Market bet. etk-Tth 


} 


' ll.'inur Of IVnui :iin 

"Scarlet Letter" Kmlef 


ST. FRANCIS 
Market bet. r.i li-cui 


I 
J 


"The Kill Brother," 
Hnrold Lloyd 


WARFIELD 
Market nr. Taylor 


1 


"The Show*** John t.ll- 

liert. Renee Vdoref 

"Ml Lilly's Dresser," 

Stage Vet 



January 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



HP TOWN 



Al.ll AMIIRA 

INeivl 

Polk nnil Green 



"Fig Leaves," Sat., Jan. 
aa. "So'» imir oiii 

M ii ii." S ii ii.. W . 1' . 
Field. "Subway Sadie," 
Mini., Tiles., Wed.. Dor- 
othy Miicknill. "Gin'- 
olo." Tliurs. Fri., Ilml 
1,11 limine 



ttOl VI. 
Polk nr. ral. 



"H e r II Ik 1* I R h I." 
I.iiur.-t I, a Plante, Sat., 
Jan. 22, "Other Wo- 
men's HiiNhnnilN." Sun., 
Monte Utile and Marie 
Prevo-st. "Sparrow n," 
Mary Piekford. Moll., 
Tues., Wed. 



Martin in Louis O. Macloon's comedy, 
which has more fun to the minute than 
many-a farce we have seen here. It 
fairly sparkles with wit and action, 
featuring a trio of married women who 
endeavor to teach their "stepping- 
out" husbands a lesson in the subtle 
art of flirting. * * * 
President 

Those who have seen the handsome 
Dale Winter in her role of "The Little 
Spitfire," can readily account for the 
sustained success of this lively comedy 
Bow entering upon its sixth week at the 
Henry Duffy theater, "The President" 
on McAllister Street near Jones. 

Myron C. Fagin, author of "The 
Little Spitfire" has supplied a story 
combined with dialogue, humor and 
repartee. The duel of wits between 
Marty and his wife "licit" in the last 
act, creates continuous laughter. Earl 
Lee and Alice Cooper have these roles. 

Alice Buchanan, John O'Hara and 
Florence Roberts are being welcomed 
hack to the President, in this merry 
comedy. * * * 

Alcazar 

Another week demanded by theater 

patrons for George M. Cohan's play, 
"The Home Towners" according to 
the box office of the Alcazar. 

Bristling with fun. this Earce-comed) 
keeps up a pace of action, merriment 
and wheels within wheels that go to 
make up the plot. Thomas Chatterton 
and Edward B. Cassid) are the central 
figures about whom the comedy revol- 
ves—with flashes of undercurrent tra- 
gedies in the lives of the characters. 

The play takes a slap .11 small-town 
ideas, provincial manner of thinking 
and the measuring of all people by vil- 
lage limitations. It is a subtle mes- 
sage of what wrong can be done h\ 
those who think in little grooves and 
small alleys. 

Don't mis 



he I lomc Towners 



Capitol 

"The Prince of Hawaii," with a cast 
pf 75 native Hawaiians and a native or- 
chestra is being played at the Capitol 

theater where the spectacular operetta 
opened an engagement last week. 

Songs, dances and groups of players 
in music of the haunting island- of the 
are part :<\ the attraction-. 



Columbia 

\\ v anticipated so much with the 
announcement of the coining of the 
Mordkin dancers at the Columbia the- 
ater and we were re-paid over and over 
again. 

Rubinstein's "Souvenir of Roses" 
will be given at today's matinee with 
many of the Mordkin stars appearing 
in solo and ensemble parts. Tschai- 
kowskv's "Nightingale" is also sched- 
uled for this program with Mile. Vera 
Nemtchinova the soloist. 

"Aziade," a choreo-drama by Mik- 
hail Mordkin with a musical score es- 
pecially composed for the gorgeous 
choreographic program will be played 
for the dancers. Mordkin, later in the 
program, appears in his renowned 
"Bow and Arrow Dance" than which 
none can yet compare. 

San Franciscans have been particu- 
larly interested and enthused over the 
appearance of the beautiful Virginia 
Marvin who had a large class in danc- 
ing here and across the Bay. Miss 
Marvin is as pretty as a picture. She 
(lances with joyous grace and is one of 
the principals in many of the dances. 
In one, especially, the "Wanyka Tany- 
ka" or Russian Doll dance, Mile. Mar- 
vin is the personification of charm and 
and artistry. She was recalled both 
during the San Francisco and ( lakland 
appearance at the conclusion of each 
of her duo numbers. 

I'.e sure to see the Mordkin dancers 

it may be a long time before they 
are here again, and you will have an 
artistic feast and a vision you can re- 
member for many, many a day. 



Orpheum 

The ( Irpheitm Theater is keeping up 
its pace of offering shows of exception- 
al merit and the coming week, begin- 
ning this Saturda) afternoon, will see 
another big bill of all-new super-feat- 
ure acts including "Hello-G l-l'.vc." 

a revue in fifteen scene-, with a east ol 

players including Irene Ricardo, Frank 
Hurst. Eddie Vogt, Miss Bunny If. 

Bluch I. and.. If. 'fin- Pi t iatanos. Miss 
\la\ Meyers, Jean Bedini and the "Six 
Hello Girls," produced by lean Be- 
dini. 

Irene Ricardo is t" make her first 
appearance here in San Francisco in 
quite a while and w ill have a skit called 
"Whoa. Pagliacci." jean Bedini, one 
of the outstanding comedians and pro- 
ducers on the vaudeville stage today. 
will be assisted by Bluch Landolf and 
Nan in "A Juggling Travesty." 

( Hhers on the new program will be 
Harry Fang and Bernice Haley in a 
skit called "\\ ho Is Y,. U r Boss" : Frank 
Hurst and Eddie N aring "Be- 

fore The Bar"; The Hi Gantahos, Am- 



elia, Adam and Marta, the darlings of 
the dance, in "Yesterday, Today and 
Tomorrow"; Myra Fee, a dainty young 
miss in "A I )e Luxe Volume of Song 

* * * 

Warfield 

John Gilbert, starring in "The 
Show" a Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer pro- 
duction begins an engagement Satur- 
day on the screen at the Loew's War- 
field theater. Rene Adoree and Lionel 
Barrymore are principals and other as- 
sisting stars include: Dorothy Sebas- 
tian, Jules Cowles, Francis Powers and 
others. 

"The Show" was directed by Tod 
Browning and presents a vivid drama 
of the Budapest underworld, with much 
action laid in the sideshow of a circus, 
"The Palace of Illusion" with its 
strange freaks of Nature. 

The Warfield stage presentation will 
be Fanchon and Marco's idea, "Mi- 
lady's Boudoir" with Arline Langdon, 
Dorothy Crooker, Natalie Harrison, 
Ada Broadbent, Valerie Wade and Lu- 
cinda Beatty impersonating articles of 
the boudoir such as perfume bottles, 
powder puffs, etc. 

* * * 
Pantages 

Who does not love a circus? Every 
one who has red corpuscles! 

So those who visited Pantages this 
past week when their Indoor Circus 
was staged, saw again the fellows who 
fascinated us in our youth — the clowns, 
and Pantages had a host of them; the 
elephants — and there were Reed's 
Baby Elephants, the youngest group 
of elephants ever appearing in one act 

all under the direction of their comedy 
trainer. Adele Nelson 

1 1 'i.iiiiiui.'il nn Page 141 




NEW ORLEANS' 

To better serve cur many friends and 
patrons over '400,000.00 has been 
expended in reconstruction to 
maintain this famous hostelry as 

One of Americas Leading Hotels ; 

ACCOMMODATING 1000 GUESTS 

Lai^e rooms with unusually high 
ceilings and ^ood ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort. 

Alfred S . Aimer and Ccitd. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Sni fir JescripthT fcUfr Ticket Offices of 
llhutrdted Mardi Gnu alilrdnsportatioil 
Program for the asking fines i n lobb' 




THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 1927 






the 



Lat- 
roses, 



Brilliant Weddings 

THERE have been many brilliant weddings since 
coming of the new year and the remainder of January 
and most of February bid fair to equal, if not eclipse, the 
number of marriages within Society s realm. 

The wedding of Miss Simone fuillard and Mr. George 
Hotaling was notable a brilliant affair with its setting ot 
unusual attractions. The ceremony took place Saturday. 
Tanuary 8. in the ballroom of the Hotel San Carlos in 
Monterey, on the roof of the hotel overlooking the beautiful 
Monterey Bar. 

The lo'ng room was a replica of an Italian garden 
tice work, garlanded in huge poinsettias and white 
huo-e vases of the same shades of red and white outlined the 
aisles, from which were strung ribbon streamer- leading up 
to the arch at the end of the room, where stood the marriage 
altar. 

Bridesmaids 

Miss Virginia Sullivan, Mrs. Alfred Swmnerton. .Miss 
Dorothy Porter and Miss Brunette Giusti were the bride's 
attendants. They wore white taffeta bouffant dresses with 
red satin slipper's and carried in their arms shower bou- 
quets of red roses and lilies of the valley. 

Miss Marcelle Juillard, a slender blonde, was the maid-of- 
honor. She wore a gown of pale green and silver and car- 
ried an old-fashioned nosegay. Little Jane Swinnerton was 
the flower girl. Baltzer Peterson was best man. 

Bridal Gown 

The bride was gowned in heavy white satin embroidered 
in pearls. She wore al ong tulle veil which fell from her 
coiffure to the length of many yards, trailing in graceful 
folds. She looked the picture of loveliness. Orange blos- 
soms were worn in coronet bands across her forehead and 
pearls ornamented her gown. She was given away by her 
father, Mr. Jean Juillard. 

Elaborate Banquet 

An elaborate banquet followed the wedding ceremony, 
tables having been set for the bridal party beneath a gor- 
geously decorated alcove. A mammoth wedding cake or- 
namented the table center, while garlands of flowers and 
tumbled-over baskets and handsome receptacles held the 
rare blossoms, which were part of the picture formed about 
the wedding ceremony and its festivities. 

Many prominent society people from San Francisco, 
Piedmont and the other bay cities were among the guests 
which included distinguished Californians from Monterey 
county, the peninsula cities and many from other parts of 
the State as well as immediate members of both well-known 
California families. 

* * * 

Bon Voyage 

Mrs. Frederick C. Mills was hostess at a handsomely 
appointed bridge luncheon given at the Fairmont Hotel on 
Saturday, the event being in compliment to Mrs. Charles 
B. Piatt, who is going abroad on an extended tour and, 



By Antoinette Arnold 

also, in honor of Mrs. Edward F. Elkins 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

On the Coast Highway Halfway Between San Francisco and Lot Aniele* 

An Inn of Unuioal Excellence 

IFire or vrtta for reservation* on your next trip tmitk 



f Xew York. 

a visitor in this city. 

Pink roses and fresias were combined in the table decora- 
tions. Sixteen guests were invited to the luncheon. Cards 

were played during the afternoon. 



From Chico 

Mrs. Jerome D. Peters of Chico has 
weeks at the Fairmont Hotel. 



been spending a few- 



Sacramento Visitors 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kiesel of Sacramento spent a few 
days at the Fairmont Hotel this week, where they were 
greeted by many friends. Mr. Kiesel is a prominent banker 

of the Capitol City. 

* * * 

From Denver 

Mrs. Cora Costello of Denver is at the Fairmont Hotel 
where she is to remain for a few weeks. Mrs. Costello 
makes yearly visits to California and always pays a visit 
to San Francisco where a large circle of friends await her 
coining. * * * 

Chicago Guests 

Mr. and Mrs. R. ( ',. Henning of Chicago have been visit- 
ing San Francisco and have been making their temporary 
home at the Fairmont Hotel. 

* * * 

The annual luncheon of Corona Junior Auxilliary, for 
the installation of the club's newly elected officers, was 
held on Saturday afternoon, in Drury Lane, Hotel Whit- 
comb. Luncheon was followed by cards in the Roof Gar- 
den. The new officers are Mr-. II. C. Brown, 11. R. Kip- 
pert, Mrs. Robert Christie, Miss Beatrice Hoyen, and Mrs. 
E. R. Kaufman. ( Ither guests who attended the luncheon 
included Mesdames C. B. Ahl, A. C. Brown. F. C. Cooper, 
W. J. Davis. Jean Christie, A. J. Cooke. F. W. Fliltner, 
M. R. Knoph. Stella Jones, Kloise lloffmeyer, William 
Mason, E. B. Stone. A. Tellefson, Joana Yeater, T. Wolff 
and Misses Ina Andrews. Marguerite Brandlein, Jean 
Dickie. Julia Geary, Shirley Gray. Shirley Harris. Miriam 

Linnell, Betty Riddell, Grace Lindauer. 

* * * 

( >n Friday afternoon, the Utile Dulce Club held its 
regular monthly meeting in the Roof Garden of the Hotel 
Whitcomb. Mrs. J. Milton Holmes, vice president of the 
club, presided over the meeting, which was given over to 
a few details of business and was then adjourned in mem- 
mory of the late Dr. Abel W. Johnson, husband of Mrs. 
Johnson, president of the club. The newly elected officers 
of the club are Mrs. Abel W. John -on, Mrs. Milton Holmes, 
Mrs. Z. ( ). Waters and Mrs. Walter Matson. 

* * * 

Lovely Bride 

One of the prettiest weddings of the present season took 
place in the gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel on the 
evening of January 16, when Miss Beryl Lenore Silberstein 
became the bride of Mr. Arthur Harry I.icht. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

850 Bunfa Street. Bet-ween Powell and Stockton, San Franoiaoo 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



fcnuary 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 

750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



The bride was a picture in her gown of ele- 
gant white satin and lace, the insets of lace 
King embelished with rows of pearls intricate- 
ly placed so that the satin was enhanced in 
beauty by the rare lace of filmy quality and de- 
sign. A long veil fell from her coiffure, trailing 
in lengths with rose point lace edging the tulle, 
while orange blossoms fell in dainty clusters 
upon the veil. She carried a bouquet of lilies 
of the valley and gardenias with a lace edging 
held against the bridal gown. 

Rabbi Newman performed the marriage cer- 
emony which took place beneath a bower of 
roses and smilax in the center of the Fairmont 
ballroom. An arched pathway with tall vases 
holding pink sweet peas and gardenias led to 
the marriage altar, with its cluster of tall 
candles on either side from which fell festoons 
of mses. 

Mrs. Lillian Davidson was the matron of 
honor. Miss Shirley Silberstein was the maid 
of honor and there were eight bridesmaids 
completing the beautiful vision of the youth- 
ful bridal party. They all wore bouffant gowns 
of taffeta and billows of fluffy tulle. 

Miss Alma Slyvia Jacobs wore an exquisite pink gown 
shading- from the palest pink to the pastels and then to the 
coral colors. She carried a shower of pink roses, and wore 
a large pink rose in her hair. All of the bridesmaids were 
dressed alike, their gowns differing only in the colors of 
soft pastel shadings. The other bridesmaids were: Frances 
Bodke, Lucille Rhinestein, Marjory Mensor, Linette Ser- 
enski, Marian Harris, Miriam Davidson and Frances David- 
son. 

Mr. Louis T.icht was best man. 

Dr. Albert M. Jacobs, Messrs. Dave Hirsch, Samuel 
Wacksman, Irwin Kaufman, Leonard Melzer, Lawrence 
Silberstein, Edward Licht were the ushers. 

The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. \be Silbcr- 

tein. She was graduated from Miss Hamlin's School and 

Iter attended the University of California. The groom 

is the son of Mr. Samuel Licht. They will make their 

home in t lakland, where Mr. Licht is established in business 

Handsome Gown 

Mrs. leiinie facobs was one of the must admired of the 
bride's relatives, in her handsome gown oi black lace 
trimmed in sequins. 

Mrs. Lillian Davidson wore .1 lovelj gown of -"it pastel 
shades. Mrs. Abe Silberstein, mother oi the bride, was in 
an elegant yellow and sequin gown. 

An elaborate banquet followed the wedding attended by 
main relatives and friends. The eastern end of the gold 
ballroom was set with small tables profusely decorated with 
flowers and bridal tokens, 



Weatherwax Ball Most 
Brilliant Society Event 

The red and white ball given h\ Mr. and Mr-. Clifford 
Weatherwax it the I'.urlingamc Country Club last Satur- 
da\ night is still being discussed in Society as one of the 
Cost brilliant society events since the last Weatherwax 
hall. 

Everything about the ball was registered in red and 
white. The invitation-, to begin with, were of the colors 
named. The decorations were of red and white. In the 
conn oi the Country Club at Burlingame were hung yards 
of white chiffon as a background for the radiant red. Hun- 
dred- of white ami red balloons were suspended from the 
ceiling and afterward- set free to accentuate the tone ot 
the societx event. 



Porch Done in Red 

The veranda of the club house was decor- 
ated in brilliant red. The supper room was 
in red, the banquet tables covered with silver 
cloth and baskets of red flowers in the center 
of the table. Even the refreshments carried 
out the red and white idea, with many novel- 
ties introduced. 
Ravishing Gowns 

Mrs. Clifford Weatherwax, the hostess, 
greeted the guests at the red-and-white ball 
dressed in a French court costume of radiant 
red. She wore a gorgeous white wig. Mr. 
Weatherwax was in a Cossack costume of 
white, with white boots and a tall Cossack cap 
of white fur. 

Miss Helen Crocker was in a flame-colored 
costume, made of chiffon. Her head dress 
was of red and silver. 

Mrs. Tobin Clark wore an elegant Persian 
costume of white with a stunning pearl head- 
dress. 

Miss Alice Hagar wore a ravishingly at- 
tractive silver dress topped by a fetching red 
hat. 

Mrs. Roy Pike selected for her gown a Venetian court 
dress with immense hoopskirts of red taffeta. Her hat was 
a tricorn of flaming red, draped with a veil of gold and she 
wore a wig of the same shade. 

Goldfish Gown 

Mrs. Nion Tucker had on a most original gown made to 
represent a gold fish. Mr. Tucker wore a robe representing 
111 design a large red dragon. Their costumes were de- 
clared two of the most original. 

Miss Mary Tobin wore a folly costume of red made with 
lull fluffy skirts adorned with silver trimmings. Her cap 
was of silver. 

Miss Virginia Patricia Tobin had on a gown of the va- 
quero style, with which she wore red chaps, a red and 
white striped shirt, a red silk kerchief around her neck, and 

a si tmbrero. 

Mrs. Crocker's Gown 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker's costume was of white satin 
with full ruffles edged with tulle. Her hat was of red 

-at in. 

Mi-- Inez Meiia impersonated little \lei\ Riding Hood, 

with a red satin cape and hood. She carried a white basket. 

Mrs. Richard McCreery wore a Russian skating costume. 



Guatemala Visitors 

Interesting visitors from afar now spending some time 
in this city include \\ . von Ixuhlmann, German Minister to 
.ill the Central American countries; who. with Mrs. Kuhl- 
mann. arrived here this past week, making their home af 
the Fairmont Hotel for the present. They plan to remain 
Or about a month before proceeding to their home in 
Guatamala City by wax of Mexico. 

* * * 
Burlingame Set 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hays Smith gave a dinner party 
last week at their home in Burlingame. Their guests were 
5. and Mesdames Richard McCreery. Ross \mblcr 
Curran, Laurence I. Scott, lane Dunn Dutton, Templeton 
Crocker, Frederick McN'ear. Captain and Mrs. Edward Mc- 
Caulev and the Messrs. Paul Fagan and Frederick Till- 
man. 

(Continued on Page 17 1 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 





C. J. Pennington 

Radio "Nuts" 

JUST what can or cannot be done 
with a receiving- set is the stum- 
bling- block in the way of a proper un- 
derstanding on the part of the layman. 
His judgment is handicapped by the 
numerous remarkable things he bears 
and his imagination, in many cases, 
causes call letters of a local broadcast 
station to sound like a transmitter a 
thousand miles away. 

When people fall for the wiles of 
radio, they as a rule fall bard and over- 
night. Truthful and law abiding cit- 
izens become confirmed radio nuts. Not 
that there happens to be any serious ill 
effects from contracting- radioitis, but 
in a man's confirmation to the realms 
of becoming a DX hunter it causes 
many a one to let bis imagination get 
the better of bis integrity in telling of 
his exploits of the air. 

Of course, distant reception is ob- 
tainable, but there really is a limit to 
what a man can receive in one evening. 
\\ e know a man who is very boastful 
of the capabilities of his receiver and 
bis wonderful tales of reception are 
worth repeating. "On New Year's .lay 
he did not bother with a local station 
for the reception of the football game 
at Pasadena, but tuned in on a Chicago . 
station direct and enjoyed the entire 
" anie „ witn C1 'ystal clearness in day- 
light." That is what we would term 
reception of the highest order, were it 
possible. In fact, we had to listen to 
him and this particular set must be a 
wonder! as for selectivity, no two sta- 
tions have ever been known to over- 
lap, and we all know how easilv dis- 
tance is brought in with local on ! How- 
ever, we do not vouch for this story, 
but our one ambition is to hear that 
receiver ! 



There is another set owner, one who 
has recently acquired a set of the five 
tube variety, who took his purchase to 
the San Joaquin valley for a vacation 
and bis reports are undoubtedly re- 
markable. He bad Chicago every eve- 
ning and not once during his two weeks 
stay did he hear a broadcast station 
from San Francisco. We fail to under- 
stand this situation unless this particu- 
lar set is a long distance receiver and 
will not reproduce any station closer 
than 500 miles. 

And then confirmed radio nuts won- 
der why they are avoided by the aver- 
age set owner. — Is there a reason? 



A New Type "A" Power Unit 

A new device called the Westing- 
house "A" Autopower is now avail- 
able for the consumer. It comprises a 
storage battery, a trickle charger and a 
switch in one unit, which provides a de- 
pendable source of "A" power from the 
lighting circuit. 

The feature of this device is a new 
type of rectifier, or trickle charger, 
which is the only kind that does not 
require replacement of rectifying units. 
There is absolutely nothing to wear 
out or replace in this trickle charger 
and it has no solid nor liquid electro- 
lyte. It operates by means of an elec- 
tron discbarge between a copper plate 
and an oxide formed on the surface of 
the plate. There is no depreciation and 
the life is unlimited. 

The rectifying element consists of 
sixteen copper discs 1/16 in. thick and 
l'j in. in diameter, mounted on ma- 
chine bobs with necessary connectors. 
This rectifying element is fed from a 
small transformer with an insulated 
secondary, which prevents any pos- 
sibility of a circuit being established 
from the lighting circuit through the 
receiving tubes to ground with a result- 
ing tube burn-out. 

A small eight-contact double-throw 
toggle switch is used to control the 
Autopower unit, and a slight change in 
the wiring of this switch will permit 
the use of the unit in conjunction with 
an automatic control switch such as is 
used for controlling- both a trickle 
charger and a B-eliminator from the 
battery switch on the receiving set. 

The charging ,-ate can be varied from 

1/10 ampere to T S ampere with two 

intermediate steps by simply changing 

the position of connecting links' be- 

(Continued on Page 14) 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO — 428.3 
Sunday, January ^:t 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
non-sectarian church service. 

lft:45 a. in. — Weather forecast. 

2:40 to 4:15 p. m. — Concert of the S:in Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion oi Alfred Hertz, broadcast bv KPO. 
KGO and KFI. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra, 

6:30 p. m. — General information. 

6:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Conceit Or- 
cht-st pa. 

8:35 to 10:1111 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

1":"" to 12:00 p. m.— John Wolohan and his 
Ca I [fornians. 

Monday, January 24 

6:45, 7:16. 7:45 a. m. — Dally Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Tittle signals. Scripture reading 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hot,] Concerl 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7;iiii p. in. — Shil.-s Restaurant Drohes. 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
* irchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to s:ln i>. in. — Chamber of Commerce talk 

8:10 to 8:25 p. m. — Book revii ws by Harold 
-\. Small. 

k:2.". to 9:00 p. m. — Brian,, lesson No. 13 

»:v» to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

1":"" to 11:00 p. in. — Billy Long's Cablrlana 

11:"" to 12:"" i.. m.— KPO Variety Hour. p. in- 
uring KI'M's well known artists. 

Tuesday. January -3 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Dally Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:15 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5-30 p. m, — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m.— Children's Hour 

i.:l.i to 6 :;.i ,, ,„._s k market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7 : ™ !° l : VL p - m -~ Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

*■"" to :>:<><> p. in.— -r. i:i Wi op Hour." 

: i" 10:00 p. in.— studio program 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. in.— Billy Long's Cablrlana 

Widnesdny. January ^c 

6:45, 7:16, 7: 15 a. m.- Dailj Health Drill. 

10.30 a. 111. — V\ eather for, •rust. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk 

12:00 noon— Time signals and Scripture read- 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert 
orchestra. 

3:3ft to 5:3ft p. m.— Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour 

V.\l '.^ K"."' m— Stock ma-ket quotations. 

6.30 to 7:00 p. m.— States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. in.— Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra, 

7:3ft to S:ftft p . m.— DX 

S-nn !° VH°,J- m — A twater Kent Artists. 

I "0 lo in ii.— Studio program 

10:00 to liino p. m.— States Restaurant Or, 
chestra. 

II "" to i2:iui p. m.— John Wolohan and ins 

' :i 1 1 1 'il II la iis. 

ThurMdny, .1 iary '17 

5n 4 .in 7:1S ' 7: i5 «■«">— Daily Health Drill. 

10.30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. in. — cooking hints and recipes 



January 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:^0 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

U:15 to 0:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

0:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p, m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

I!i:ii0 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

ll:ii(i to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Friday, January 28 

ti:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m.— Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion Talk. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

G:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

li:30 to 7:20 p. m. — States Restaurant orches- 
tra. 

K20 to 7:30 p, m. — "Sports on the air." 

BO to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 
mi to 10:00 p. m. — Walter KrausgriU's Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

11:imi to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Saturday, January -<:. 

6:45, 7:15/7:45 a. m.— Daily Health Drill. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

iii:ifi a, in. — Cooking hints and recipes, 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ng. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. in, — Fairmont H«>u-i Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:3o to r.:r,o p. m. — Palace Hotel C >ert Or- 

chest ra. 

(l : I 5 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 
30 to 7:30 p, m, — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra, 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

■00 to 9:00 p, in. — Simultaneous broadcast 
lc\ K l'i i and KFI. 

:on to 10:00 p. m.— Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

i to 11:00 p. m. — Walter KrausgriU's Or- 

chest ra. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
Daily Except Sunday 

:):imi iii 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 
$00 in 4:00 p. m, — Vocal and Instrumental 

Seled ions. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sunday, Janunrj -:t 

I B0 to S:u(P p. m.— Sundaa school. 
3:oii to 5:00 p. m.— Temple service 
8:00 to 10:00 p. in- — livening servl 
Monday. Januarj -4 

i ' ::u i,, i;oo n in — Dailj Scripture reading. 

'l'iK'siln> . .In mi a i ■> -."i 

i' 10 to 1:00 p, m-- Dally Scripture reading. 

s (in to 10 00 p. hi -Studio progi am. 

\\ t iioi'siiiiy. January 26 

l j 30 to 1:00 p in —Dally Scripture reading. 

2:30 to 4:00 p. in - l "ivine hei Ice. 

B :00 to i i p. m. — Studio program, 

ThurHdtiy, Jnnnnn - T 

I I i' to 1 no p. ni, — l>aily Scripture reading. 

I'*rhla> . .1 :i ii it ii r > *J^> 

i n ii l Scripture reading. 

I 00 to 10 00 1 1 .. ram. 

3:0n to t 00 p. m.— Sunshine hour. 

Nil iiioini . January 20 

12:30 to i on p. in. — Daily Scripture reading, 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 
Bund ii) . Jnnuai > -:t 

11 'in :i in — Trinity Kpiscnpal rhurcl 
San Francl 
to. — San i 5j mphony Orches- 

. 
tn's Symphony On 



7:30 ii. m. — Weather bureau report. 

< :::."i ]>. m. — Trinity Episcopal Church ser- 
vice, San Francisco. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Bern's Symphony Orches- 
tra. 

Monday, January 114 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

*:00 to 5:00 p, m. — California Federation of 

Women's Clubs. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m.— KGO Kiddies' Klub. 
(>:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
7:06 p. m.— S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing-). 

Tuesday, January 1!5 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington Concert. 

4:00 p. m. — Housekeeper's chat. 

5:00 p. m. — '"Mental Measurements," lecture. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

T:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cutton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 

Pilgrims." 
9:00 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 

Wdliicsiliiy, January -i; 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

3:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

8:00 to i:00 p. m, — Hotel Leamington concert, 
i ;00 p. in. — 1 1 ousekeeper's chat. 

5:30 p. m. — '"For instance," by General Jack- 
son. 

G on to 0:55 p. m: — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

i p. m.— s. K. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metal a. 

7:11 p. m, — X. Y. stock reports (closing"), 

7:21 p. m. — -S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 p. m.— is. F, Studio) Farm Program 

8:10 p, in. — (Series) "The Cattle Industry on 
the Pacific I toast." 

8:20 p. m. — An interview with the Agricul- 
tural Economist. 

B 80 p. m. — W.i >. W.Male Trio. 

9 10 p. in, — Address, "The King of Nuts — the 
Walnut." 

i I p. m. — W. O. W. Wale Trio. 

Thursday, January '27 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

i , p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 

i 12 p. m.- — Wea ther. 

3 mi I,, i nit pin -Hotel Leaml tig I on concert. 

i mi p in.— i hois, i.i . p. i - chat. 

; 8 "ii p. m . — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 

to Boys." 

5 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
m.— News. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather. 

p in. — S. F. Produce, Grain. Cotton, and 
Metals. 
7:14 p. ni. — X. Y. Stocks (closing). 
7:81 p. m.— s. i-\ 9 took s (closing). 
8:00 i" '.'::'." p. m Concert by Aahmes Temple 
Shriii- Band, Herman Trutner, l< 

Phil pot's midship- 
men. 

I'ridn>. January Js 

11:10 :i m.— Prudence Penny, Homem 

T:ilk. 

1 SO v m. — Hf, Y. Stock reports. 

1:87 p. m. — S F. Stock reports. 

l : 4j p ni — Weather Bureau reports. 

3:00 to -Hotel Leamington Concert 

in — Housekeeper's .-hut. 
6:00 to 6:66 p. m Ittle Symphony. 

I :.;. p m — N. « s items. 

p, m.— Weather Bureau rep 
- ,,,; p „, — s l\ IT. i. Ilk-., Grain. Cotton, and 

Met 
; ii p m — .\ y. Stock reports (closing). 
7 : jj ,, ,„_ — s. F. Stock reports (closing). 

s 00 to \> .hi p m idlo) Program. 

Nnliinlay. Jnnujirj M 

11:80 p m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 
■ 
p m. — S F Stocks. 

_ ■•■ • 
■hat. 
w . ekU s : r « 1: ' ' " " ■'" ''>' A1 
,> m . — Program from the 

I Gunsendorfer s 




hoteil Mark Hoipkihs 

San Francmco 's smartest rendezvous . . . 
where Cddle Harkness and his Orchestra have 
won the hearts of the city 's smart set! 



TEA 'DANS ANT. Monday and Saturday 
Afternoons, four 'til six, One Dollar. 

CONCERT TEA * Tucs., Wed.. Thur., Fri. 
Afternoons, four 'til six, Fifty Cents. 

^D/NNER^INCE *Nightiy(exccptSun.) 
seven til nine. Table d'Hote, Two-fifty. 
No Couvert for Dinner GueSts. 

SUPPER'DANCE , Nightly (except Sun.) 
nine 'til one. Couvert Fifty Cents; Satur- 
day. Couvert One Dollar. 

Cuisine by ViSor 




Jollozv the 

Qolden c Road 

to Health! 



Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 6:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 






12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, V_>27 



Radio Program for Next Week 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 
Monday, January 24 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News Broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

y:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting Lake 

Merritt Ducks. 
'I' lies day. January 115 
!T:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, January -0 

6:30 10 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.^Special program. 

Thursday, January 27 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday, January 2S 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:45 p. m. — Program. 

9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Or- 
chestra, 

Saturday. January 2I> 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday. January 23 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday School Les- 
son. 

11:00 to 12:00 noon — Church services. 

Monday, January 24 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

Wednesday. January 2U 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

S:00 p. m. — Sacred songs. 

Thursday. January 27 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sacred variety program. 

Friday, January 2S 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Bible Study Hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Telephone or write in your health 
questions and they will be informally dis- 
cussed. 

Saturday. January 2P 

1:30 to 2:30 p. m. — Children's Church Broad- 
cast. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
Forecast; (b) Announcements of Churches 
for Sunday. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 

Sunday. January 23 

9:45 to Hl:45 a. m. — Prof. A. E. Linsley's Bible 

class. 
11:00 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
7:45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
Monday, January 24 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
fi:3fi to 7:fiii p. m.— Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Music from the Latin 

countries. 
Tuesday, January 25 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 

Stamp Collectors. 
8:15 to 10:00 p. m. — The KTAB Quartet. 
Wednesday. January 2(! 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to io:n(i p. m. — Evening <•{ National 

Airs. 
Thursday. January 27 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
Friday, January 2S 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:00 to 6:20 p. m. — Twenty minutes with Dr. 

Thompson. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 i" 9:00 p. m. — Los Gatos Cnion High 

School < trchestra, 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Goat Island Goats. 
Saturday. January 2a 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



KRE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 
Sunday. January 23 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Church Service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner Concert. 

8:15 to 9:00 p. m. — Social concert. 

Monday, January 24 

ill 5 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday. January 25 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Wednesday, January 2cs 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

Thursday. January 27 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, January 2S 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Sa ( u nla y , J an ua ry 2!) 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance program. 



KFI- 



-EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 



(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 

Sunday, January 23 

10:00 a. m. — Church Services under direction 
of L. A. Church Federation. 

2:45 p. m. — Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia presents San Francisco .Symphony 
Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, Conductor; broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI, KPO, KGO. 

6:30 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:4 5 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat and 
Father Ricard's Sun Spot weather forecast. 

7:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital; Alex 
Reilly at the console. 

8:00 p. m. — Packard Classic Hour. Sylvia 
Zeitlen Rosenthal, concert pianist. 

9:00 p. m. — Boh Bottger and his Venetians 
Dance Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill 
Hennessey, Director. 

Monday, January 24 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Furnishings for the 
Home by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Flour Home Service Tail:?. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks bv Agnes 
White. 

5:30 p. m.— Virgil Ray's Winter Garden Or- 
chestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 i>. in. — KFI Radio to rial Period. George 
Wilder i.'jirtw right, talks on the Constitu- 
tion. 

6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket period. 

i nil p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians 
Starke Sisters i Minnie and Maude). 

8:oo p. m. — Program by Will Garroway and 
Robert Hurd. 

9:00 p. m. — fiemi -classical music program. 

10:00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday* January 23 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee Program. 

6:00 p. m.— KFI Nightly Doings. 

fi:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — Dr. John T. Miller, "Human Na- 
ture Around the World." 

B:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Paul Howard's Quality Seren- 
aders. 

8:00 p. m. — Gattnne String Quartet. 

9:00 p. m. — Gleaners Quartet — Thomas Wal- 
lace, baritone, 

10:00 p. m. — Azure Music Club, Edna Cook. 

Wednesday, January -i> 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
bv Georgia O. 'leorge. 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on Child Training 
by Agnes White. 

10:40 to ll:oo a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Flour Hume Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnus 
White. 

5:30 p. m.— .lack Murray's Italian Village Or- 
chestra. 

6:00 p. m.— KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

fi:20 p. m. — KFI Radio to rial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians. 

7:30 p. m — Nick Harris. Detective Stories; 

8:00 p. m.— James Burroughs, tenor, on pro- 
gram by California Petroleum Corporation. 

9:00 p. m. — Virginia McCoy, contra-contralto; 
S. A. I. Trio. 

10-00 p, m. — Sunset Instrumental Quartet — 
Dorothy Ruth Miller, concert pianist, 



III ii rxda y, J a n u a ry 117 

5:30 p. m. — Sebastian s Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:00 p. m. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

6:35 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by University of South- 
ern California. 

8:00 p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 

9:00 ]■. ni. — Popular program. 

10:00 p. m.— Johnston & Farrell's Music Box 
I [our, direction of Gene Johnston. 

r'rhia>, January -S 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

lo:i'o t<> im:4o a. in. — Talk on home manage- 
ment by Agnes Whit'-. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — .Betty Crocker. Gold 
Medal Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 — Food Talks by Agnes White. 

5:30 p. in. — i;ug<-n<- Biscalluz, 

6:00 p. m. — KFl Nightly Doings. 

6 l" p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 
-KFI Radiotorial Period. 
-Baron Keyes, The Radio Ilam- 



G 20 p 
6:35 p 

l>l< j r. 
7:00 !'. 



m.— Program by l'aul Roberts and 
Leslie Adams, whistler. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Alex Reil- 
ly at the console. 

9:00 p. m. — Alma Frances Gordon, contralto. 
Del Monte String Trio. 

10:00 p. m. — rackard Ballad Hour. 

SaturdaTi January -!) 

5:30 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Angeleno Ag- 
gravators. 

6:00 p. in. — KFI Nightly Doings. 

6:10 p. m. — KFI Radio Travel Guide. 

6:20 p. m. — Madame Nelson. 

6 :35 p. m. — Program by Russian Academy ol 
Musical An — Boris Myron off, Piano. 

7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Lyric 
barl tone — Edna Clarh Mulr, pianist. 

* :00 p. m.- — »M ission Bell Orchestra, Pryoa 
Moore, director: James Burroughs, tenor J 
Program by Los Angeles Soap Company! 
broadcast simultaneously by KFI, ami 
KPO. 

9:00 p. m. — Mary Christine Albin Trio, and 
Gamut Mai.- Quartet on the program by 
the Associated Packard Dealers. Broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI ami KPO. 

10:00 i'. ni. — Packard "Radio Club — Esther 
Walker, pia nist . Helen l ruesl 

11:00 i». m> — KFI Midnight Frolic; Virgil 
Ray's Winter Garden Or chest ra. 

KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES — 337 
Daily Except Sunday 
7:30 a. m. — KNX Morning 
8:00 a. m. — Inspirational 

prayer. 
8:55 a. m. — Time Signals. 
9:00 a. m. — Chopping News. 
10:30 a. m. — Household Economics except Frl 

day and Saturday. 
1 2 ;iin ni.—< ieortie I N-rt man's < ■ relies tra. 
1:30 p. m. — The Book Worm. 
5:46 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 
4:55 p. m. — Market reports. 
6:00 p. r.i. — Concerl i trchest ra. 
6:3C p. m. — Atwater Kent orchestra. 
S 1 1 ii 1 1 ii y , January -'.'■ 
10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hoi 

I y wood. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

* p. m.— Roberts' Golden State Band. 

0:30 p. m. — Hollywood Unitarian Church. 
7:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly 

wood. 
8:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
9:00 p. m. — Feature Program. 



Gym. 

talk and morning 




January 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Monday. January 24 

8:00 p. m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

4:00 p. m. — Little Jean. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

" ffl p. m. — Playlet. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

j,. On p. m. — KNX Feature program. 

SOO p. m. — KNX Feature program. 

Tuesday, January 25 

3:00 p. m. — Combined program by Police and 
Fire Depts. 

4:00 P- m. — Radio matinee. 
00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
|0 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

" 00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Wednesday, January 26 

4:00 p. m. — Talk on care of children. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Thursday, January 27 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

7:00 p. m. — Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Friday, January 28 

3:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program. 

7:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Saturday, January 20 

BO p m. — The Town Crier of the Day. 

7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 

7-16 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices of the leading Los Angeles churches. 

7:30 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
00 p. m. — Feature program. 
00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchesl in 

jl mi ,, m , — KNX Frolic from the main studio. 



KJR — NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 

SEATTLE— 384.4 
Sunday, January 2^ 

11:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 

7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:16 p. m, — Evening Servioe. 

5(15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under direction 
of Henry Damski. 

Monday, .January 24 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 0:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
10 to 0:30 p. m. — K.lK News ttemi 
:so to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

iicnn toil :00 p. m. — Dance music 

Tiu'Kday. January 2r, 

i i in 10:30 a. m.— Posl Intelligencer ralk. 

ffl:30 to 1 1:30 a. m.— Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

6:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:06 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

G-.u. to 6:80 p. ni - k.ik Sews Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

in ;00 p. m.— Time Signals. 

\\ » (in*- viin j . Jannnrs 2« 

in nil i,. in 30 a. m. — Posl Intelligencer I lIV 

ln:;n to ii 30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

B;00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p, m. — Musical program 

6:40 to 0:00 p. m. — New York Stock quotation* 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:06 to fi:l0 p. m. — Weather report* 

(i:ii, t,> 6:30 p m. — KJR News Items. 

in on p in rials. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Danca mualo. 

flPhurKday. January 27 

in .,m to in 30 ;t. in- Post Intelligencer Talk. 
1:80 1 Program, 

12:H0 ni. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m.— Time Signals. 

to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:3ii p- m. — KJR News Iloi 
8:30 to 10:00 p. in. — Studio program, 
nala 
ce Muslo. 

BrM«y, .Inniiiirj 3N 

in - Post Intelligencer Talk. 
i a m- -Musical Program. 

12:00 m.- Time Signals, 
8:00 to 4:00 p. m — Musical program. 
|:40 io 6:00 p. ni. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 



6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
Saturday, January 21) 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 
12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 
6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 
6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 
10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday, January 23 

11:00 a. m. — Church service. 

6:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

7:45 p. m. — Church service. 

Monday, January 24 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Children's hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

S;15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday. January 25 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

:;:::ii p. m. — Comedy sketch. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Farm question box. 

9:00 p. m. — Instruction in Auction Bridge. 

Wednesday, January 20 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Wynken. Blynken and Nod. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8 i ;, p, in — si uiio. program. 

Thursday, January 27 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. ni. — Organ recital. 

3 I :• p ni.— Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

1:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

I ir. p. m. — Fashion review. 

| p. m.- -Stocks, markets, livestock. 

I'ridiiv. January -* 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

TJ:15 p. m. — Instrumental Concert. 

1:00 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

8:16 P- m — Talk. 

* p. m. — Matinee for housewives, 
l 30 p. m. — Question Box. 

m, — Fashion Review. 

p, m -Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:00 p ,m. — "Aggie Klckoffs." 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 

ool lesson. 
^ mi j> m.— Instrumental program. 
s;i:> p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday, January 20 
ii |6 .i in Weather, 1 1 ... reports, 
ii,, m -Organ Recital. 
10:30 p. m. — l»ance program. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 250 

smi<itt> . January 2.'t 

100 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

" P m — £ ai ' ' " i . t m 

, •• oo p m,— S< ideas! fr.-m 

h Church of Christ Scientist 

: i., i i- m.— Laura Ellen winsora 

pupils. 
Monday, Januar* 24 

I mi p in.— Impromptu Studio pro- 

8 ST*™ 6 10 p m -Jern Hills and his CJke. 
,, m -Jell-X-Cell program. 

p. m.— Studio program. 
i0 p m. — Impromptu Studio pro- 
... 
, „. mUj (•"■".'Z-lropromi -„ studio program. 

►onato and < lem 
s N^taO P m— Ionaco with Gaylord Wll- 
., oo - program. 

'r'TVo^-m.-l'mpromptu Stua.o Pro- 

m.— Bill Bennett and Or.ris 

1 1 a 1 ■ 

I p. m.- .1. irram. 

iei Ine and I I'm 

P. m — Becker storage program. 

(Continued o\ Pag« 14) 




Sunset Way 
East 

« • scenic route through the southland 

East by way of Apache Trail, El 
Paso.andjuarez.historic San An- 
tonio, to New Orleans, colorful 
metropolis of the south. See the 
great Mardi Gras. 

Now travel east aboard world- 
famous Sunset Limited. Equip- 
ped and manned to delight the 
most discriminating. Observation 
and club cars, Pullman comfort, 
Southern Pacific dining car service. 
Maid,barber,valet;shower-baths. 

Sunset Limited leaves here daily 
at 6:15 p. m. Tourist sleeper to 
Washington, D. C. over Sunset 
route; leaves 9:00 p.m. 

Also the Argonaut daily Los 
Angeles to New Orleans. Leave 
here 9:00 p.m. for connection. 

Southern 
Pacific 

Phone Daienport 4000 for all officii 

Ferry Building 65 Geary St. 

Third Street Station 

Oakland 

Phone Lakeside 1420 for information 

bureau and all offices 

13th and Broadway 16th St. Station 

1st and Broadway Station 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



January 22, VJ2 



S:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Impromptu Studio pro- 
gram. 

Thursday, January 27 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio pro- 
gram. rt , 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Kwartett Dance Orches- 
tra. 

8:00 to S:30 p. m. — Henry Haman, tenor. 

S:30 to 9:00 p. m. — George Taylor and Clem 
Kennedy. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, January 2S 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Billy Devine and Alberta 
Worden. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Jell-X-Cell Program. 

S:00 to S:30 p. m. — Gertrude Tracy and Clem 
Kennedy. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — 'Ionaco" with Gaylord 
Wilshire. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Henry Bickford Pa-smore 
and his pupils. 

Saturday, January 2i) 

12:00 to 2:00 a. m. — Impromptu studio pro- 
gram. 

KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Sunday. January 23 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Monday, January 24 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program featuring Ken- 
neth Gilium. popular songs. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Trio. 

10:10 p. m. — "Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tuesday. January 25 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments, 
to buy." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Program featuring Fran- 
ces ,St. George, blues. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — News items. 

8:10 to 9:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Syncopators. 

9:10 to 10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday. January 24, 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sun- 
shine. 

7:30 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting Announce- 
ments. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Syncopa- 
tors. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thursday, January 27 

fi:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Syncopa- 
tors. 

9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Syncopators. 

10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Friday, January 2S 

fi:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments, interspersed with musical numbers. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

s:ii0 to M:ini p. in. — Warner Bros. Syncopators. 

9:00 to 10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

10:00 p. in. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday, January 2i> 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Virginia King, blues. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Syncopa- 
tors. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 10) 
tween the four contacts. Less current 
is used from the lighting; circuit than 
that required for a fifteen watt lam]). 
The storage battery is rated at about 
45 ampere-hour capacity, sufficient for 
use up to a ten-tube set. The battery 
has a rubber case and its internal de- 
sign is such that it will outlast several 
storage batteries of the usual type. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 

(Continued from Page 7) 
Mme. Bedini, the lovely horse-back 
rider with her intelligent $50,000 horse. 
Jack Morgan — oh, how he thrilled us! 
Then there were the Honey Family. 
which the Pantages circuit imported 
for the circus; Venus, in her slide for 
life; Sir Victor's European dog and 
pony circus — Miss Golde, queen of the 
silver thread, who walks the tight 
wire; and the Three Astrail Sisters, 
who hang in midair by their teeth. < )h, 
Pantages have thrills galore — at the 
circus and no one wants to miss the 
treat they offer us. 

This past week marked the second 
of their annual circus "Indoors." 
* * * 

California 
General Manager Edward B. Baron 

of Publix Theaters announces "Blonde 
or Brunette" as the screen feature ■ if 
the California theater following the 
conclusion of "Bertha, the Sewing Ma- 
chine Girl." 

Adolphe Menjou is the star in 
"Blonde or Brunette" which starts to- 
day, Saturday. Greta Xissen takes the 
role of the blonde; and Arlette Mar- 
chal represents the brunette type. 

The Sherwoods provide musical at- 
tractions. * * ,;, 
Granada 

Reginald Denny, starring in "The 
Cheerful Fraud" comes to the Granada 
for the week commencing with Satur- 
day's showings. Gertrude Olmstead, 
( His Harlan, Gertrude Astor, Emily 
Fitzroy, Charles Gerrard are other 
principals. 

Eddie Peabody, comes back to the 
Granada theater after his vacation 
with increased pep and a new repoir- 
toire of musical numbers than which 
the city has no better to offer. Eddie 
Peabody is a musician of high stand- 
ards and his programs are excellent 
both in presentation and in musician- 
ship. Featured, also, will be the "Mar- 
velous Scovell Three," said to be a 
most sensational dancing act. Did you 
see Elinor Glyn's "It" last week with 
Clara Bow, the star? The picture 
lives up to its publicity — and that is 
fulsome praise. 
St. Francis 

The appearance of Harold Lloyd in 
"The Kid Brother" at the St. Francis 
theater has packed the playhouse and 
there are insistent demands for an- 
other week of this comedy-drama in 
which Lloyd scores another of his big 
hits. 

Photographic achievements on the 
screen flash before us in each new big 
photoplay and in "The Kid Brother" 
is this especially exemplified. Tobyna 
Ralston plays the heroine in this ro- 
mance which has a real plot and thrills 



in abundance. Walter James takes the 

senior role. 

Cameo 

"Take It From Me" one of the mer- 
riest super comedies based on the 
Broadway stage success, will be shown 
at the popular Cameo theater, with 
Reginald Denny the star, starting Sat- 
urday, January 22, and continuing for 
four days. 

Blanche Mehaffey plays the sweet- 
heart in this happy picture. Accord- 
ing to the story the hero falls heir to 
some money and then to a department 
Store. According to strange specifica- 
tions in the will, a plot is formed to 
make him lose his money, but the store 
pays well and the comical way in which 
Dennv makes his money supplies the 
excitement and thrills. 

"Fig Leaves," a William Fox pro- 
duction will be screened from W'edne — 
dav. fanuary 2i> to Friday, with ( ieorge 
O'Brien and Olive Borden the stars. 
The picture was made from an original 
story by Howard Hawks, showing a 
modern Eve revolting against low- 
without luxury. Phyllis Haver and 
Andre de Beranger are in the cast. It 
has a cle\ er plot. 

* * * 

Alhambra 

The beautiful Alhambra theater on 
I 'oik street, near Green, will screen "Fig 
Leaves" today, Saturday, January 22, 
featuring the son of Chief of Police 
O'Brien, (ieorge O'Brien, in the leading 
role with Olive Borden playing op- 
pi site. 

"So's Your Old Man" is the picture 
for Sunday, starring \V. C. Fields with 
Alice Joyce and Charles Rogers in this 
picture packed with laughter and live- 
ly action. Charles Chase will appear 
in the short comedy reel, "There Ain't 
Xo Santa Clans." 

"Subway Sadie" will be the Alham- 
bra theater screen feature for Monday; 
Tuesday and Wednesday. Rod La 
Rocque comes to the Alhambra in "I ri- 
golo" on Thursday for two days' show- 
ing. 

(Continued on Page 22) 



CLUB 
Auto Service Co, 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



585 Post St. 

San Francisco 



January 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 
Holiday Cruises to Norway by R. M. S. P. "Araguaya" 
XT' ) noise but the rhythmic beat of the boat's engines as 
[_^ she glides through the placid waters o£ the fjord. 
\lin\e, a clear blue sky; below, deep, deep mysterious 
waters : around, steep tree-clad slopes, reaching up to the ar- 
lent sun that silvers their snow-capped heads and sets a 
himniering haze dancing over their cool green skirts; 
iropping down almost sheer to the crystal depths that lap 
their fringe. 

Ahead, a sharp bend in the fjord. What lies beyond? 
Another glacier, gleaming blue and white, like that we 
passed a while ago? Or another lonely log hut, its roof 
blaze with flowers springing from its earthy thatch? 
A-ah ! A foaming, leaping, tumbling, rushing cataract, 
pray tossed in air, a myriad bubbles gleaming rainbow- 
like in the sun, that makes the breath catch in our throats. 
On, on we go, winding up fjords for one hundred miles or 
more, coming now upon a quaint red and yellow and white 
(Silage nestled in a hollow, now upon a wild and rugged 
tretch of inspiring grandeur. 

On board the R. M. S. P. "Araguaya" you are free to en- 
joy every moment of your trip. The most inexperienced 
yoyagcr need not dread the still waters of the Norwegian 
Bast, and even if they were much rougher they would still 
hold no terrors For the traveler on that floating palace, the 
Araguaya." With the steadiness of a 10,000 ton ship, well- 
ventilated cabins, perfect cuisine and courteous service, you 
might be in London's best hotel. But far better than in 
any hotel is the feeling of comradeship as you join in or 
watch the games on deck by day ami the dances by night. 
New friends, new experiences, new life are yours if you 
join a k. ML S. P. Cruise. 

Places Visited 
The following is a very short description of the places 
visited, arranged in order as the Cruise proceeds. 

( lie. At the head of the Xorangfjonl. lies amid Alpine- 
.ike scenery. The long ranges of mountains appear very 
beautiful in the evening glow. From lure you take a de- 
lightful drive through the Norangdol to Hellesylt. 

Ilcllesvll. Stands in a grand position at the entrance o) 
the Sunelvsfjord, affording line views of the Falls on Sun- 
dais River. 

Merok. On Geiranger Fjord, This fjord is celebrated 
for its stupendous magnificence. The numerous waterfalls, 
particularly the renowned "Seven Sisters," are very beau- 
tiful, gleaming like' silver against the steep black rock-. 

( llden. At the mouth of the ( ildendal. This is the start- 
ing place for a very fascinating excursion to the Brigsdal 
Clavier a veal "Blue Glacier"; considered to by one of the 
tines! in Norwav. The scenery is most imposing. 

l.oeu. For Lake l.oen. Surrounded by snow-capped 
mountain ranges, intersected with beautiful green \ alleys. 

|ake Loen presents quite an Alpine appearance. The great 

lling glacier Halseth, with its masses ,,( blue ice con- 
stantly moving down the mountain side; the Steep Raven- 

fjeld and the Nonsnib towering 6,000 feet above you, make 
a wonderful picture. 



New Reserve Officers' Chief 
The manager and vice-president of the Golden Gate 
Ferr\ Company, Harry E, Speas, has been chosen just re- 
fcnth as 1 hief of the Reserve Officers' Association of the 

United States. 

Mr. Speas has pro\ e,l so efficient as Xfajor in the Quarter- 
master Corps Reserves, that it goes without saying he will 
his laurels as president, lie 1- a born executive, as 
the position he has occupied as manager ''i the Golden 
Gate tleei of l"err\ boats will show. 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Stbret 
In Virginia Hotel 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Sam FuHciao* 
Pbonb FxANKLni ISlt 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1884 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

3SS TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Oouslna 3084 



SPECIAL MIXED 

GLADIOLUS BULBS 

$3.00 per 100 

S. F. SEED and BULB CO. 

147 Fifth Street, San Francisco 
Phone Sutter 4494 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, Qeneral cAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutttr 2J42 



16 



THE SAN FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tanuarv 22, VJ27 



Finance 



THE recent decision of the Supreme Court in the fam- 
ous "Peralta" fish reduction case is hailed by fish 
canners and packers and the officials of the California Fish 
and Came Commission as meaning: the end of the fight of 
those interests to protect the sardine and other coramefi 
cial fish ali.ng; the coast from diversion into fertilizers, and 

fish-oil instead of into edible food products. 

* * * 

— Leon R. Yankwich. professor of law at Loyola College 
and member of the Los Angeles Bar has come out with a 
statement in which he says that the Criminal Syndicalism 
law has been a failure, as a measure, and has actually in- 
cited to violence. He quotes the conclusions arrived at by 

Dr. Kirchwey in his examination of the law with appr 

* * * 

— It will be a surprise to many to learn that applicatii ins 
for permit to sell corporation stock aggregating $417,067,- 
707.48 were refused by the corporation commissioner. He 
says that many of the schemes were criminal in their nature 
and thinly veiled attempts to enrich the promoters at the 
expense of the public. Others were based on purely vision- 
ary ideas. The corporation commissioner claims to have 
saved each man. woman and child in the State $100 by 
preventing these schemes. Let me see v. air $100! 

* * * 

— It is. according to the Southern Pacific Development 
Department, desirable, but not yet generally feasible, fof 

railways to finance by sale of stock rather than by borrow- 
ing the money. Money needed for capital expenditure of 
late years has been furnished mostly through the sale 
of bonds. This situation cannot be changed materially 
until railway stocks have been established, not only on a 
sure but also an adequate dividend basis. 

* * * 

— It has been pointed out that the new immigration 
policy of the United States has had effects verv different 
from those contemplated. Now, the immigrant, who is ef- 
fectively prevented from contact with his people, owing 
to the quota system, comes, not with the intention of be- 
c< ming a citizen, but merely 1. 1 make mi iney and si i di >es not 
trouble to learn the language, more than necessity demands, 
and has not the least inclination to interest "himself in 
social matters. 

* * * 

— Last Saturday the "Fresno," one of the three new. all- 
steel electric ferry boats now being constructed for the 
Southern Pacific Company, was launched for Bay service. 
It is one of the most modern and largest Iriven 

ferry boats in the world. The engines are 450 horsepower 
each and there are four engines to a boat. It is 25 
long. 66 feet wide and cost $525,000. It has a capacity of 
from 95 to 100 automobiles. 

* * * 

^ — There is now a National Association of Securities 
Commissioners whose work it is to check off' the corpora- 
tion work of the respective states and to endeavor to 
thwart fraudulent investment as much as possible. This is 
a highly sounding ethical purpose, but we have always 
had our doubts about its effectiveness, and still more di 

It the ability of a corporation commissioner to estimate 
the value of a new idea in terms of it- possible Feasil 
*=;-■* 

—There is a great whetting of political knives at S 
niento and a mouth-dripping anticipation of the gravy in the 
new budget which, of course, will be much higher than 
heretofore. Economy is impossible to legislat rs! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 



COMMERCIAL 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH. 1868 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,550,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $565,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

\\ EST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 



Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4}£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident a 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




San Francisco, Calif. 
*44 Market Street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO. CANADA 
Paid In Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THIIf. 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND. ORE.: SEATTLE. WAJSH.: MEXICO CITY. MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE BE1THCOTE W. J. COILTHAHD 

Manager Asst. Managrer 



nd • 

ice \ 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
Walter W. Derr, Manager 
105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. | 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manujacturert of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE. TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



Los Angeles, CalLt. 
5717 Santa Pe Avenue 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements. Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Dnlldine (Opposite Palace Hotel). Son Francisco 

Phone Kearny 391 



1 



Inuary 22, 1 927 



THE SAN ]•}< \\< CO \IA\ S I.I 'IT l R 



17 



SOCIETY 
(Continued from Page 9) 
>Iew Art Institution 
iolds Reception of Note 

( )ne of the most important events on the social calen- 
dar for many-a day was the formal reception marking the 
■ening Saturday, January 15, of the handsome buildings 
>f the California School of Fine Arts. 

Built upon the Spanish type of architecture, the building, 
•r series of buildings, comprising units of a magnificent 
omposite structure, command a place of prominence on 
he hills overlooking San Francisco Bay and the famous 
istrict of Telegraph Hill where artists of world renown 
ave long received their inspirations. 

The patio in the center of which is a fountain is fascin- 
tinglv attractive. Musicians played on their stringed in- 
truments and bouquets of marigolds were scattered about 
he fountain and lay on the water, while both sunshine and 
ain did their best to ascribe "welcome" to visitors and to 
aint Nature's beauties across the skies, last Saturday, on 
he notable occasion of the formal reception and the open- 
:ig of the art school. 
Seautiful Location 

While the buildings of the new California School of 
■tie Arts are well worth the encomiums the press and the 
fiblic in general have used in describing the place, Nature 
erself, lent special charms on Saturday's opening day. 

Those of us who ascended to the tower of the red stone 
tructure, with its picturesque background of the famous 
^atin Quarter, saw a vision we shall remember! 

It had just rained — in sprinkles. Then, the sun came out 
nd across the sky just above the Golden ( late was traced 

glorious rainbow. It was so beautiful that a hushed si- 
snee fell over the throngs, high up in that tower, as we 
Bitched the rainbow until it became a part of the land- 
cape. 
Jine Hundred Students 

Nine hundred students are enrolled in the Art School. 
diich had its beginning with a small handful of enthusias- 
ic artists who long ago visualized what we are now priv- 
.eged to behold — a magnificent building topping the hills 
I San Francisco. 
'rominent Speakers 

Former Senator James D. l'helan addressed the people 
Ithered in the library of the California School of Fine 
Vrts on the event of its formal opening. Senator Phelan 
Balled the history of the school, saying in part: 

"Paris has become the center of distribution for il 
rtistic, because Paris has always fostered and encouraged 
i artists. San Francisco, by doing the same thing, can 
ommand a place for itself in the world of ail because oi 

is aii production and because "> the work of its artists, 

heir distinctive work and their standards." 

1".. Spencer Mackav. dean ><\ the faculty, and a member 
I the board of directors; Edgar Walters, also a member 
I the board, addressed the assembly tracing the develop- 
lent of the Art School. 

Walters referred to the first significant milestone in the 
istoiw of the \rt Sell iol -making special note of the gilt 
f Edward F. Searles, which enabled the school practically 
ier-night to become the Mark Hopkins Institute of Art lo- 
tted on Nob I [ill. 

Mir Walters Collection, a group of paintings by repre- 
entativc California and other American artists, attracted 
fcsiderable attention and high commendation at the open- 
ig of the school. 
Greeting Board 

Walter Martin is president of the board of directors. 
tm pie ton Crocker, lames D. Phelan, Arthur Brown, Jr.. 
twrence Scott. John 1. Walter. Spencer Mackay, Guittardo 
ni, Lucien I. ahaudt. P. I. B. Tufts and Edgar Walt- 
IB are member- of the board. 



Writers, artists, musicians, composers and many from 
the whirl of society were in coteries which gathered at the 
auspicious opening of the California School of Arts to pay 
their tribute and to voice their enthusiastic espousal anil 

support of this new sign of San Francisco's progress as a 
city of dreams-fulfilled. 

Now — the Opera House 

"Now, if we can only have our new opera house," said 
Anna Cora Winchell, the scholarly writer known through- 
out California and the entire West for her reviews in many 
fields of art. "If we only have our opera house, San Fran- 
cisco can be what it is aiming to be," she added, with en- 
thusiasm — '"the art center of western America." 

Our Opera House — Maybe it won't be so long, after all, 
before we shall have what Miss Winchell desired and ex- 
pressed so ardently and so well! 




Tel. Davenport 4980 

655 SACRAMENTO ST. 

Between Montgomery and 

Kearny Streets 

San Francisco, Calif. 




RARE BOOKS 

EARLY EDITIONS 

Autographs Bought and Sold 
JOHN HOWELL 

434 Post Srnirr, San Francuco, Calif. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDERS 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ONLY 

y /h6sUfea£ Shirts IhosEJ&nf 

^m^ »»*£- wf 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th Su„ 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



18 



THE SAN FRAXCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 1? 




Not All Brave Deeds 
"Not all brave deeds are done in war. 

Not every hero wears the bay ; 
There's many a hidden wound and scar 

That never sees the light of day. 

"There's many a simple son of toil 

Who rests not till his strength is gone ; 

There's many a daughter of the soil — 
'A woman's work is never done !' 

"In slum and suburb, church and mart. 

In hospital, at bench and bar. 
'Mid cloistered groves in realms of art — 

There our unhonored heroes are. 

"Wise men and foolish, sinners, saints. 

Gods of this world and worlds afar: 
Their courage falters not nor faints. 

Not all brave deeds are done in war." 

— Edwin Pugh, in the "Observer.' 




LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 
Post and Frnnklin Streets San Francisco, Cnllf. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

have: your cars washed and greased 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates: 35c per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors tor Service and Storage of Automobile* 



The Man Who's on the Job 
For the ones who've reached the ladder's top. 

There's much in prose and rime; 
But there's little said for those 

Who still are on the climb. 

While the hills resound with praises 
For the men who've passed away, 

Many heroes stand unnoticed 
In the battles of today. 

It is right that we should cherish 

Those who've borne the battle's brunt — 
Place all failures in the background 

And all honours to the front. 

But so many are forgetful. 

As they join the cheering mob, 
That they ought to be a-boosting 

For the man who's on the job. 

— Selected. 



The Automobile Show 

A week from today at 10 o'clock a. m., the eleventh An- 
nual Pacific Automobile Show will be opened at the Civic 
Auditorium. All this last week automobile dealers and fac- 
tory representatives have been working at high pressure 
looking after the many details that go towards making 
such an undertaking a success. Many of the exhibits will 
be exact duplicates of the New York displays. 

Perhaps the most interesting new feature in motordom 
is the "figurehead" which some manufacturers of the best 
types of cars are adding to their radiator caps. It is a 
return to the fanciful and often quite beautiful emblems 
which graced the bows of sailing vessels, in the "Clipper" 
ship days, and to our mind it is an echo of a very lovely old 
custom. No doubt this fashion will grow more and more 
popular, and automobilists will have figureheads typifying 
the various good qualities of their cars as radiator emblems. 
One superior make of cars has already chosen a small 
statue of "Atlanta" as symbolical of speed. 



Graystone 130 

SHERWOOD 



Open Day ao4 Night 

GARAGE 



Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specially 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 

Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 

Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing:, Oiling, Greasing:, AVashtng: and Polishing; 
Gasoline t Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4200 



Metal Work Apper- 
tnlninfr to Automo- 
biles— Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Black- 
smithing. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



In addition to our Modern Equipment, we have more j 
Hand Ironing Experts than most laundries. ! 



La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



I 250 T 



25(1 Twelfth St., San Francisco 



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'Phone Market 916 



Inuary 22, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
Notional Automobile Club 

EL CAMINO REAL was the first of 
the great arteries of travel in Cali- 
fornia, the second was the Pacific 
Highway that leads to Shasta and to 
< Iregon, the third was the I [ighway of 
the Giants that passes through the red- 
wood aisles of the northern coast. 
* * * 

The fourth great highway of Cali- 
fornia leads the traveler to the fervid 
heat of the Mojavc Desert through the 
rich irrigated lands of the San Joaquin 
Bailey, through vineyard -um\ orchard 
and farm by rolling hills where the 
black-towered derricks are bringing 

the liquid gold from the earth to the 

crest of the bleak mountain divide that 
separate's the summer-lands of south- 
ern California from the great valley of 
the north. 

From this fourth great highway of 
California may he \isited the highest 
peak in continental United Stale-. Ml. 

Whitney: the Owens River district, 
paradise of the hunter ami the angler; 
the Devil's Post Tile Monument. 
Strange freak of Nature's prehistoric 
sculpture; and the sand-stone carvings 
of Red Rock Canyon, a veritable mu- 
seum of Nature's fantastic handiwork. 

1 I ere, too, is the -atew a \ to I Vath Val- 

lc\ through which the Manl\ expedi- 
tion in 1841 toiled in quest of a south- 
ern route o\ er the Sierra. 

i Mice over the ridge that tonus the 
harrier between the north and the south 
and the traveler looks down upon the 
orange groves and fertile valleys that 
abound in the great metropolis of Los 
Angeles. From this point radiate hun- 
dreds of paved highways into pleasant 
Canvons and through rich fields de- 



voted to agriculture and orchards that 
yield fabulous returns. Here are high- 
ways that lead to the ocean beaches, 
the playgrounds of the south, and 
through the mountain chains that form 
the harrier between the fertile lands of 
the coast and the reclaimed stretches 
of the Imperial Valley. 

Travel over any of the highways of 
California and yours will be an enjoy- 
ment which cannot be derived by any 
other district in the world. 

The first road building' on the Am- 
erican continent was done by the Az- 
tecs. In Mexico and Peru are to be 
found the remains of many of these 
ancient arteries of travel. Many of 
these roads were cut for miles in the 
living rock while rivers were spanned 
by bridges suspended across yawning 
gorges. 

One road in Peru, which dates back 
to the time of Rome, is some two thou- 
sand miles in length and has at inter- 
vals along the route stone pillars with 
directions for the traveler and mileage 
tables to indicate the distance between 
the various cities enroute. 
* * * 

The modern highway owes a great 
deal to the ungainly bicycle of the SO's. 
In those days when the front wheel 
measured some five feet in diameter 
the stability of the wheel was not very 
great. I leaders were common and 
mounting was difficult. To overcome 
these difficulties of the ordinary bi- 
cycle, the so-called safety was devel- 
oped in 1885 in which the pedals were 
carried on a separate shaft and the 
power was transmitted by chain and 
spn ickel to the rear wheel. 

Then came the development of the 
pneumatic tire and the demand for 

smoother surfaced roads for the use 

of the vehicle. The craze of cycling 
rea< hed its height in the late 90's in the 
United States ami Clubs of Wheelmen 
were organized in almost every state 
in the union. Their main aim was the 
improvement of roads ami the invest- 
ment in highway construction elated 
from this campaign which was launched 
hv the Wheelmen of the 90's. 

It was not long until the automobile 
look up the work of propaganda and 
from 1896 to the present day. hardly 
a month has gone by without the 
launching of propaganda in the inter- 
ests of thi no\ ement. 

Golden Gate 

Two big headliners in vaudeville will 
divide top-line honors on a Centennial 
Year hill scheduled to open with Satur- 
day's matinee at the Golden Gate. 
They are Aileen Stanley, the Victrola 
Girl, known to thousands through her 
vaudeville engagements and many 
phonograph records, and Jack Nor- 
worth and Dorothy Vdelphi, in a coin- 
ed] sketch, "The Nigger." 



Employees help 



To be of greater ser- 
vice and — serve well — 
is the desire of every 
Pacific Service em- 
ployee. 



PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"FACjriC 9CBVICE* 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

l.MXl.OOO cap* were »erve«i at the 

Pannnia-PacIftV International Exposition 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, 19271 



•^fJMf 



■J** 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



""SKs' 



-«.' 




Julian D. Harries, 

Newly-elected 

Potentate 

of 

Islam Temple. 



JULIAN D. HARRIES, explorer, big game hunter, globe 
trotter, professor of languages, leader of the British 
Forces during the Boer War in South Africa, all round good 
fellow, but best of all, the newly elected Potentate of Is- 
lam Temple, has taken over that office, which has been so 
capably managed by Ernest L. West during the past year. 
Harries, like his predecessors, Hugh King McKevitt, 
Billy Worden, and Ernest West, has thrown his hat in the 
ring and hopes to carry on the good work during his term 
of office. Julian is in the insurance business, and will fix 
you up against life, accident, or divorce. 

Like all his predecessors, also, Harries is anxious to 
carry out all the big problems that are on the calendar, and 
is particularly interested in the crippled children's work, 
which has been so admirably handled by the Shriners. 

Our new Pote is going to make a model leader because 
he has had a world of experience both at home and abroad. 
He is a masterful talker, a real William Jennings Bryan. 

His flow of language keeps one spell-bound whenever 
he is in command. 



The Pote Aspires To Be Champ 

Like Ira Coburn, Hugh King McKevitt, Billy Worden 
and many other past potentates, Julian Harries aspires to be 
as great a golfer as his successors. Ira Coburn is a builder 
by profession, but he is also a builder of our future greats 
in the public schools. Ira is perhaps the busiest man in 
town, for what with helping to make San Francisco the me- 
tropolis of the West, he spends much of his time on the 
Board of Education, and during his spare moments he de- 
lights to visit Lakeside and play a round of golf. 

Hugh McKevitt, the big attorney, and his pal Tack Hous- 
ton, publisher of the Masonic World, are a couple of King- 
pins among the mashie wielders at the Olympic Club, 
never missing a week-end without playing both courses. 

Perhaps there are no two nobles that get more keen en- 
joyment out of a game of golf than Hugh and lack; they 
play for pleasure, not according to Hoyle. 



Julian Harries 

The newly elected Potentate of Islam Temple, A. A. ( >. 
N. M. S., is widely known among the Masonic fraternity. 
He is a member of Mission Lodge, No. 169; Mill Valley 
Chapter, No. 108, R. A. M.; California Council. No. 2, 
R. ec S. M.; San Francisco Commandery, No. 41, Knights 
Templar, of which lie is a Past Commander; the Ancient 
and Accepted Order of Sciots. in which order he is a Su- 
preme officer. In addition to this formidable list, he is 
a Past Patron of Ivy Chapter, No. 27 ', Order of the Easterfl 
Star and a member of the California Crevs. 

Julian has had quite an adventurous career. In Iris 
younger days he roamed the world seeking adventure and 
found it. Prior to the Boer War in South Africa he hunted 
big game in the interior. During the war he acted as inter- 
preter to the British Forces, speaking Dutch and Zulu flu- 
ently. Higher rank was offered him, conditional upon sac- 
rificing his American citizenship. Needless to say, Julian 
indignantly refused. 

He has the distinction of being one of those few favorefl 
mortals who have been sentenced to lie hung and escaped 
the noose. This followed the historic Jameson raid, in 
which he took an active part. Later he served for several 
years as an officer in the British South African Mounted 
Police, a picked body of men with a world-wide reputation! 
Julian is an apostle of good cheer. He should be dubbed 
"Sunny;" for he spreads sunshine all around. Ik- lias a 
wonderful personality and bids fair to be one of Islam's 
most popular potentates. 



The only time Billy Worden takes a crack at the little 
apple is when the Shriners pay a visit to Del Monte for 
their high jinks. 

Bill forgets business for a few days and matches wits 
with the Fire Commissioner, 
Frank Sykes, or Fred Hilmer, 
the big butter and egg man 
from the West. Naturally our 
big pote Julian is anxious to cut 
as big a figure on the green- 
sward as any of the other 
Nobles. 

Julian is looking forward to 
the Shrine high jinks at Del 
Monte in May, which is one of 
the feature sporting events on 
the annual roster.' To make 
sure that there will be the us- 
ual punch in their sports out- 
ing, Julian has pursuaded 
Noble Bill Woodfield to act as 
sport;, director for another 
term. 

Noble Bill, as you all know, 
was responsible tor the splendid program put on last vear 
tinder the Ernest West regime and he made such a won- 
derful success of it that every Noble was strong for Bill 
to lend his valuable services for another term. 

Noble Bill put over M>me wonderful programs last vear. 
but he claims he's got a lot of surprises for the next meet. 




"Uill" Woodfltlil, 

the efficient chairman of the 

Shrlncrg' Siiortg Committee 



1927 



THE SAN FRANK [SCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



LIBRARY TABLE 

By Eleanore F. Ross 

Fremont Older Tells His "Own Story" 

That Fremont Older, formerly editor of the S. F. "Bulle- 
tin" was, at one time, a great power in the political system 
of San Francisco, no one can deny, who has any knowledge 
of the graft prosecution of the nineties; nor that he had the 
coinage of his convictions, for it took moral and physical 
bravery to stand out against the combined forces of corrupt 
politicians and the moneyed interests backing- them ; but 
that he proved himself guilty of the very crime which he 
was fighting (that of bribery) he admits in comparatively 
every chapter of his new book, "My Own Story." 

Reformers may find pardon for this in the fact that Older 
was sincerely striving to rid the city of graft; they may 
say that his motives were good, though his methods fol- 
lowed closely the tricks and maneuvers of the factions he 
was bucking, but the ordinary reader, who has never been 
bitten by that trouble-making little gnat — reform — bemused 
and befuddled after perusing page after page dealing with 
the handling of large sums of money to make puppets of 
men — slaves to the bidding of the master who pulled the 
strings, — finishes the bulky volume in a state of bewilder- 
ment bordering on collapse, as to who are the criminals 
and who the reformers. 

The manner in which Older carried on his persecution of 
nchmitz and Kuef. with the aid of the "Bulletin," private 
capital and the Burns detective agency; his ousting of the 
district attorney to put his own "henchman" in ; the in- 
dictment of Schmitz ; the ridiculous situation of a city which 
ran itself for days without a chief executive; the search for 
a mayor who was neutral enough to keep silent in the midst 
of this political pandemonium, found in the person of the 
poet, Robson Taylor; Ruef's ultimate incarceration in the 
penitentiary, the one poor little scape-goat who was forced 
to take upon his shoulders all the burden of crimes of a 
whole army of evil doers; and < llder's final repcnlcnce of bis 
own manipulations of the city's government to "get" tin- 
men whom lie looked upon as grafters; all this i- told in 
a straightforward, Honest-to-God fashion; well construc- 
ted, but with absolutely no attempt at "style"; no concession 
to a little persiflage to render it more readable and lis- like 
a Congressional Record. 

In < (filer's address to the Council of lewish Women, 
after he bad finally succeeded in securing Ruef's parole, he 
lives the whole story of the graft prosecution concisely and 
Beady, admitting his mistakes, his weaknesses, bis bit- 
prness toward those whom be bad considered evil doer-. 
In one paragraph alone, he sums up cit) government as it 
was in the old days, as it is today: 

"(If course, nothing was happening then that had not 
happened before, and is still happening m all cit) govern- 
ments. The administration was responding to privilege. 
That i>. the powerful corporations and the powerful proper- 
ty owners were asking and demanding an advantage over 
the ma-- of the community." 

"There was nothing new about it," he sav s further; "but 
Bchmitz and Kuef went a little further, perhaps, ami were 
a little more picturesque and more open in bestowing priv- 
ilege- than the community had been accustomed to." 

It- a hook worth reading, for it reveals a condition ol 
civic affairs that i- positively appalling to the layman, the 
■good" citizen who i- prone to refer with pride to "my city." 

Its author must be an honest chronicler; he must be able 
to prove ever} statement he has made; otherwise he would 
ted with a bunch u\ libel suits heav\ enough to 
knock him off bis feet; but the very truthfulness of the 
deplorable matter constitute- the worst commentary 
on the machination- of graft over civic jurisdiction that has. 
surelv. ever been written. 



GOLF 
(Continued from Page 20) 

William H. Woodfield, Jr. 

Noble "Bill" Woodfield, Chairman of the (loli Com- 
mittee of Islam Temple of the Shrine and member of the 
Divan, is a real sportsman in every sense of the word. A 
true native son, being born and raised in San Francisco, 
"Bill" is a member of California Lodge, No. 1 and Cali- 
fornia Commandery, No. 1, Knights Templar. He is one of 
the best known real estate men in the City and, in addition 
to his many other activities, has been appointed Chairman 
of the "New Building Committee" of Islam Temple. This 
Committee is charged with the task of locating a site for 
the wonderful $4,000,000 Temple that the local Shrine pro- 
poses to build some time in the future. 



Dinner at Occidental Hotel, Santa Rosa 

Miss Catherine Coghill, of the Bayview Apartments, 
this city, was guest of honor at a very enjoyable duck din- 
ner given recently by Joseph Rossi, at the Occidental Hotel 
in Santa Rosa, where Miss Coghill has been visiting friends. 
She is the great granddaughter of Judge J. A. Stanley, who 
owned the first vineyard in northern California. Judge 
Stanley made a special trip to Europe to select a number of 
vines which he considered the best adapted to this cli- 
mate, and was looked upon as an authority in his time, in 
regard to horticulture. 

Sprucing Up 
"Our museum has acquired a new Rembrandt!" 
"About time. too. The other one was getting very old." 
— Ulk (Berlin). 

*chief 

Neur^wflmin 

o/LUXURY 

Caters to those who want the very 
best in travel and who are will- 
ing to pay a little more for it. 

Just like buying a diamond or a 
motor car -quality counts. 

The Chief marks a new 
era in transcontinental 
service. 

Extra fare? Yes. But also extra 
fast and extra fine. 
Santa Fe Ticket Offices & Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street Telephone Sutter 7600 Ferry Depot 

SAN FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND IIKHKI'.l I v SACRAMENTO -\\l\ H<>* V 

ill l::th "I. nM 1 nlM-r-li. \.r. MMx; K -l. r.lii I ..iirth St. 

- \\ JOSE STOCKTOJi 

ir.Kn.l *„nfn < Inrn -I. --t rir-t Nntloiml flank Hide. 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 22, VJ27 



4*M*» 




lEIfrj^iiJj; 



T N h a e me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



PHONES! 
San Francisco — 
West 793 



Burlingame 

478 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAICERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

209 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco. Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



875 r'OLSOM ST. 818 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 14) 
Royal 

"I Ither Women's Husbands" with 
Monte Blue and Marie Prevost the 
stars will be shown at the Royal the- 
ater Sunday. Then comes Mary Pick- 
ford in "Sparrows," occupying- the 
screen Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day of next week. This is one of Mary 
Pickford's latest and regarded by many 
as one of her loveliest pictures. 

Milton Sills in "Men of Steel" with 
Doris ' Kenyon playing opposite will 
be screened Thursday and Friday with 
an actual steel mill shown in full op- 
eration. 

Young People's Symphony Concert 
That local society is interested in 
the musical appreciation of the sub- 
sub-deb set. with an eye to future en- 
joyment of good music of the most ma- 
ture type, is evidenced by the number 
of the smart set who will entertain par- 
ties of young people at the coming 
series of Young People's Symphony 
Concerts, the first of which will take 
place on next Friday afternoon at the 
Columbia Theater, under the baton of 
Wheeler Beckett. Headed by Mrs. 
Leon Guggenhime as chairman, the 
patronesses include — Mesdames Walt- 
er Arnstein, A. B. C. Dohrmann, Ira 
Bogan Jr., M. A. Gunst, Walter Haas. 
Frank King, Rlilton Lennon, J. J. 
Mack. M. C. Sloss, George Fuller 

News From Santa Cruz 
The condition of the Coast Road to 
Santa Cruz from San Francisco is de- 
scribed as "good" by parties who have 
recently arrived here via the ocean 
route. As the dirt portions of the road 
suffer from heavy rains it is always ad- 
visable for motorists to secure last min- 
ute information as to its condition dur- 
ing wet weather. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
THE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 

location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 18th day 
of January, 11*27. an assessment of one-half 
cent per share was levied upon the issued 
capital stuck of the corporation payable im- 
mediately in legal money of the United States, 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 
Room 245, Monadnock Building, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 24th day of February, 
i!>27 will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on Thursday the 
24th day of March, 1927 to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing anri expense of sale. 

M. .1. SEELY, Secretary, 
245 Monadnock Building. 
San Francisco. Calif. 

twill, MEETING 
THE JOSH! \ HEN 1)1 IKON WORKS 

Tlie regular annual meeting or the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be loii! at the office of the corporation. X,.. 
7". Fremont Street, San Francisco, California, 
on Tuesday, the 8th day or February, 1927, at 

i" ii of le o'clock a. m., for the purpose 

of i lecting a Board of Directors to serve tor' 
the i nsuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meet- 
ing. 

('HAS, C. GARDNER, 

Secretary. 
ifflce: in Fremont Street, 
San Francisco. California. 




PHONE 

CRAYSTONE 240 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNiGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Office and Works 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 
Branch Office: 700 Sutter Street 

IHotel Canterbury Bide.) 
Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Where Good Tailoring 
Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal, 
Sport and Business wear is now 
ready for tour early considera- 
tion. 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
opp. olympic club 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfield 3852 MJ-4 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoininci Wilkes and Curran Theaterj 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^. 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




ICE CREAf% 
CANDY 
PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 

polk t california sts.i luncheon 

jioo 'jio"* im IPINN E :>? 








Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00, $1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 

headquarters for theatrical people 

Hattds Mooseh Minnie C. Moosun 



t^teanorS 



I4B Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast, 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to i p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms Tor banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



O'Ferrell end 
1 .r«in St.. 



Weekday!, Luncheon 

(11 JO to 2 p. re.) 
Dinner. Week Dart and Sander* 



BLANCO'S 

.$ .75 



Phone 

Gray. lone 8100 



No Visitor Should Lea re the Cily With- 
out Oin.ne in the Finest Cafe 
1-50 in America 



Our Main Dining Room it open again on Sundays, 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

BS Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
i 10 p. m, to 1:30 p. m 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVER! MONDAY 
Half Block from Highway 




Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open uk) a. m. to 11. -so p. m. 

unsurpassed cuisine 

Carl Leonhabdt 

f ormerK of Golden Cale Park Catino 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIP. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 



-1 i- 



Clean Rooma, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Ratal Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Peck-Judab 



v^ALilEsIN It V 1L.L.A. CARL STEFFEN . p BO p 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at tho Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Street— Garfield S44 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Buildinc, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a visrnroua brushing ence or twice a day la 
taking; very good care of them. Brushing Is only a part of the 
process. Many Thine* can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dentist can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble; do not wait for the ache. Watch yoor teeth and arums. 
There are Bum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are your teeth soref Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking «y«- 
tem blocks off all nervca and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield BK 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions: Crowns; Self Cleaning- Brtdsres: 

Porcelain Work and Rootle*. Plates 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Service in the Tropica 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
leven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and historic porta — Man- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Libertad. Salvador; Corinto, 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Even- cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one: each has an electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swimming tank. The Panama Mail is 
world-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meals on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as little as $350. (This price does not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days. Next 
sailings from San Francisco: SS ECUADOR. Januarv 22: SS COLOMBIA, February 
19. From Los Angeles two davs later. Westward from New York: SS COLOMBIA. 
January 15; SS VENEZUELA. February 5. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ash any steamship 
or ticket agent or xerite to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 



548 S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 



DISTINCTION! 



LMliffil: 



Perfect- COM FQ RJ! 



With 



ECONOMY! 



These three features com- 
bined with many other attrao 
tions, including excellent meals, 
form a combination of hotel 
service difficult to equal. 



Make your next 
stay at the 
famous 



RATES 

Per Day 
slnsle 
European Plan 




120 rooms with runninff 
water $2.50lo$4.00 
220 rooms with bath 

3. SO to 5.00 
160 rooms with bath 

6.00 to 8.00 
Double. 4.00 up 



Also a number of lame and beautiful room* t>nd 
■uiiix- some in period furnishings with grand pi. 
e place and bath, $ tO up. 




Large and well equipped 
Sample Rooms 



RAMCHO GOLP CLUB 
available to all guests 



HAROLD E. LATHROP 




ROLLS-ROYCE 



Direct Branches: 
San Francisco Los Angeles 

461 Post St. 3136 Wilshire Blvd. 




"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point 4 — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 



rAL,iri^ auiu anuw January 29th to February 5th Inclusive 




#5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



Saturday January 29, 1927 ^-^ 07f^5^§ AN GELES 




San Francisco Gets Its First Look at 

The Magnificent New 

CHANDLER 

ROYAL EIGHT 
At the Auto Show— January 29th. to February 5th. 

Tilt: ( HANOI EB-I I I Ml \M> MOTORS CORPORATION CLEVELAND 

CHANDLER -CLEVELAND MOTOR CAR CO. 

\ .in Ness .ii Sacramento— Graystone 6700 

Louis Cohen, Associate Dealer, W47 Mission St,— Graystone 6700 
Hebraok, Hunter & Peacock *"<■.. 3435 Broadway. Oakland 

OPEN SUNDAYS AND EVENINGS 




SerVel 



SMeans-^ 

SERVES ELECTRICALLY 

Why Necessary 

1st Electrical Refrigeration is recog- 
nized as efficient, constant and 
sanitary. 

2nd Food preservation is as necessary 
in winter as in summer. 

3rd It is more economical than ice and 
gives a constant temperature. 

4th Make your ICE AT HOME. 

5th No worry or inconvenience with 



PERFECT 




REFRIGERATION 



Name 

Address 

City 

SERVEL CORPORATK >\ 

1740 Van Ness Ave., San Frani is< o, Calif. 
i Iraystone 1730 



SEND FOR A SERVEL COLDERY 

i u1 out this coupon, mail to us and we will forward 
tn you without any obligation on your part our receipt 
book of menus for frozen foods and appetizers. 




Established July 20, 1856 

saN F££gici8 Co 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

me San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S5G, bv Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

r., from 1SS4 to 1825. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 26S Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

'elephone Kearny 8357. Entered at .San Francisco, California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including- postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



ol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., JANUARY 29, 1927 



THE AUTO SHOW 



By E. V. WELLER 



THE twenty-seventh annual National Automobile Show in New York broke all records lor attendance. Public interest 
was greater than ever before, dealers were more enthusiastic and the manufacturers had many a surprise in store for 
:he motor car buyers. 

These surprises, and tliev range from refinements in design and brilliant combinations of color to new mechanical 
'eatures that make the operation of an automobile easier and more dependable, are revealed before the eyes of the mo- 
orist at the annual Pacific Automobile Show in the Civic Auditorium at San Francisco, January 29-February 5: 

The Automobile Show is one of the great educational exhibits of the year. Its chief interest may lie for the 
Ryer and salesman, but it is important as a spectacle of beauty and as a monument to the advance in engineering. It 
is indeed a displav that illustrates the advance in civilization and the efficiency of the American engineer. In the 
Bow this year there were no wild departures in coach design, but refinements in comfort that contribute to the luxury 
jf riding in a motor car were much in evidence. 

You will find the motor car today able to go farther on less fuel; able to climb a hill with less effort; able to travel 
at high speeds with a minimum of vibration, and, all in all, more perfected in a mechanical way than its predecessors 
if the Shows that have gone before. 

The State Motor Vehicle Department anticipates a registration in California of approximately 1.750.000 cars, a 
healthy increase over the preceding twelvemonth period. This is enough to make any optimist beam forth his belief 
in prosperity for the twelvemonth to come. 

The observer at the show is confronted by a few very interesting conclusions, one of which is a bit shopworn. 
It's a bromide, nowadays, to remark on the prevalence of the closed car model, but it is very much in evidence at the 
1927 Show. More so than it was last year. The motorist of today keeps his weather eye open— in a closed job. An- 
other observation is that a great main- motorists know a little something about what makes the car go and what makes 
it stop. A point in engineering design on (he inside of the car may sell a prospective purchaser where a few years ago 
the inside of the car was a mysten to the buyer and for that matter to the salesman and to the dealer as well. 

The whole family will be tickled pink with the gorgeousness of the vehicles and the colorful netting. Matron ami 
maid will sigh over the luxurious limousine with its mirrors and powder puffs and its cute little thing-um-a-gigs 
for milad\ who smokes. The business man will disguise his eagerness under a frown and look wisely over the engine 
and the bod\ construction the while he hearkens and nods now and then to the palaver of the salesman. The col- 
lege youth and his lad) will drink heav) draughts of jo} a- they inspect tlu- cut-a-w ay roadster with the loud stripes 
Wile many an anxious parent will have his hands full in keeping the children away from the horn button, 
gorge of beaut v and if wishes were automobiles even one of the hundred and one cars on the fl. 
m the first da\ of the exhibit. 

Interest in thing- mechanical is more alive than ever. The cut-out chasses, the lecture rooms, the skeletons that 
non-lit out the anatomical peculiarities of tin- car and that are a continual attraction. There i- something almost 
morbid in the vva\ the spectators crowd around to see the poor vehicles dissected. One dealer ha- sawn one of his cars 
.amipletcly in halt and the poor thing seems to be continually craning it- neck about the Auditorium in search of the 
rest of its anatomx 

There wa- a goodly percentage of the crowd on hand to see the busses ami tractor-, truck- ami trailer-. The vision 
I the motorized world of the future is incomplete without including this phase of the exhibit. That's how the young 
Bpeful who lives out in the country will be enjoying the advantages of first-class schooling; that's how the great en- 
gineering projects of the state will be rushed to completion, that's how a great many of us will be traveling from 
place to' place in the near future, -these are important factors in the transportation of the world. 

Then the accessories will attract a great throng There are hundreds of things on display in this section that 
nakc motoring more comfortable and more sale. There arc moving exhibits, wrenches that know every bolt and nut 
>v name and boms with organ voices that play excellent jazz. 

The Automobile Show of 1927 will go into the record- as one of the most successful exhibits ever held. The 
Irtomobiles that are all shined up for the Show, will soon be skimming up and down the highways ot California in ans- 
wer to the call of the open road. Spring is just around the corner and this year will set a new record tor automobile 
tra\el in California. 



It is a grand 
■r would be driven away 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



29, 19a 




( lur campaigns, which always 
Governmental Interference go on in these columns, against 

the persistent interference of 
the government in the affairs of the individuals have re- 
cti ed quite strong- support from no less a source than 
Senator Borah. He has gone on record in a very able speech 
against the constant invasion by the government of the 
sphere of individual enterprise. It is unnecessary for us to 
say that we are in entire accord with him. This is all the 
more notable in that we often find ourselves very much 
at odds with the famous statesman. 

Unless there is a halt, says the Senator, the government 
will find itself primarily an institution for spying upon the 
citizens of the country and will become that most despicable 
and least hopeful. of all forms of government, a bureaucracy. 
One can di> nothing with a bureaucracy. The group or- 
ganization which it implies is impervious to criticism and 
there is a lack of personal responsibility which makes the 
fixing- of blame practically impossible. 

Step by step the development has gone along until we 
fancy, at least, that the bureaucracy which Senator Borah 
so much dreads is with us already and that already we are 
beginning to find ourselves ridden by a group which does 
not hesitate to employ espionage upon citizens engaged in 
lawful business and to violate the law wherever it wishes to 
lay its hands upon some one who has given it offense. The 
administration of Acts like the Volstead Act has been no- 
torious for bureaucratic abuses, which would have been 
quite in place- in the Russia of the Tsaristic rule but which 
are in no ways appropriate to the government of a people 
like our own. We are with Senator Borah, but we fear 
that he is talking a little late. 



When we come to sift the Nicara- 
The President is Right guan and Mexican matters to their 
foundations we find that the main 
question and indeed, as far as this country is concerned, the 
only question, involved, is the fundamental matter of the 
protection of the property of our nationals abroad. 

Is a civilized government obliged to protect the property 
of its nationals who have invested in good faith abroad? 
This may be met by the further question — are such in vest- 
ments legitimately made under treaty between the govern- 
ment of the country of the nationals investing, and the 
country in which they have invested ? 

If, as matter of fact, investments have been made abroad 
under treaty rights with a foreign country, there cannot 
be the least doubt that it is the duty of he United States 
to protect its nationals in their investments. As the Presi- 
dent says, the United States cannot afford to allow the con- 
fiscation of the property of its nationals. 

It could not be otherwise. What would be the use i if 
paying taxes and belonging to a country if that country 
will not in times of emergency defend your life and your 
property rights, abroad as well as at home? So there is no 
question at all about the President being absolutely right in 
his attitude with respect to the investments of Americans 
in these countries and it is his duty to use the forces of the 
United States if necessary, to protect the property of the 
nationals of this country who have invested their money 
abroad and have acquired property rights under treaty. 



This, therefore, as the President truly says, is not a matter 
which is capable of arbitration. No country can afford to I 
arbitrate the essential question of the protection due to its j 
nationals abroad. All that remains, then, is the question as I 
to whether American property rights have actually been I 
violated. 



( )ne of the most striking things m 
American Amusements late is the unanimity with which 
the reformers of Europe are fall- 
ing upon the way in which we have learned to spend our 
leisure and more particularly those special forms of dancing 
which have sprung up in the cabarets and night clubs of 
this country. 

The Russian government lias forbidden the dancing of 
the Charleston and has made it an offense under the police 
laws to make a public exhibition of the dance. We have no 
doubt that what the government bans in public is indulged 
in private and that Russian youths and maidens, if they 
have any privacy, take an extraordinary pleasure in foot- 
ing the forbidden measure. But the altitude of the gov- 
ernment is unmistakable; it regards the Charleston as im- 
moral and not fit for an earnest working people. 

Now comes Mussolini, with the same idea more forcibly 
expressed. He has issued an order which bans the Charles- 
ton, the Black Bottom, other dances of a like character and 
even jazz. He is engaged in the moral invigoration and 
rejuvenation of his people and pretends to find in these 
dances a merely vicious tendency which can not but hurt the 
morals of the society over which he presides. 

Here, we have a strange phenomenon, — that a people 
which has hitherto borne a reputation for almost prudish 
puritanism has in a very short space of time, arrived at 
the point where its amusements are banned by folk, like the! 
Russians and the Italians, who have hitherto, at least. 
shown no tendency towards that puritanism of conduct 
which has up to now been regarded as our almost Messianic 
rede. 

It would be interesting to discover just bow it happened 
that we, of all people, should have come into the possession 
of these particular expressions of physical abandon. 






So far the new Governor is making 
The New Governor good. There is a very good tone aboffl 
the administration ; a tone which is, at 
one and the same time, quiet and confident. A sensitive ob- 
server will note that there is an absence of amateurism about 
the present government. The way in which it tackles the 
various matters with which it is brought into contact has 
a masterly feel about it. There is an absence of the Western 
cowboyish, almost infantile bravado, which has too often 
marred our Sacramento politics. It might be said with 
truth that the hand of the expert is being manifested, and 
that we shall have a government of a professionally high 
grade. 

Of course, professionalism has its drawbacks, too. < )ne 
can get too far from the people and a touch of highbrowisfl 
will do more harm in the long run than a great deal of vul 
garity, for after all people do forgive vulgarity, but intel 
lectual superiority is one thing to which they can nevei 
become reconciled. If this state government is in any dan- 
ger at all, it is in danger from the expert and the politiciar 
who likes to be called a "statesman." 

So far, however, the signs of such weakness are not pel 
ceptible. The Budget has been quite a triumph for tin 
Governor. It may be said, safely, that we have not had be- 
fore, a budget so well drawn and so comprehensive in it; 
terms. It provides for the financial future of the State dur 
ing the next two years, with care, and apparently with en- 
tire accuracy and embraces a surplus which should hav< 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1927 

Hie effect of doing away with those periods of money strin- 
■jney which the State government has frequently had to 

endure. 

It is true that cm the face of it the Budget is higher and 
the cost of governmental service shows an increase. But 
the population has also increased and the budget has merely 
Sept pace with that increase in population. Governor 
Young is beginning well. 

One would have thought that Tennessee 
Cackling Imbecility last year had given enough merriment 

to the world and had brought enough 
contempt upon itself to discourage any further attempts to in- 
terfere with the teaching of science in the public schools. Not 
so, however. Politics breeds fools as stagnant water breeds 
Eosquitoes, and we are no better here than anywhere else. We 
have produced our own legislative moron in the person of As- 
semblyman Helsinger of Selma, who has taken upon himself 
to introduce a bill making it a misdemeanor to teach evolution 
in the Public schools, elementary or secondary. 

The -\ssemblvman has no better sense than to object to the 
teaching of evolution upon the ground that it contradicts the 
story of the Creation as told in the Book of Genesis. That 
sounds very rural, too rural for Selma, for there are many up 
and coming people in that part of the country who would never 
endorse any such stupidity as that proposed by Mr. Helsinger. 
There are many divines, among them, notably, the Bishop 
of London, who is a scholar as well as man of affairs, and 
recently visited this city. He will not admit that there is any 
inherent contradiction 'between the Scriptures and the results 
of modern scientific investigation. 

lie that as it may, our children have the right to know the 
Best that has been found in the work of scientists and thinkers. 
There is no right on the part of the Legislature of anyone else 
to deny them access to those stores of knowledge which the race 
has accumulated. Such attempts make us appear feeble-minded 
ami ignorant and we do not care to bear any such reputation. 
Becent, progressive Cali fornians have no use for the llcl- 
singers. 

One always feels a great satis- 
The New Embarcadero Bus faction when that is accom- 
plished which has been strenu- 
ously worked for; vet it is hut human nature to feel, at the 
same time, a touch' of dissatisfaction, lor. after all. things 
never do measure up to one's expectations and the real is 
always so much more meager than the hoped-for. 
The foregoing verv commonplace reflections are forced upon 

us l>\ the opening of the bus traffic on the Embarcadero. At 
list, we are oil. for six years we have ploddingly and pains- 
takingly called the attention of the Board of Supervisors and 

evervhodv thai we could reach to the burning necessity ol bus 

traffic on the Embarcadero, The lack of it has cost millions ol 
Hollars to working people and business people alike: it has 
brought a great de.d of unnecessary trouble to well-to-do visit- 
ers and tourists and has been a source of burdensome expense 

to the poorer people who have come to our city. Hooting it 

klong the Embarcadero is nol a holiday performance, an 

oi us have been until i on obliged to hoot it. 

Now, we have a bus. But such a bus! Win should the traffic 

have been started in such a poor way? Win should not the 
needs of a transportation which is second to none in this City, 

have been mel so shamefacedly and with such a mean gesture, 
as it were' The Mayor led off the grand opening! Good old 
Mayor! We have the greatest admiration for Mayor Rolph; 
be never sbirks bis job, even under the most trying conditions, 

and we feel sure that he thought the beginning of Embarcadero 
transportation, .is permitted l'\ the Board oi Supervisors, about 
as living a job as he ever tackled. 

But. at last, we have a bus on the Emharcad. : e One! 

Lei the good work go on. Some day we may have transporta- 
tion for human beings on the Embarcadero. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



Too bad the Nicaraguan Liberals have withdrawn from 
El Bluff. It sounds like just the town for a Central Am- 
erican revolution. — New York Evening Post. 

* * * 

If a man owns an automobile it doesn't prove that he 
has money. It only proves that he had money. — El Paso 

Times. 

* * * 

Secretary Mellon speaks rather favorably of the instal- 
ment plan of buying, but we often reflect, as we open our 
mail, that probably Mr. Mellon has not had much actual ex- 
perience. — Ohio State Journal. 

* * # 

We are assured that the poison in holiday liquor is not 
instantaneous in effect. It should at least spare us until af- 
ter March 15, or how can we pay our income taxes? — Brook- 
lyn Eagle. 

Londoners are thankful that a sky-scraper like the pro- 
posed 110-story Larkin tower would be impossible in their 
town. We appreciate their feeling about this, yet no sky 
in our wide acquaintance needs scraping as much as Lon- 
don's. — The New Yorker. 

* # * 

( If course there may be no connection between the two 
incidents — but it does seem odd that the announcement of 
Mussolini's tax on Italian bachelors should have been fol- 
lowed so closely by the report of Crown Prince Humbert's 
engagement to Princess Ileana. — Life. 

* * * 

With the Navy doing the work of the State Department 
in Nicaragua, and with the Army doing the spy work for 
the Prohibition agents in New York, new courses of study 
should be prescribed at West Point and Annapolis.— New 
York Evening World. 

Maine sardine canners have voted a million dollars for 
advertising in the next three years, but not one cent for 
more commodious quarters for the sardine. — Detroit News. 

* * * 

Mme. Germaine Cassagnac-Very of Paris says 1927 
skirts will be shorter than ever. This will leave what is 
known in arithmetic as an improper fraction.— Detroit Free 

1'ress. 

* * * 

"Talking over the heads of tile people" means no more 
than an inability to talk clearly. — Publishers Syndicate. 

* * * 
\ good many people seem to think the political plum tree 

ows better after grafting.— Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. 



grow 



* * * 



( >ur big cities aren't shooting too many people. They're 
just shooting the wrong people.— El Paso Times. 

* * * 

In protecting our interests in Nicaragua, it behooves us 
also to look after our principles.— Norfolk Virginian-Pilot. 

* * * 

In this day of feminine bandits, there's no better pi 
Hon than a tame mouse in your pocket.— Austin American. 

* * * 

Mrs. Noah Identified 
"( di. Papa, can you tell me if Noah had a wife?" 
"Certainly; Joan of Arc. Don't a~k silly questions." — 
London Tit-Bits. 






THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1927 



>' 



Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore. 




By Josephine Young 



Theater Arts Club 

PLAYS of some of the country's best 
known playwrights and authors will 
be dramatized by the players of the 
Theater Arts Club Inc. in their thirty- 
third consecutive monthly perform- 
ance to be held Thursday night in the 
attractive theater auditorium of the 
\Y< mien's City Club, 465 Post Street. 

Scripts by Alice Gerstenberg, author 
of many delightful plays ; George Kel- 
ly. Wilbur Daniels Steele, and Clara 
Kummer, who penned "Rollo's Wild 
Oats" and other popular plays, will be 
produced. 

The January program for the Thurs- 
day night performances include four 
one-act vehicles: "The Buffer," Alice 
Gerstenberg; "Smarty's Party," George 
Kelly; "The Terrible Woman," Wil- 
bur Daniel Steele; and "The Robbery," 
Clare Kummer. 

One may expect much of the players 
as well as of the plays given each 
Thursday night, for direction is under 
the expert attention of Talma-Zetta 
Wilbur. 

Such excellent work has been done 
by all the players that we remind you 
just who they are: Jesse Fee, Elaine 
Forbes, Genevieve Heilmann, August 
Dellepiane, Elsie Eleanor Bassett, 
Marcella McCaw, Dorothy Howard. 
Marion E. Garthorne, G. H. Albers, 
Thelma Hudson, W. S. Lord, Dian 
D'Auber, Evelyn Hines, Edward lin- 
ger, Boyd Jenkins, Jean Potter, J. 
Clarence Myers, Dorothy Jane McCoy, 
C. Louis Hughes. 

Encourage, by your attendance, our 
local talent, especially when merit 
crowns their excelelnt efforts and their 
worth. 

"The Robbery" by Clare Kummer, 
on Thursday night, will be well worth 
your attention — we certainly believe. 

* =ii * 
Wilkes 

"Castles in the Air," a musical at- 
traction with a company of eighty, will 
be on the stage at the Wilkes theater, 
beginning with Monday night's per- 
formance, January 31. 

Announcements from the Wilkes the- 
ater tell us that the musical sensation 
coming to San Francisco will be ex- 
actly as presented for one year in Chi- 
cago and as now running in New York. 



This play is clever, hilariously funny 
and tilled to the brim with novel situa- 
tions and sparkling dialogues. 

"The Cradle Snatchers" has been 

packing the Wilkes. 

* * * 

Curran 

"What Price Glory" was a thrilling 
and striking play. As a picture the 
story becomes even more exciting" and 
stirring. 

The Curran Theater management 
has surrounded the picture with every 
possible advantage, the musical ac- 
companiments adding much to the Fox 
production with Victor McLaglen, Ed- 
mund Lowe and Dolores Del Rio in the 
leading roles. 

Ted McNamara has the important 
part of Private Kiper and Sammy Co- 
hen is the comedian in his character 
role of Lipinsky. William Y. Mong, 
Phyllis Haver, Leslie Fenton, Barry 
Norton and Elena Jurado are in the 
cast. 

* * * 

Columbia 

"Loose Ankles," with Nancy Carroll 
the star, will be the next stage attrac- 
tion at the Columbia Theater, begin- 
ning with the performances on Mon- 
day night, January 31. This is a Louis 
< ). Macloon farce rilled with musical 
melodies. It is staged by Lillian Al- 
bertson and as an extra attraction 
every performance is to have the Los 
Angeles Playhouse Symphonette < >r- 
chestra. Cecil Stewart, director. 

In the cast are: Allen Conor. Art 
Miner, Ken Brown, Kitty Moran. Mar- 
jorie Bennett. Katherine Caire Ward, 
William Raymond, Taylor Graves, 
Joda Marimoff. Jack Carrington. 

* * # 

President 

Leneta Lane, popular, vivacious and 
attractive, will appear in the role of 
"Gypsy" in the popular play, "The 
Little Spitfire" still [jacking 'em in at 
the President where the lively comedy 
on Saturday inaugurates its seventh 
week. 

Miss Lane will take the place of 
Dale Winter, who is leaving the cast 
in order to accompany Henry Duffy to 
the President Theater, in Seattle, where 
together they will begin a joint star- 
ring engagement. 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 



ON THE STAGE 



ALCAZAR 

O'Farrell Dr. Powell 



1 "The Ho 
> Geo. Coll 

J 1 



e Towners." 
linn's Comedy- 
Farce. 



COLUMBIA 

70 Eddy Street 



"Loose AnkleN" Xjmcy 

CarTOll. Starting Mori., 

.Inn. :il. 



CIIRHAN 
Geary or. Mason 



"What Price Glory,'' 
Pox produotitHi. Victor 
M c L n K' 1 e n. I : <l iii ii n (1 
Lone, Dolores Del Rio. 
Supported l>y I a rice 
east, sereen players. 
Twice daily. 2:30-8:30] 
Snnilny — :I::|0 Popular 
Concert, San l'Vooeis- 
<-i) Symphony OrcheH- 
tra, Alfred Hertz, con- 
ductor. 



PRESIDENT 
McAllister nr. Mkt. 



"The Little Spitfire," 
Henry Dun'y Comedy. 



WILKES 
Geary at Mason 



"entitles in the Air." 
Musical Comedy, lie- 
gins Monday, .Ian. 31. 



VAUDEVILLE 



GOLDEN GATE 

G. G. Ave. & Tiiylnr 



1 1 e n d 1 i n c r s : Anna 
II m i If. \ iid re Pnll O- 
dancers; \ ugoslav or- 
chestra. ..Marie Stod- 
dard. "Entertaining 
The Prince." Million 
picture: Mild. i. Mil-, |n 

"Paradise." 



ORPHEUM 

O'Farrell <& Powell 



time. Adelaide, magi- 
eian. HeadlinerM in- 
clude. Trlxle KrlKrnnxn. 
Hilly House. Jeunette 
Hnckett, First vaude- 
ville .i 1 1 pea r n n ee S. K. 
Real Estate Glee Club. 
•• R u lie" I I ■ in.nl. "The 
Sheriff." 



PANTAGES (NEW) 

Market at Hyde 



I.on f'hnney in "Flesh 
and it I o od," screen. 
Marguerite Revue, six 

o.i I I c r i i) :i s; 1 rflllgO 
Trio, Lnurito. boy vio- 
linist; Oxford Trio. 

cycle novelty. 



UNION SQUARE 
O'Farrell nr. Powell 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



Wigwam 

Mission and 22nd 



Vaudeville-Pictures 



ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 



CALIFORNIA 
Market nt 4th 



"Pa" Potter. 
W. C. Fields, star. 
4 nil for nln orchestra. 



CAMEO 

Market opp. 5th 



Tom M i\ stnrrlner in 
"Hard Roiled" and Ma- 
bel \ or in a ml In "Hhk- 
K, c d y R n -s e" form a 
I ilouhle program run- 

Lnlng from Sal. to Wed. 

[ four days. "Kaslc of 

the Sen." Florence V i- 

dor and Ricnrdo Cortex 

Wed. to Sat. 



CASINO 

Fills at Mason 



Change of picture! 



January 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



IP TOWN 



Ariolplic JHenjou, Greln 
NisNi'ii, "Blonde or 
,~i>.v'tr>< ^ Brunette." EdiUe Peu- 
GKANADA v. „„„,., leader <»f (he or- 
Market at Jones St. J ehestrai .lurk Parting- 
ton «ill present entt'r- 
tninei s. 



ST. FRANCIS 
Market bet. 5th-6th 



i "The Kid Brother," p 

f Harold Lloyd 5 



WARFIELD 
Market nr. Taylor 



f 



"I.ady In Ermine," 
C'orinne Grillitli. "Fol- 
lies of 1000," Stage 
lire-sentnlion. 



ALHAMBRA 

(New) 

Polk and Green 



'The Marriage License,* 
A 1 m a R 11 hens. S a t. 
"Morals for Men,** Con- 
rad Tearle. Agnes Ay- 
ers. Sun. "We're in the 
Navy Now," Raymond 
Hatton-Wallllee Beery 
"dun., Tues., Wed. A 

TllUTS. 



ROYAL 
Polk nr. Cal. 



IliK Double Bill, Sat., 
Jan. -!>. "The Johns- 
town Flood." with Geo. 
O'Brien, star. "A Man. 
Four Square," Ruek 
Jones. Special Kiddies' 
Matinee, Sat. 



Alcazar 

"The Home Towners," fast moving 
farce-comedy at the Alcazar, has again 
brought the name of George M. Cohan, 
popular American playwright, favor- 
ably before the theater-going public of 
San Francisco. This stellar attraction 
Sunday night begins the seventh week 
of its local engagement and its drawing 
power is indicative of the fine enter- 
tainment it contains. 

Edward Cassidy furnishes a comedy 
treat by his interpretation of the role 
of P. H. Bancroft of South Bend and 
Helen Keers is most amusing as his 
wife. These are the home town folks. 
Thomas Chatterton and Muriel ( )wen 
are the New Yorkers, characters in 
great contrast to the first two, and each 
gives a well considered portrayal. 

* * * 
Warfield 

Corinne Griffith will appear in "The 
Lady in Ermine," screen attraction at 
the Warfield Theater this coming week, 
beginning Saturday. 

The background of the swiftly mov- 
ing story is the Austrian-Italian war 

of 1810, against which is set a romance 
between a man and woman of noble 
birth, enmeshed in the intrigue of Na- 
poleonic campaigns. 

Supporting Miss Griffith is a strong 
cast, including Francis X. Bushman, 
Einar Hanson, Ward Crane, and 
Charles Sellon. James Flood directed. 

On the stage the attraction i- the 
Fanchon and M4tco "Follies of 1900" 
in which are sharply contrasted the 
Gibson Girls, the Lillian Russels, tin- 
Anna llelds, and the present day Sun- 
feist Beauties, the Black Bottom, the 
Bizarre Costumes, ami the Night 
Clubs. Adele Kellogg and Florence 
Lewis are the featured dancers; Monty 
and Carmo, clever and diminutive per- 
formers and comedians; Eleanor Bing- 



ham, toe-dancer; Eileen Flory, com- 
edienne; .Mary Jane and Dolores Lo- 
pez; Frank O'Farrell and the Sunkist 
Beauties complete the cast. 

Rube Wolf and his greater band will 
present another excellent musical pro- 
ram. 

* * * 

Golden Gate 

"Paradise," Milton Sills' latest pic- 
ture, in which Betty Bronson is leading- 
lady, will be screened at the Golden 
Gate next week in conjunction with a 
vaudeville bill including three headline 
acts. The new Sills picture is a power- 
ful love drama of the South Seas. Noah 
Beery is the villian and a fight between 
Sills and Beery is one of the high spots 
of the picture. Charles Murray and 
Kate Price are other stars of the sup- 
porting cast. 

The trio of headline vaudeville acts 
on the same bill includes Anna Braile 
and Andre Pallo, French dance stars, 
assisted by their Yugoslav Royal ( )r- 
chestra in a sensational dance and mu- 
sic revue ; Sybil Vane, the Prima donna 
petite, in a program of songs, and funny 
Joe Stanley with a company of three 
in his comedy act "Waiting." Wahnita 
Wilcox is Stanley's featured assistant. 

The supporting show includes Marie 
Stoddard, character song star in her 
comed\ cycle, "Entertaining The 
Prince," and also Sankus and Sylvers, 
|o\ trot acrobats who perform feats of 
strength and tumbling with fox trot 
music. 

* * * 

Fah Dang Wui, 
Feast of the Lanterns 

Planning to make the coming cele- 
bration an annual event calculated to 
attract many thousands of visitors to 
San Francisco each year, the civic and 
fraternal organizations of this lily as- 
sisting in preparations for the Fah 
Dang Wui, colorful "Feast of the Lan- 
terns" celebration in San Francisco's 
Chinatown. February 17 to 26, are put- 
ting forth strenuous efforts to eclipse 
in brilliancy any former Festival in the 
history of San Francisco and northern 
California. 

The Chinatown area will be lighted 
by ten thousand lanterns during the 
Fah Dang Wui; all of the streets ami 
intersections being bridged with arch- 
ways of electrically-glowing lanterns. 
The merchants and residents of the 
( iriental quarter will vie with one an- 
other in presenting the most attractive 
and picturesque display of lanterns dur- 
ing the celebration. A novel Fashion 
show, with attractive Oriental manni- 
kins wearing the latest in Chinese and 
American styles of milady's attire will 
ged nightly, during the Fah Dang 
Wui. 



The committee headquarters, at 
Stockton and Clay streets, report tre- 
mendous interest from all parts of the 
city and Pacific Coast in the approach- 
ing brilliant celebration in San Fran- 
cisco's famous Chinatown. 



Orpheum 

This week's vaudeville program at 
the I (rpheum offers an all new bill with 
three headlining acts and a number of 
big features. 

Trixie Friganza, "grand duchess of 
comedy," who is making a return to 
vaudeville after motion picture engage- 
ments, will headline this week's bill 
with a new act. Billy House, singing- 
comedian will appear in "Resolutions," 
with several fascinating beauties in his 
company; Jeanette Hackett and Harry 
Delmar have a group of pretty girls in 
the revue entitled: "Luxuries." 

Extra attractions at the Orpheum 
this week starting- with Saturday's per- 
formances is the appearance for the 
first time of the San Francisco Real 
Estate Glee Club, an organization of 20 
male voices, with Eugene Blanchard, 
director, and Barbara Blanchard at the 
piano. 

Adelaide Herrmann, widow of Herr- 
mann the Great, and one of the very 
few women magicians in the world, ap- 
pears in "Magic, Grace and Music." 
Walter Brower, "The Jolly Jester"; 
Jack Clifford, in "The Sheriff" and 
Color Poems complete the new bill at 
the ( Irpheum. 



"What is a roof garden?" 
"That's where people sow their wild 
oats." — 1 )ennison Flamingo. 




NEW ORLEANS 



To better serve our many friends and 
patrons over'400,ooooo has been 
expended in reconstruction to 
maintain tliis famous hostelry as 

One of Americas leading Hotels , 

ACCOMMODATING 1000 GUESTS 

Lai$e rooms with unusually hi$h 
ceilings and Jood ventilation eb- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort 

Alfred S. Aimer and Ccitd. 

NEW ORLEANS. IA. 
Send &r descripthT foWtr Ticket Offices of 
Illustrated Mardi Gras all Transportation 
Program for the asking Biles in letihv 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1927 






Auto Show Interests 
FasHonable Society 

THE 1927 Pacific Automobile Show is interesting the 
fashionables in Society, this year, probably more than 
ever before. 

Society has always been a large contributing part to the 
gorgeous' Auto Shows staged in the Civic Auditorium, and, 
with the opening events today, January 29, until the con- 
clusion of the show, February 5, there will be coteries of 
society folks in constant attendance. 

Gowns for the Auto Show are already in readiness for at- 
tiring one's self for the auspicious display of the latest in 
motor cars, is ever an exciting incentive for new frocks in 
keeping with the last word in styles. 

Manufacturers readily admit that the smart set contribute 
largely to the success of every Auto Show and, this year, the 
attendance of many of the society folks is definitely de- 
termined. 

Teas, dinner parties and many novel supper parties have 
been planned by peninsula society leaders during the allur- 
ing "Auto Show" this year, for which such painstaking 
preparations have been made. 

* * * 
Crocker Dinner 

Mr. and Airs. Templeton Crocker entertained at a beau- 
tiful dinner party given in their San Mateo mansion last 
week, preceding the Clifford Weatherwax "red-and-white" 
ball about which all Society is still talking. There has never 
been a more brilliant social event in this part of the state 
than the ball given by Mr. and Mrs. Weatherwax in the 

Burlingame Country Club. 

# * * 

Mardi Gras 

Now comes the annual Mardi Gras ball, which, this year, 
will be staged at the Fairmont Motel on the evening of 
Tuesday, March 1, with the Children's Hospital the bene- 
ficiary. 

This year's Mardi Gras will be a "fairy tale" ball with ;i 
pageant introducing familiar characters of childhood's 
memories. 

Practically the entire main floor of the Fairmont Hotel 
will be utilized in presenting the colorful fete, the gold ball- 
room, the red room, laurel court and the Venetian ballroom 
to be settings for the beautiful affair. Supper will be served 
in the Norman room on the Terrace floor. 



By Antoinette Arnold 

Friendship Luncheon 

A group of men and women gathered at the Mark 1 lop- 
kins Hotel last Friday to attend a luncheon given by the 
newly organized Friendship Club with Mrs. A. \Y. Scott 
the honor guest. 

Seated at the head table Mrs. Scott was surrounded by ' 
many of her friends in the various fields of club work and 
educational activities. Her son, Mr. A. W. Scott Jr. and 
Mrs. Scott; her nephew, the lion. Judge Harold Louder- 
back and Mrs. Louderback ; and Mrs. George Louderback, 
wife of Prof. Louderback of the University of California 
were also honored with the noble-hearted woman to whom 
the large contingency of men and women delighted to pay 
homage. 

Estelle Carpenter, supervisor of music in the San Fran- 
cisco Schools, was a complimented guest with Mrs. Scott 
on this notable occasion, planned and directed in its en- 
tirety by Mrs. Rosalie Rooney, presiding officer at the in- 
itial gathering as the president of the newly formed Friend- 
ship Club. 

Speakers at the notable event voiced their appreciation 
of the honor guests, Mrs. Scott and Miss Carpenter, and 
paid tribute to them for their distinctive attainments. A 
basket of flowers was presented to Mrs. Scott as a gift 
from Mrs. George Shadburn. 

Mrs. Albert Stokes, president of the City Federation of 
Women's Clubs was a speaker, representing a group of 
some 10,000 federated women. 

Judge Harold Louderback addressed the Friendship Club 
including in his brilliant discourse high homage to his aunt, 
Mrs. A. W. Scott, and the purposes of the club. Colonel 
Thomas Yining spoke before the organization in his usual 
clever way recalling former days and associations. 

Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, prominent in California's mu- 
sical circles; Mrs. Frank B. Wilson, president of the Pa- 
cific Musical Club; Mrs. Josephine Wilson, Mrs. Malcolm 
( ). Austin, representing the Daughters of American Revolu- 
tion, Mrs. Pernau Walsh, president of the California Club; 
Mrs. N. Lawrence Nelson, past-president Women's Press 
Association; Mrs. Christophur C. Barre, Builders' Club; 
Miss Jennie Partridge, Mrs. Sauter, Mrs. Edward Ransom 
Place, Mr. George Shadburn and Mrs. Martial Davoust 
seated at the honor table gave brief talks. 



Leonard Luncheon 

Mrs. A. T. Leonard was hostess at an interesting luncheon 
given at the Hotel Mark Hopkins last Thursday, when the 
following were guests: Mesdames Gerald Campbell, Jew- 
ett W. Adams, James F. Dunne, Richard O. Bliss, A. E. 
Sbarboro, Harold Louderback, Bruce McBirney, Eileen M. 
Leonard, M. D., Mrs. Bishop and Miss Frances Molera. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

On the Coait Highway Halfway Between San Franeiieo and Lot Angela 

An Inn of I nusual Excellence 

Wira or \rrit* for ro$mrvationa on your next crip louth 



Son of Honor Guest 

( )ne of the brilliant talks of the Friendship Club was 
given by Mr. A. W. Scott, who augmented the purpose of 
the event by flashes of wit and sincere adulation to the won- 
derful woman, his mother, who was honor guest of the day. 

* * * 
Officers 

In presenting the names of the officers of the Friendship 
Club, Mrs. Rosalie Rooney, named the following leaders: 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

850 Ruah Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Franeiaea 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 
-- ..-...-.-.-.--..... ...--.4 



January 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Honorary president, Mrs. A. W. Scott; Hon- 
orary vice-presidents, Mrs. Marshall Hale and 
Mrs. George Shadburn; President. Mrs. Ros- 
ilie Rooney; Edgar Reinhold, first vice-presi- 
lent ; Miss Ruth Davis, second vice-president; 
Leo Cadenasso, treasurer; Mrs. Daniel Han- 
on. secretary. 

Miss Catherine Burkholder was the honor 
juest at a no-host tea given by a group of 
friends last Thursday in the Peacock Court of 
the Mark Hopkins Hotel. Guests included: 
Misses Rose Nilsen, Madeline Hunicke, lima 
Quin Ian, Helen King, Melba Lagomarsino, 
Gertrude Gieson, Evelyn Parker, Gladys Wal- 
dron, Mary Falkenstein, Myrtle Savage, Julia 
Nichols, Elizabeth Niderost, Herta Ilgen, Fran- 
ces Sousa, Helen Fox, Shirley Millman. 
* * * 

Noted Author Is 
Guest of Honor 

Robert Keable, famous novelist, was the 
honor guest at an elaborate dinner given by the 
Golden Gate Branch League of American Pen 
Women, at the St. Francis Hotel, many distinguished writ- 
ers, authors, composers and musicians being among the in- 
vited guests. 

Mrs. Ella M. Sexton, president of the Golden I late Branch, 
presided at the notable affair and .Mrs. Walter R. Jones 
was in charge of the program. This even marked the first 
appearance of Mr. Keable at a woman's club and was made 
possible through Mrs. Grace Sanderson Michie, organizing 
president, who has written the screen version of Keable's 
book, "Numerous Treasure." 



Famous Speakers 

Stressing the subject of "Dressing the Heroine," the au- 
thors gave personal experiences in the subject, introducing 
original ideas clothed witli sparkling wit and scintillating 
humor. The authors and newspaper writers who spoke at 
the Robert Keable dinner of the Golden (late Pen Women 
were: Charles Caldwell Dobie, Barrett Willoughby, John 
Hamlin, Joan London. Armine von Tempski, Grace San- 
derson Michie. John Barry; Miss Mary Coghlan, Lannie 
Haines Martin of Los Angeles; Laid Elder, Charm ian Lon- 
don, Miss Nadia Lavrova, Josephine Bartlett, Lillian Con- 
nelly. Miss Virginia Sullivan, Mrs. Tom Nunan, Josephine 
Young Wilson, Miss Zilfa Estcourt, Miss Nellie Clcarv. 
Mrs, William Beckmah, Mrs. \\ . I:, Hamilton. 

"Ninon" of the Chronicle told of fashion dictates. Milo 
Kent, representing the Mayor of San Francisco, gave a cor- 
dial greeting to the honor guest, Mr. Keable, in behalf of the 

City. Mrs. John J. Cuddy spoke of the Children's Theater 

and Tessa Dent McQuire. composer, referred to tones and 
coloring in musical compositions. Mrs. Shirley Edwards 
also gave a clever talk. Miss Ethel Shorh of the Bulletin 
was an invited guest. ( (thers were Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey 
M'Covern, Mr. Lyman Foster Martin. Mr. and Mrs. F. j. 
Young. Anne Blake Mezquida, Mateo Mezquida, Miss 
Marion Oliver, Mr. Harold Macdougall, Mr. and Mrs. Hol- 
lister McGuire, Stanley Hey man, Miss |eanette Lencher, 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Mansfield, Mr! and Mrs. E. J. 
Leonard. Miss I". Kelly. Miss Geneve Shaffer. William 1. 
Coghlan, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Michie. 

The former lackling suite on the top floor :<i the St. Fran- 
cis Hotel was the setting for tile brilliant gathering of writ- 
ers than which none more distinctive has taken place in 
western literary circles in manv-a day. 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
ates: From $2.50 per day 



Kathleen Norris 
Will Address Club 

Kathleen Norris, noted author, will be tin- 
honor guest and speaker before the Lap and 
Bells Club at the literary day to be held on 
Friday, February 4, in the California room of 
the Fairmont Hotel, the change of date being 
necessitated by the author's plans to leave 
early in February for New York. 

Many literary leaders from San Francisco 
and the Bay cities will be special guests on the 
Kathleen Norris Day at Cap and Bells. Jo- 
sephine Swan White will give cantillations and 
excerpts from books by Mrs. Norris, which 
will be read by members of the literary section. 
Mrs. John Sylvester Pinney, president of Cap 
and Bells will direct the day with past-presi- 
dents assisting in the receiving line. 
* * * 

Society Attends 
Farewell Recital 

Many society folks from the bay cities gath- 
ered in the ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel re- 
cently to attend the farewell recital given in 
honor of Miss Alicia Scott, the beautiful soprano singer. 

Unusually gifted with a voice so clear and bell-like that 
she was chosen from among a large group of vocal aspirants 
by Mine. Luella Melius of the Chicago Grand ( )pera Com- 
pany as having the best voice and talent in the West, Miss 
Alicia Scott has also requisites for stage success, person- 
ality, sincerity and charm. 

Miss Scott is a beautiful girl to begin with and her mas- 
tery of the varied selections on her program ranging from 
the difficult compositions of Mozart, L'ergolesi, Bellini, Char- 
pentier, Rameau, Martini, the Mad Scene from Hamlet, to 
the Schubert, Strauss, numbers and then, on to the more 
modern songs, by Bishop, Densmore and Buzzi-Peccia, this 
young singer of remarkable talent certainly displayed gifts 
of musical understanding and training which, we are quick 
to predict will soon land her on a pedestal of fame. 

Miss Scott was showered with flowers and commendation 
as was also her side instructor, Homer Henley, a member 
of the Pacific Coast Academy of Singing. 

Pretty ushers seated the audience which packed the gold 
ballroom of the Fairmont. Mis- Ruth Bacon, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bacon of Oakland, was one of the 
most charming and attractive of the lovely young girls who 
directed us to our -eats, at the memorable Alicia Scott re- 
cital. Musician.- from various parts of the state journeyed 
to San Francisco in order to attend the farewell recital ot 
the California girl who is leaving for Europe to complete 
her musical studies under the special sponsorship of the 
noted operatic singer. Mine. Luella Melius. 
* * * 

Student Dance 

\ pretty party and student dance took place this past 
week at the Belie Monti Country Club, with Miss Martha 
Catching, a popular student of the Polytechnic High School, 
the hostess. 

Those who attended Mi-s Catching's student dance were: 
Mis-es Helen Jackson, Lulu Soderman, Esther Christen- 
sen. Ruth Richardson. Martha Thayer. Dorothy Titlow, 
Claire Stayart. Fstelle Viganego. Margaret Catching. Betty 
Curry, Margaret Voigt, Eleanor Young. Marguerite Gos- 
selt. Lucille Miller. Phyllis Cheminant. Alice G. Kos-. Mar- 
garet Simpson. Emetine l'urdie. Betty Wales. Jeanette 
Ahrens. Lillian Knoll. Kathleen Unmack, Pauline Terrell. 
Virginia Jason. Eugenia Duffy, Libertha Vivell, Esther Mil- 
ler. \\ ilrov Catching. Eleanor Kennedy. Elmere Werner. 
(Continued on Page -1 1 






10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 





C. J. Pennington 

Poor Economy 

THERE are many people who pur- 
chase cheap radio sets with the idea 
in mind of securing- a better one later on. 
This sort of economy is not in the least 
wise. Why not start right by purchasing 
a receiving set which is first-class and 
will give good service for many years, 
rather than losing the price of the first 
set purchased ? 

The original price of the ordinary re- 
ceiving set is around one hundred dollars 
complete, and by adding a small amount 
to that a receiving set may be purchased 
which is capable of accomplishing many 
things that a cheap set will not. 

A cheap radio set is good enough for a 
time, but it is not long before its owner 
hears a good receiver operating and he 
then becomes dissatisfied with what he 
has and his investment turns out to be a 
total loss. 

We know of many such cases and one 
in particular where a man has operated 
his set for only two months, and is con- 
templating the purchase of a better re- 
ceiver within the very near future. The 
set he now has will be a total loss, or 
nearly so. considering its make and what 
he will receive for it on the trade-in. 

The same applies to accessories. Why 
pay ten dollars for a loud-speaker, only 
to discard it in favor of a higher priced 
speaker in a short time? This is also 
being done continually, and it is being 
dene under the guise" of wise economy 
and saving money. 

A much better method, we believe, for 
a buyer to follow, if he is only able finan- 
cially, to afford a mediocre set, is to put 
that amount away until he is able to af- 
ford a better outfit, or to place what he 
has down on a high-class receiver ami 
pay the balance in installments. The in- 
terest on the balance would certainly not 



amount to as much as the loss incurred 
through the purchase of a cheap radio 
set and afterwards junking it. The buyer 
would at least be assured he was getting a 
good set and not a jumbled up mess of 
cheap radio apparatus thrown together 
under the name of a receiving set. 

This particular method of doing busi- 
ness is being done daily and the sooner 
the radio buying public realizes the use- 
lessness of it. the quicker the radio in- 
dustry will operate on a sound basis. Re- 
ceiving sets will then become a jov in- 
stead of a lot of grief, such as a large 
majority of them are at present. 
* * * 

The Latest Tube is Three In One 

A new vacuum tube incorporating 
three tidies in one and known as the 
"multivalve" has been placed on the mar- 
ket. 

The tube consists of the elements of 
three tubes embodied within a glass bulb. 
In outward appearance the tube is similar 
to those in use at the present time, ex- 
cept for the fact that four binding posts 
are provided in the base of the tube for 
making connections with the other ele- 
ments inside the tube. 

According to an official of the com- 
pany, this tube can be used in any stand- 
ard receiver with few changes in the 
wning of the set. The volume from one 
of the new "multivalve" tubes is suffi- 
cient to operate a loud speaker when 
chawing .25 amperes at 5 volts. 

The tube can be operated with dry 
cells, storage battery or eliminator with 
equally good results. A complete receiver 
may he built with only one "multivalve." 
If more' power is required at the output, 
a L'X-171 power tube can be incorpo- 
rated in the circuit, giving sufficient vol- 
ume and working as effectively as a four 
or five-tube set. 

The characteristics of the tube are such 
that the plates will take any voltage up to 
13.s. The filament is of rugged construc- 
tion similar to that employed in 201-A 
type tubes. (_'ut into three sections, one 
for each of the three grid and plate units, 
the sections are connected in series so 
that the final effect is the same as if a 
single 201-A type filament were used. 

Any standard socket may lie used in 
connection with this tube. The four 
prongs on the bottom, which make con- 
tact with the socket in the conventional 
manner, supply the plus and minus fila- 
ment connections and the plate and grid 
connections for the mi. Idel unit. The 
plate and grid connections for the other 
two units are taken from the binding 
posts attached to the tube base. 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO^t28.3 

Sunday, January :to 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 

inin-sectarian church service. 
10:45 a. m. — Weather forecast. 
2:40 tri 4:15 p. in. — Concert of the San Franj 
Cisco Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion or Alfred Hertz, broadcast by rvl J o. 
K<l< i and KFI. 
6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 
6:30 p. m. — General information. 
0:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 
8:35 to 111:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 

Orchestra. 
10:00 io 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 

t 'al il'ornians. 
Monday, January :ti 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 
10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 
10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

1- loon — Time signais, Scripture readings 

1 "I' lo 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 

Orchestra. 
3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 
5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 
6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stuck market quotations. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 

Orchestra. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to s:in p. m. — Chamber of Commerce talkf 
8:10 to 8:25 p. m. — Hook reviews. 
x:25 o, loon p. in. — Bridge lesson .No. II. 
9:00 to iu:0n p. m.— Studio program. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Billy Long's Cabiriand 
1 I 00 io i- p. m. — KPO Vai iety Hour. 

Tuesday, February 1 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises, 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:"» to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
( irchestra, 

Palace Hotel Concert Oi 



-Children's Hour. 

-Stock market quotations. 

-States Restaurant Orches- 



3:30 to 5:30 p. 
chestra. 

5:30 to G:15 p. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 lo 9:00 p m. — "Uda Waldrop Hour." 

9:00 i" 10:00 p. m. — Program by the kpo 
Trio and Gypsy ami Marta. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:"" I" 12:0.i p. m— Hilly lame's Cal.irians. 

Wednesday, February 1! 

6:45, ,:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1 lo 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 

Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to r-30 p. m — Stock ma-ket quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

9:1 1":"" p. m. — "Chlckering Hour." 

10:oo to 11:00 p. m. — states Restaurant or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — .Inhn Wolohan and his 
• 'a Iffornians, 

Thursday, February :t 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises, 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes, 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 



January 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



11 



Radio Program for Next Week 



i;i."i to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:Ut> p. m. — States Kestaurant (Jicnes- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:"0 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 

Ca lifornians. 
'■"liilny. February 4 

i; :■(:■, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion Talk. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing-. 

B:15 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — "Sports on the air." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 
DO to 10:00 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
i \< lifornians. 

Sntnrtlny, February ."» 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 

3:30 to 5:30p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Simultaneous l>ro;i .le;i si 
by KPt i and KFI. 

00 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

HiMMi to i :'"i ;I , m. — Walter Kraus§rriH*s Or- 
chestra* 
no to 11:00 p. m. — Maurice Gunsky, tenor. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
IJnily Except Sumlny 

9:oo t<> 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m.- — A'oc;ii and Instrumental 

Selections. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE. SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sum-In >, .l.-i ■ mi. ■ i > :.o 

2:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Sunday school 
■00 i" 5:00 p. m. — Temple service 
1:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Evening aervtat 

lltuiday, January :tl 

ra:80 to 1:00 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading 

Tue»<lti>, February 1 

6:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Daily Scrip tui 

§:00 i" 10:00 p. m. — studio program, 

\\ * (ini-sihiy. February S 

fe:30 to l :00 p. m — Dally Scriptui 

B;30 to 1:00 p. m. — Divine healing service. 

1:00 to 10:00 p. m, — Studio program. 

Thursday, February :t 

18:80 to 1:00 p. m. — Daily Scripture ree 

Fi Idnj , February 1 

IB:30 to 1:00 p. m. — "Daily Scripture r< 

S 00 to 10:00 p, m. — Studio program. 

,ioo in 4:00 p. m. — Sunshine houi 

Saturday, February ."• 

i" SO to 1:00 p. i". — Daily Scripture reading. 



KYA— PACIFIC BROADCOASTING CORP. 

SAN FRANCISCO— 399.8 
Sunday, January SO 

F*80 to : p m —Central Methodlsl Church, 

Service Conducted by Rev, \\ J, Sherman. 
Monday i January SI 

\ 2 00 p. m. — 'Miit Hotel Concert Trio. 

|:80 to i 30 p. m.—Cllft Hotel Concerl Trio. 
\ mii to [0:00 p. in.— stu.lio Program, Offer- 
Popular Night*' Artists 
Tuesday. February i 

18:8 8:00 i> m.—Cllft Hotel Concert Trio. 

p. m — I'lit'i Hotel Concerl Trio 
10 00 to 11:00 p m- — ('lift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra 
\\ tdneaday . Febraary - 

DO p in. — i'lift Hotel Concert Trio 
p m.— Cllfi Hotel Concert Trio. 
m. — Studio Progi 
to u ;oo p. m. — (.'lift Hotel i >ance Or- 
chestra, 



Thursday, February :t 

12:30 to 2:00 p, m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

10:00 to li:0o p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Fi iday, February 4 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Saturday. February 5 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 250 

Sunday, January 30 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Community Chest program. 

7:50 to 9:00 p. m. — Services broadcast from 
Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Monday, January 31 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu Studio pro- 
gram. 

6:00 to 6:30 p. m. — Jerry Hills and his Uke. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — jStudio program with popu- 
lar artists. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10.00 p. m. — Impromptu Studio pro- 
gram. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Tuesday. February 1 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Jack Curtis and his band. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m, — bonis Donato, tenor. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Ionaco with Gaylord "Wil- 
shire. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — San Francisco Opera 
Compa ny. 

Wediu'Mdny, February - 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu Studio Pro- 
gram. 

ii:iio 1 1. 7:30 p. in. — Bill Bennett, baritone. 

moo i<i 8:20 p. in. — Billy Divine and Clem 
k in nedy. 

8:20 to 8:30 p. m. — Becker Storage program. 

8;30 to 1.0:00 p. m. — Impromptu Studio pro- 
uiiiin. Jerry Hills and Mike Capraro. 

in mi to 12:00 p. mi. — Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Thur*dfiy. February 3 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio pro- 
gram. 

to i :30 p. mi. — Program featuring A I 

Pi arce. 

s 00 i" 8:30 p. in. — Popular ballads with 
Henry Haman 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

i n mi to 12 nil p, m. — Paul Kelli's ■ (rchestra, 

Fi Iday . February 4 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Impromptu studio program. 

i; oo to fi '" p. "i -Bill] Dei tne, ballad s 

,, so i,, ; 30 p in m Bryanl and his Orches- 
tra, 

6 8:30 p. hi- -Gertrude Tracy and Clem 

Kennedy. 

8:80 to 9:00 p. m. — 'Ionaco" with Gaylord 
Wllahlre. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program, 

Saturday. February r. 

9:00 to 12:00 p m. — Paul Kelll'a Orchestra. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 

Sunday* January SO 

n oo a. in .— First M. th -list Episcopal Church 

service, i 
2:40 p m.— San Francisco Symph 

tra concert, direction of Alfi 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Hem's Symphony Orches- 

7:80 p m. — Weather bureau report. 

m .— Flrzd Methodist Episcopal Church 
s. i\ Ice, ( >akland. 

10:00 P- in— Bern's Symphony Orches- 
t ra. 
Noaday, January :ti 

noon to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 
ather Bureau report. 
1:80 p m. — N. Y Stock reports. 
- ick reporta 

ni. 

Women's Clubs, 

, idtea Kluh. 
p m.— Bern's Little Symphony, 
p m —News Itema 

p m —Weather Bureau report. 

- s K Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

p m — N Y Stock reports iclosing'. 
; |] p m.— S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
ntinued on Page 1_> 



-California Federation of 






H 


1 m 

|9 




■4fc 



Horax Mam HoPKras 

San Francissco's smartest rendezvous . . . 
where Sddie Harkness and his Orchestra have 
won the hearts of the city 's smart set! 

TEA T)ANSANTf Monday and Saturday 
Afternoons, four 'til six, One Dollar. 

CONCERTTEA rTues.,Wed..Thur., Fri. 
Afternoons, four 'til six, Fifty Cents. 

'DINNER T)ANCE , Nightly (except Sun.) 
seven "til nine, Table d'Hoce, Two-fifty. 
No Couvert for Dinner GueSts. 

SUPPER T>ANCE * Nightly (except Sun.) 
nine 'til one, Couvert Fifty Cents; Satur- 
day, Couvert One Dollar. 
Qihintby Viflor 




Jollozv the 

Qolden Ttyad 

to He alt hi 



Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 5:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California: for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 






12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1927 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Tuesday, February i 

12:00 noon to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

5:00 p. m. — '"Mental Measurements." 

6:uu to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's .Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

T:03 p., m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing;. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 
Pilgrims." 

9:00 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 

9:20 •). m. — Surprise broadcast. 

Wednesday, February U 

12:00 noon to 1:00 p. m, — Luncheon concert. 

12:80 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

3:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

5:30 p. m. — "For instance," by General Jack- 
son. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

t:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — ,S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 p. m. — (S. F. Studio) Farm Program 

8:10 p. m. — (Series) "The Cattle Industry on 
the Pacific Coast." 

8:20 p. m. — An interview with the Agricul- 
tural Economist. 

8:30 p. m. — W.O. W.Male Trio. 

S:40 p. m. — Address. 

9:00 p. m. — W. O. W. Male Trio. 

Thursday, February 3 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Classroom instruction, 
Oakland Public Schools. 

12:ii0 noon to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 
to Boys." 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little .Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stocks (closing). 

S:00 to 9:30 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) — Light 
Opera "The Bells of Corneville." 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Philpofs Midship- 
men. 

Friday. February 4 

11:10 a. m. — Homemaking Talk. 

12:00 noon to 1 :00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7.06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

8:00 p. m. — Studio Program. 

Saturday. February fi 

12:00 noon to 1:00 p. m. — Luncheon concert. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 

12:33 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

12:40 p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 

8:00 p. m. — "Weekly Sport Review." 

8:15 to 9:15 p. m. — Program from the Hotel 
Leamington, Oakland. 

9:15 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's 
Band dance music. 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 

Ifouday, .January 31 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News Broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting Lake 
Merritt Ducks. 

Tuesday. February 1 

!7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, February IS 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 

Thursday. February 3 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday. February 4 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8 :00 to 9:45 p. m. — Program. 

9:45 to 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Or- 
chestra, 

Saturday. February .% 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 

Sunday. January 30 

9:00 a. m. — International Sunday School Les- 
son. 

11:00 to 12:00 noon — Church services. 

Monday. January 31 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

Wednesday. February '2 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

8:00 p. m. — Sacred songs. 

Thursday. February 3 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Sacred variety program. 

Friday. February 4 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Bible Study Hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Telephone or write in your health 
questions and they will be informally dis- 
cussed. 

Saturday. February 5 

1:30 to 2:30 p. m. — Children's Church Broad- 
cast. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
Forecast; (b) Announcements of Churches 
for Sunday. 



-EARLE C. ANTHONY, 
LOS ANGELES-^67 



INC., 



KTAB- 



-ASSOC1ATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 



Sunday, January 30 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Prof. A. E. Linsley's Bible 
class. 

11:00 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 
Church. 

7:45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 
Church. 

Monday. January 31 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Selections from Light 
Opera. 

Tuesday. February 1 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 
Stamp Collectors. 

8:15 to 10:00 p. m. — The KTAB Quartet. 

Wednesday, February 2 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program under the di- 
rection of Wm. Hayes, baritone. 

Thursday. February 3 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

Friday, February 4 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 6:2n p. m. — Twenty minutes with Dr. 
Thompson. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

8:00 to 0:00 p. m. — Oden and Richard's Ha- 
waiian Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Goat Island Goats. 

Saturday, February 5 

S:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

KRE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 

Sunday. January 30 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Church Service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Dinner Concert. 

8:15 to 9:00 p. m. — Social concert. 

Monday. January 31 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday, February 1 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 10:00 n. m. — Studio program. 

Wednesday, February ^ 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

Thursilay. February 3 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 m io : oo p. m. — Studio program. 

Friday, February 4 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m, — Current news. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 

Saturday, February •"» 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance program. 



(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 

Sunday, January 30 

1 0:00 a. m. — Morning Services. 

2:45 p. m. — Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia presents San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, Conductor; broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI, KPO, KGO. 

6:00 p. m. — Program by Russian Academy of 
Musical Art. Boris Myronoff, piano; Mischa 
Speigel, violin; Alex Bo rr is off, cello. 

7:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital; Alex 
Reilly at the console. 

8:00 p. m. — Packard Classic Hour. Sylvia 
Zeitlen Rosenthal, concert pianist. 

9:00 p. m. — Bob Bottger and his Venetians 
Dance Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill 
Hennessey, Director. 

Monday, January 31 

10:00 to 10:20 a. m. — Face and Scalp Hygiene 
by Georgia O. George. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnes 
White. 

■ r . : :':i i p. m. — Virgil Ray's Winter Garden Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 ]>. m.- — < Jn.rg.:- Wilder Cartwright. 

6 :30 p. in. — Vest I 'ocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians, 

8:00 p. in. — Cello and Harp recital by Annie 
Timner and Louise Klos. 

9:00 p. m. — £>emi-classlcal music program. 

10:00 p. m. — Program by Meiklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, February 1 

5:30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiian^. 

6:15 p. m. — Music Appreciation Chat and 
Father Ricard's Sun Spol Weather Km-. - 
cast. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Paul Howard's Quality Seren- 
aders. 

8:00 p. m. — Gattone String Quartet. 

icon p. m. — Varied program. 

10:0m p. m. — Azure Music Club, Glen Edmunds 
and his Collegians. 

Wednesday. February 2 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on Child Training 
by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Fiour Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnes 
White. 

5:30 p. m. — Jack Murray's Italian Village Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Vera. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period. 

7:00 p. m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians, 

7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris, Detective Stories; 

7:45 p. in. — William MacDougall, Scotch conv 
edian. 

8:00 p. m. — Program by Calpet Suing Quar- 
tet, Chico De Verde, director, presented i>v 
the California Petroleum Corporation. 

9 :00 p. m. — Popular program. 

10*00 p. m. — Sunset Instrumental Quartet — 
Dorothy Ruth Miller, concert pianist. 

Thursday. February 3 

5:30 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m . — KFI Radiotorial Period, 

6:30 p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton flub Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by University of South- 
ern California. 

8:00 p. m. — KFI Drama Hour. 

0:00 p. m. — Program arranged by Selwyn 
Harris. 

10:00 p. m. — Johnston & Farrell's Music Box 
Hour, direction of loin Johnston. 




January 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



Filriny. February 4 

10:2ii i" ln:tn ;i, in. — Talk on home manage- 
ment by Agnes White. 
lu i ii to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker. Gold 

Medal Home Service Talks. 
11:10 to 11:30 — Food Talks by Agnes White. 
KSO p. m. — Matinee program. 
6:15 i>. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 
6:30 p. m. — Baron Keyes. 
7 : i ) n p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts and 

Leslie Adams, whistler. 
S:0U p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Alex Reil- 

Iv at the console. 
BOO p. m, — Alma Frances Gordon, contralto, 

Lillian Ariel, pianist. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour. 
Hhturdny. February 5 
B;30 p. m. — Billy Cox and his Angeleno Ag- 

gravators. 
Kl5 p. m. — Madame Nelson. 
g:30 p. m. — Popular Music Hour. 
7:30 p. m. — Felipe Delgado, Spanish Lyric 

baritone — Edna Clark Muir, pianist. 
S) ,n p. m. — Grand Opera Program — Virginia 

Flohri, soprano; Ma urine Dyer, Robert 

Hutd, Mission Bell Orchestra, Pryor Moore. 

director. Broadcast simultaneously by* 

KFI and KPO. 
9:00 p. m. — Varied Program. 
10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club — Esther 

Walker, pianist. 
11:00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

Dnily Except Sunday 

8:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

8:55 a. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 a. m. — Chopping News. 

10:30 a. m. — Household Economics except Fri- 
day and Saturday. 

12:00 m. — George Redman's Orchestra, 

]::n p. m. — The Book Worm. 

4:iin p. m. — Lost and Found column. 

■66 P- m. — Market reports. 

5:-ir. p. m. — The Town Tattler, 

6:00 p. m. — George Redman's Orchestra. 

B0O p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert, 

Sunday, January MO 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood, 

2:im> in COO p. m. — City Park Board Musical 
i 'rogram, 
80 p _ m .— First Unitarian Church 

7:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Holly- 
wood. 
mi p. m, — Concerl Orchestra, 

BOO p. m. — Feature Program, 

Mnmliiy. January :ti 

gOQ p. m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

4:00 p. m. — Little Jen n. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

HO p. m. — Playlet. 
:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
■on p m. — KNX !•'. -aim.- program, 

iii:ini [i in,— KNX Feature program. 

ll ;ini p. m. — <ius A.rnheim'8 Oicheatra. 

Tuesday, I-Vbriinrj- 1 

00 p. m. — Combined program by Police and 

Fire Oepts. 
|;00 p. in- Radio ma I i nee 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program, 
7;::n p. in. — Feature program, 
S:0ii p. in. — Feature program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

i i p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra 

\\ i ihnsdn? . Febrnary - 

7 no p tn. — i '"in tesj progra m< 

7:30 p. m. — Feature program, 

g :imi ii. m.- i 'ourl esy pi ogi am. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. in. — Feat ure pi ogi -mi 

li ;iin p. m. -Qua Arnhelm'a i 

VhurNilay, February :t 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

7:00 p. in- Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

8:00 ii. m i 'ourl esy prog > :i m. 

9 mi to 10:00 p. m.- Feal ure | 

10:00 p. in — Feature program, 

1 1 ;00 p. in — i lua Arnheim's i i 

Fililn.i. l<VI»ruiir> 1 

3:0ti p. m. — Musical program 
4:00 p. in.— H.\v Scouts' Musical Program. 
Bo p. m.— Feature prog ram. 
Sinn p m - Feature program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program, 
p, m. - feature program, 
p m Que IrnheinTs ■ ■ 
BjBturdny, Kehrunrj R 

3:ito p. m.— The Town Crier of Itae Day. 
m.— Stories of insect life. 
m- Announcement ser- 

vices of th«- leading Los Angeles churches. 
7:30 p. m. — Courtesj program. 

m. — Feature program, 
9:u0 p. m. — Feature program. 
D:00 p. in—*; us Arnheim's Orcln - 

in- KNX Frolic from the main studio. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 
Sunday, January :to 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Monday* January :tl 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

9:00 to 1(1:1)11 p. m. — European Novelty Or- 
chestra. 

lOMiii p. m. — 'Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Tuesday, February 1 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7 ::"i) p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ment 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 



9:00 to i0:iiu p. m. — Myrtle Waters, Boprano. 
10:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Wednesday! I'Vhrujiry 2 

6:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

fi:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sun- 
shine. 

7:30 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting Announce- 
ments. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Little Junior Sym- 
phony. 

10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Thursday, February '.i 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7:00 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

(Continued on Page 14) 




Cliffy "Body Styles and Types 
CfiveShRindredGolorGombinations 




KKRC 
S w Fr vncisco 
tnd— Burlingame 




At The Auto Show-The pre-eminent 
display this year as in previous ones will 
be the Cadillac exhibit. For a quarter of 
a century Cadillac has led the world in 
the production of fine cars. The models 
on exhibit at the Auto Show will reflect the 
experience and triumphs achieved in the 
past combined with new developments 
and beautiful designs that will insure its 
continued leadership in the future. WIS 

Prices from 
K) upwards 
F.O.B. Sun Francisco 



NEW QO DECREE 



I L LAC 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



January 29. 1921 



9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 
10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Friday, February 4 

6 00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour concert. 

7 00 to 7:50 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments, interspersed with musical numbers. 

7:50 to s:00 p. m. — News items. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Jack Medford, popular 

9 0o"to S iO:10 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Saturday. February 5 

6-00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 10 8:00 p. m. — Interesting announce- 
ments. „ , ,. 

S:0(l to 0:00 p. m. — Program featuring Luella 
James, contralto. 

9 00 to 10:110 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN, PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 
Suiidav. January 30 

10:55 to 12:30 p. m.— Morning services. 

4-00 to 6:00 p. m.— KGW Salon Orchestra. 

7-30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Monday, January 31 

7:15 a. m.— Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6 00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
700 to 7:30 p. m. — Children s Program. 
7-30 to 7:45 p. m.— Utility service. 
S00 to 10:00 p. m.— Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Tuesday. February 1 
9-45 to ln:00 a. m.— Health Exercises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12 ::u to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
200 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 

6 00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
700 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8-00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday. February 15 

7 15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12-30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6'00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Utility service 
7-30 to 8:00 p. m. — Albers Poultry School. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 
Thursday, February 3 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
12'30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
600 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility Service. 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. . 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment 
Friday, February 4 
7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 
9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health exer- 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps, 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert, 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
700 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Weekly meeting of the 

KGW Movie Club. 
8:30 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weakly frolic of the 

Keep Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 
Saturday. February ti 

ni:im to 11:30 ii. in- — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather report. 
8:00 to x::iii p. in. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

KJR— NORTHWEST RADIO SERVICE CO., 

SEATTLE— 384.4 
Sunday. January 30 

11:00 to 12:30 p. m. — Church Service. 

7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — Evening Service. 

9:15 to 10:45 p. m. — Orchestra under direction 
of Henry Damski. 

Monday, January 31 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — "What to prepare for 
tonight's dinner." 

10:20 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music 



Tuesday. February 1 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Wednesday. February 'i 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quotations. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Thursday. February 3 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

11:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 

Fl iilay. February 4 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

3:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — KJR Studio Program. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

Saturday. February r» 

10:00 to 10:30 a. m. — Post Intelligencer Talk. 

10:30 to 11:30 a. m. — Musical Program. 

12:00 m. — Time Signals. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — New York Stock quota- 
tions. 

6:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

6:05 to 6:10 p. m. — Weather reports. 

6:10 to 6:30 p. m. — KJR News Items. 

10:00 p. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance Music. 



PLEASURE'S WAND 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. January 30 

10:30 a. m. — Solemn High Mass. 
6:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

7:45 a. m. — Service -.1' InininculaU- Cnnri-ptinn 
i ';i thedral. 

Monday, January 31 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Children's hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday. February 1 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:15 p. in.— Talk. 

:::::u p. m. — Matinee. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

m. — Fashion review. 

m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

m. — Farm question box. 

m. — Instruction In Auction Bridge. 

day, February 2 



4:45 p 
6:00 p 
7:30 p. 
9:00 p. 
Wcdn 



11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:30 p. m. — Wynken. Blynken and Nod. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

* : 1 5 p. m. — Studio program. 

Thursday, February 3 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

Friday, February 4 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 

12:15 p. m. — Instrumental Concert. 

1:00 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

8:16 p. m ._ Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion Review. 

6:oo p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

7:00 p .m. — "Aggie Klekoffs." 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 

school lesson. 
8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
S:15 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday, February r, 
11:45 a. m. — Weather, road reports. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
10:30 p. m. — Dance program. 



1 1 'mil in ued from Page 7) 

Granada 

Eddie Peabody leader of ttie Gran-j 
ada Orchestra, who lias just returned 
from his vacation with mure pep than 
ever will direct one of his excellent 
musical programs at the (iranada The- 
ater this week. Eddie's solos arc al- 
ways greeted with enthusiastic ap- 
plause. His entire program is seldom 
surpassed. 

Jack Partington's stage presenta- 
tions, this coming week, commencing 
with today's performances, will include 
a number of entertainers up to the high 
standard of this brilliant young theater 
man's originality. 

Adolphe Menjou and Greta Nisserj 
are the stars this week in "Blonde or 
Brunette," a farce comedy, adapted 
from the Parisian stage play. "An 
Angel Passes." 



Symphony 

Tsehaikou sky's "Nutcracker Suite" 
will be played by the San Franciscd 
Symphony ( Ircbcstra, Sunday after-] 
nopn, in its seventh popular concert at I 

the Curran Theater. 

1 1 'out inn.-, i i,n i 'age 22 1 



L 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

will bring 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements, 
Income Tax Reports. 

Expert Auditor 

Part-time Service 
268 Market St., Room 101 



CLUB 

Auto Service Co, 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



685 Post St. 
San Francisco 



January 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

THE ROTARIANS 

International Convention, Ostend, June, 1927 

"TTTORLD TRAVEL," according to the testimony of 

W its readers, is quite unlike any other travel journal. 
It does not contain threadbare descriptions of well-known 
English watering- places, or a commonplace account of a 
week's holiday in Paris or Brussels. It is conducted by 
travel experts, some of whom are Rotarians, and the infor- 
mation which it contains is based on an experience in travel 
matters extending back more than half a century. 

For these reasons "World Travel" specially appeals to all 
Rotarians, because they, more than the majority of people, 
desire to encourage high standards in business and to in- 
crease the efficiency of every individual member by a 
broader outlook. They cannot fail to realize that travel — 
world-wide travel — is absolutely essential at the present 
time for business efficiency, and, although travel facilities 
have wonderfully increased, travel has become a much 
more complicated business. 

Rotarians with their families, from all parts of the world, 
will be attending the International Convention to be held 
at Ostend in June, 1927, and before leaving to attend this 
Congress they should write to 544 Market Street, San Fran- 
cisco, for particulars of an attractive series of Post Con- 
vention Tours which have been arranged by Dean & Daw- 
son, Ltd. 

( )stend is a very convenient centre for business men to 
study the industries of Belgium. Ghent is called the Man- 
chester of Belgium, Yerviers its Bradford, and Liege its 
Birmingham. Lace is manufactured largely at Brussels, and 
■hose who are interested in agriculture should visit some of 
the small holdings, the aim of which is to retain the work- 
ers on the land. 

Here is a brief outline of a delightful eight days' tour 
which starts from gay < Istend, including visits to charming 
old-world Bruges, with its historic belfry immortalized by 
Longfellow; Brussels, the gay and bright little capital of 
Belgium ; and the Ardennes region which is one of (In- 
most romantic in Europe with its shady forests and wind- 
ing rivulets, and its soft outlines ami wooded hilltops. At 
Louvain, which was sacked dining the War, a new building 
is being erected to replace the old library, and many valua- 
ble books have already been presented. Liege is essentiallj 
an industrial city, noted for its engineering works, hut it 
lias also main fine buildings. 

Then in the valley of the Metise there are Xainur, a well- 
built and picturesquely situated town, and Dinant, over- 
hung with limestone cliffs, crowned by a citadel which com- 
mands a wide view of tin- valley, in the neighbourhood 
arc the famous grottoes of I Ian. some of the most wonderful 
stalactite caverns in the world, Dinant is a capital centre lor 
■siting in the forest district of the Ardennes, anil for man) 
■farming excursions. The return to Brussels is via N'amur. 
Cenappc, the historic field of Waterloo, and the Bois de 
S, ijgnes. 

Ibis tour offers a combination of scenic beauty and his- 
toric interest which should make a verv wide ap] 

Apart from the Convention at Ostend, Rotarians can 
book to any part of the world, through I 'can & Daw 
organization, who charge nothing for their services, i-suing 
tickets at the same fares as those charged by the com] 
and reserving accommodations at the same rates as those 
charged by the hotel proprietors. But in addition to this, 
travellers can always obtain free information and free ad- 
vice in "World Travel." 



A Poor Substitute 

The fellow who indulges in hot air usual 
Boston Transcript. 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



583 Post Strbbt 
In Vircinia Hotel 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Sam Funcisc* 
Phone Franklin 2510 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established 1804 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

353 TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Dougl&a 3084 



s steam.— 



SPECIAL MIXED 

GLADIOLUS BULBS 

$3.00 per 100 

S. F. SEED and BULB CO. 

147 Fifth Street, San Francisco 
Phone Sutter 4494 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1»71 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgtttt 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2342 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1927 




ACCORDING to the report of General Manager W. K. 
Etter of the Santa Fe. that company will expend for gen- 
eral improvements in 1927. approximately $67,000,000. Of 
this sum $27,500,000 will he set aside for general additions and 
betterments, including 60 new locomotives. Initial equipment 
purchases will consist of 3.200 new freight cars. 58 passenger 
cars and 3 gas electric cars, the latter for branch line operation. 



— The San Francisco Stock and Fond Exchange is now 
second only to that of New York in the volume of business. 
••Finance and Trade" says: "The fact is that the buyer and 
seller of securities can handle his business through any one of 
the San Francisco brokerage houses or bond houses that main- 
tain brokerage department more promptly than by direct wire 
to New York and enjoy better facilities and more individual 
attention than if he were in New' York itself. ' 



— The Board of Directors of the Pacific Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company have voted to increase the capital stock of the 
company from'?13?,000.000 to 8185.000,000, through the issu- 
ance of additional common stock at par. 

* * * 

— That there is a general tendency to reduce accidents in 
industrial employment appears from the report of the U. S. 
Department of Commerce on the very dangerous occupation of 
quarrying. The death rate was a little higher than last year, 
which is a purely accidental circumstance, but the injury rate 
was markedly less and shows a better control of men and 
material. 

— Five new companies have been granted permits to sell 
stock by the Corporation Commissioner. Two of the companies 
are located in the Ventura fields and a third is located in the 
Huntington Beach field. The other two are organized t" en- 
gage in the general oil business. 

— Of the key industries the steel industry has made a good 
record in 1926. Production set a new- record, probably in excess 
of 47.000 tons, according to the estimates .if the National City 
P,ank of New York. 1 ne year closed without accumulations of 
stocks, which would appear to imply that there will he a steady 
demand during the present year. 

* * * 

— Competition i-- getting keener in the automobile industry. 
There is no evidence of any real -lump, however, for the com- 
panies that have shown their ability to gauge what the public 
wants in the matter of a car there is no doubt that success is 
waiting. All the same, there will lie more than one concern 
which will find this year the critical, if not the tragical, time of 
its history. 

* * * 

—It is stated that the McFadden Hill, which seeks to enable 
national banks to compete on a more equal footing with state- 
banks by modernizing the charter powers of the former is 
essential to the preservation of the Federal Reserve System 
which system is now considered to he the verj basis id" our 
prosperity. 

* * * 

— W. C. Tesche, speaking to the Commonwealth ( lul, lately 
pointed out that there are 135 instructors in agriculture in this 
State, growing from a director and one assistant in twelve 
years. 1 he cost of the service has grown to $900,000 a year 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,550,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $565 000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

1'ARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

11AICHT STREET BRANCH Hnreht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4J per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Cnpitnl $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Renerve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL, BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued. CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY - , MEXICO. 

San Francisco Ofllce: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COVLTHaRD 

Mannger AsHt. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer! of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



San Frniicl.se.>, Calif. 
444 Market Street 



Los Angjeles, Calif. 
5717 Santa Fe Avenue 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS - AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYounc Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 
208 Crocker Bnlldine (Opposite Palace Hotel). Sun FrnnrUco 



Phone Kearny 391 



January 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



HAVE WE NO TENEMENTS? 
By Eleanore F. Ross 

More- time than 1 can remember, people Erom large East- 
ern cities have remarked to me, after describing conditions 
of poverty in their own towns. "But, of course, you have no 
tenements in San Francisco!" and I, like numerous other 
proud natives, accepted this statement as a fact. 

Rather recently, a friend and I, always lured by the fascin- 
ation of Meiggs Wharf, wandered down through "Little 
Italy" towards North Point street, and came upon that 
ftmble-down rookery called the "Cuneo Flats." f had heard 
if them before; a settlement worker had given me vivid 
stories of the sordidness, the grime, the poverty stricken 
;onditions of its tenants; whole families crowded together 
in one room ; babies being born while their sisters and 
Bothers looked curiously on ; drunken fathers snoring near 
jy ; all the disgusting- annals of the very poor. 

We looked up at the grim walls of this old brown ram- 
shackle, and tried to picture the dramas taking place within. 
Dn one of the narrow porches, an Italian girl stood, un- 
cempt, black hair blowing in the wind, black eyes looking 
Dver our heads to some unsolved, un-wanted future. She 
night have posed for the statue of Tragedv. 

"To think that children must grow up in that place!" My 
iriend said, after an eloquent silence. 

Last Sunday night this block, bounded by North Point, 
Leavenworth and Bay streets, caught fire, and two fisher- 
Men were burned to death. The flats house more- than 500 
Italians, and scores of women and children were rescued by 
leroic efforts. 

It is a structure that was condemned ten years ago. 

At that time, Fire Chief Thomas Murphy made a recom- 
mendation to the Board of Works for the abolition of this 
nenace, but it was not acted upon. 

"The building is of flimsy construction." says Chief Mur- 
jhy, "with narrow stairways and halls, through which two 
jeople cannot pass together. When it was last surveyed it 
<vas found that the ages of the people living in it ranged 
'mm ten days to ninety years, which means that in the event 
if fire there must he dozens at the mercy of the flames, 
lowerlcss to assist themselves. 

"Unless the newspapers conduct a campaign to have 
hesc and similar tenements removed, it will he simply a 
natter of reverting to the old routine, in this case — the 
buildings will he repaired, families will crowd into them 
gain and they will continue to he a menace to the safet) 
•>{ hundreds of people." 

This is an existing evil that is not only up to the press 
■ abolish, but up to different organi; ations, clubs, churches. 
wealthy citizens or our "fair city" i" investigate and de- 
-trov. whenever possible. 

Front pages of the daily papers are given over, for months 
it a time, to scandalous drivel regarding publicity-crazed 
fcrsons like Aimee McPherson, "Teaches" Browning and 
ler mate. After the first flare up of a tragedy such as the 
.'unco Flats tire, public interest dies down, like the 
tself. and the affair is forgotten until a similar one occurs. 

\\ Inn will the world come to the conclusion that the lives 
if its poor arc of more importance than the amorous inti- 
macies of crazy evangelists, or the marital immoralities of 
lo.ldering old men and their "child-wives?" 



Price of Patriotism 
Mayme (on crowded trolley-car) — "Wotcha got in that 

Hckage, Sadie?" 
Sadie "< me o' them portable radios." 
Mayme "Chee! If you can tune in 'The Stai 

tanner' mebbe we can git a scat." — Life. 



Prominent Attorney Passes 

Edward !•'. Moran, for twenty years an active figure in 
San Francisco's legal and commercial circles, passed away 
at his home in Grove street last week. 

Moran was formerly president of the tied Service Com 
mission and Spent several years in the newspaper business, 
lie edited the San Francisco News Letter for quite a period 
m the early nineties, and was a writer of force ami versatil- 
ity. He was a member of many clubs, including the ( llym- 
pic, Press, Elks, Metropolitan and Native Soils. One or 
Ramsay, Assistant Public Defender, and three sisters, 
Dorothy, Mary and Angela Moran, survive. 



Tickling Teacher's Ear 

Teacher — "Willie, can you name a city in Alaska?" 

Willie — "No' m'm." 

"Correct." — Christian Science Monitor. 




Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

T /hos£Keat Sh1rts 'JhosEKencf 

%W? "SSrK. ^HM^ 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Keauny 3714 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel— 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th SU.. 

San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29, 1027 



AUTOMATIC SHUT-OFF SWITCH 

For Direction Signals 

(Patented April 6, 1925. Other Patents Pending) 





LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. 



PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 



LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 
PuMt and Franklin Streets Son Francisco, Cal 



Direction signals that show whether the driver intends 
to turn to the right or left are necessary in some states. 
California law requires their use when the window on the 
driver's side is closed, when the hand and arm signal is 
obstructed by load or body of the automobile, and on all 
cars with right-hand drive. 

Installation of any direction signal adds greatly to the 
comfort of closed car operation, as the window may be left 
closed in all kinds of weather — on rainy or foggy nights, or 
during the cold season. 

Such signals have not yet become popular because of the 
cumbersome controls that have been offered. To be effec- 
tive, the contact between the driver and the signal must be 
simple and effective in operation. 

The Direction Switch shown in the photograph shuts off 
after a turn is made. It is designed to be used in combina- 
tion with any direction signal to indicate right and left turns. 

The switch box is installed close up under the steering 
wheel hub. and is clamped to the post of the steering- wheel 
on the right-hand side. A convenient hand lever is moved 
in the direction it is intended to turn, before the turn is 
made. The law in California requires that the signal be 
shown fifty feet before the turn is made. After the turn is 
completed, the automatic device shuts the switch off. bring- 
ing the handle back to neutral. A shut-off arm is bolted to 
the hub of the steering wheel, and engages with a finger 
that extends from the switch box when the handle is thrown 
into left or right position. This finger is clearly visible in 
the picture, which shows the switch in the position for a 
right-hand turn. 

The switch box is die cast aluminum, solidly constructed. 
The insulation is die cast bakelite, and the contact arms are 
made of German silver. The switch is built of the best 
materials obtainable, and carries an unqualified guarantee 
on materials and workmanship for one year. Test switches 
have been operated 200.000 times on the test block, which 
is equivalent to ten years' life on the automobile. 

The Automatic shut-off switch is finished complete ready 
for installation, but without wiring, which is usually fur- 
nished with the signal. Price $4.00, at The Safetv House, 
Inc., 1157 Post St., San Francisco. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates: 35o per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles 



Graystone 130 

SHERWOOD 



Open Day avA Night 

GARAGE 



Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 
EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 
Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing, Oiling, Greasing, Washing and Polishing 
Gasoline : Oils Sundries 



1140 GEARY ST. 




TEL. GRAYSTONE 4200 



Metal Work Apper- 
taining to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding — Dlack- 
smithlng. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



Scientific Cleanliness rules at 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



"The Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St., Sa\ Francisco 



'Phone Market 916 



[anuary 29, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 







By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 
Nntionnl Automobile <'liil> 



IN THE belief that good roads tend 
to increase industry and commerce 
ind develop a better understanding bc- 
:ween communities, the Republic of 
Mexico is pursuing a strenuous pro- 
Sam of highway development involv- 
ng more than a million dollars a 
nonth. 

President Calles lias appointed a b'eil- 
:ral Highway Commission and the first 
itep in road finance taken by this body 
,vas to create a new tax on gasoline and 
tobacco which will bring in twelve mil- 
ion pesos per year, all of which will 
ie expended on highway improvement, 

A delegation was sent by Mexico to 
he Road Show of the American Road 
Builders' Association and foreign en- 
gineers were called in to assist the na 
tire executives in devising ways and 
mans for the rapid extension of the 
Mexican Highway system. 

A general plan of construction was 
aid out and machinery including gi id 
irs, tractors, rollers, trucks, steam- 
shovels, oil-tanks, air-compressors, etc. 
was purchased. The roads were di- 
vided into sections of approximately 
twenty miles, each section in charge 
if a technical staff. Each section also 
had its own construction camp and 
Work begun on the route between Mex- 
ico t'ltv and Puebla. 

This road is about one hundred miles 
in length with forty miles through 
mountainous country. The highest 
portion of the road was ten thousand 
feet in elevation. Thousands ^>i work- 
men were employed at a standard wage 
of $1.5(1 per day. 



The entile stretch of road was com- 
pleted last Fall and it now ranks as one 
of the great scenic highways of the 
world. (In leaving Mexico' City the 
road crosses Texcoco Lake and follows 
a splendid boulevard lined with tall 
trees to the foot id' the mountains. The 
road then ascends rapidly with panor- 
amic vistas of snow capped volcanic 
peaks, the great valley of Mexico, and 
the quiet silver sheet of the lake below. 

From the summit the road winds 
down the Llano grade to the Gulf of 
Mexico over a different type of surface, 
offering new aspects and new attrac- 
tions to the tourists. The road passes 
through quaint native villages and 
great farming lands and ends at the im- 
portant industrial town of Puebla. 

Although not as scenic as the Puebla 
route, the highway between Mexico 
City and I'achuca is an important link 
of the federal system as it connects the 
capital with the mining districts. 

These two roads, the first of Mexico's 
new highway program under President 
Calles, were opened to traffic last fall 
and the effect has already been noticed 
in an increase of motor travel. The 
gasoline tax brought in an increased 
revenue of twenty-live per cent im- 
mediately following the opening of 
these two links. 



Santa Cruz good road enthusiasts are 
expressing satisfaction at the news that 
the Slate Highway commission has 
recommended the abolition of the Sar- 
geant railroad crossing and the further 
grading and paving of the Pacheco 
Pass road east of Gilroy. This will 
greatly increase travel to Santa Cruz 
over the Pacheco Pass route from Mo- 
desto, Madera, Merced Fresno, Bakers- 
field, and all valley points. 

* * * 

( Ine of the worst turns on the road 
which connects Santa Cruz, with the 
Big Basin highway, between Felton 
and Ben Lomond, will be removed 
upon completion of the new bridge now 
under construction al Brackriey. The 
bridge will be completed early in Feb- 
ruary according to latest reports. 

* * * 

(her one thousand American Legion 
members are expected to participate in 
the first annual "pilgrimage" of the 
Hi $ S which will be held at the Ca-a del 
Key. Santa Cruz. April 30th and May 
1-t. accroding to recent decision of the 
state organization. There will be no 
business sessions at this gathering, 
which will be devoted entirely to fun. 
An illuminated parade, barbecue, dance, 
beach sporl program, swimming meet, 
golf and tennis tournament and fish- 
ing expeditions are planned for the en- 
tertainment of the visiting legionnaires. 



ay us a visit 

We seek consumers' 
counsel and advice. Do not 
hesitate to offer sugges- 
tions for the improvement 
of your service. Construc- 
tive criticism helping to 
make Pacific Service a pop- 
ular service is always wel- 
come. 

PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"rACIFIC SERVICE" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.SOO.OOO cupa were served at the 

Pa nam 11 -Pacific International Expoallla 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 29. 1922 




T N h a e me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



1 



PHONES: 
San Francisco — 
West 793 



Burlingame 

478 



Phone Sutter 3278 

William Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 
San Mateo Counties 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: PALO ALTO OFFICE: 

~iT. 818 EMERSON St. 

Phone i 

Kearny 644-645 Palo alto 315-j 

SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
(Continued from Page 14) 
Cameo 

Tom Mix starring in "Hard Boiled" 
and Mabel Norrrtand, the heroine in 
"Ragged)- Rose" form the double bill 
features to lie shown on the screen at 
the popular Cameo theater beginning 
Saturday and continuing for four days. 

Both pictures provide thrills and ex- 
citing romance with Tom Mix. in his 
role that has endeared him to thou- 
sands of motion-picture fans. 

"Eagle of the Sea," one of the most 
spectacular photoplays of cinema pro- 
ductions will be shown on Wednesday 
running for three days. The principals 
of this photoplay are Florence Vidor 
and Ricardo Cortez. With the show- 
ing of the feature pictures the Cameo 
has a number of the most recent news 
reels and several comedy films to aug- 
ment their attractive programs. 



Mine. Marie de Mare Stein will speak 
on "Artistic and Literary J'aris of the 
Eighties," with particular emphasis on 
Marie Bashkirtseft, in the Paul Elder 
Gallery, Saturday afternoon, January 
29th, at 2:30 o'clock. Always "intellec- 
tually stimulating, Mme. de Mare 
Stein's reviews of French literature -and 
social and historical periods are of fas- 
cinating interest — subtle interpreta- 
tions delivered with rare delicacy anil 
charm. She is a Parisian, educated in 
Paris and Fontainebleau. 

A exhibition of Oils and Water Col- 
ors by John F.mmett Gerrity will be 
shown in the Paul Elder Gallery for 
two weeks, beginning Monday, Jan- 
uary 24th. Gerrity's paintings can be 
said to be a development of western art 
which leans toward the oriental and 
which many believe will eventually lie 
known as an important phase of 
American art. 

ASSESSMENT 1VOT1CE 
THE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. 

location of principal place of business. San 
Francisco. Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 18th day 
of January. 1927, an assessment of one-hall 
cent per share was levied upon the issued 
capital stock of the corporation payable im- 
mediately in legal money of the United Stales, 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 
Room 21",, Monadnock Building, .San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 24th day of February. 
1927 will lie delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will lie sold on Thursday the 
24th day of March. 1927 to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEEL,Y. Secretary, 
245 Monadnock Building, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

\ N MAI, MKETIXfi 
THE JOSHUA BENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be held at the office of the corporation, No. 
7."i Fremont Street, San Francisco, California, 
on Tuesday, the 8th day of February, 1M27, at 
the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., fur the purpose 
of electing a Board 'if Directors to Serve lor 
the ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meet- 
ing. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER, 
r „, Secretary. 

Office: 75 Fremont Street, 
San Francisco, California. 







N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Oince and Works 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7813 
Branch Oflice: 700 Sntter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 
Phone Prospect 9845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

Where Good Tailoring 
Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal, 
Sport and Business wear is now 
ready for your early considera- 
tion. 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
0pp. olympic club 



USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone GarOeld 3852 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASUN 

Phone Prospect 61 

«cREVUE^ 

Nightly 

THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Moil Di.linclive Oriental Show Pl.ce 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

50c, 73c, S1.00 33c. 50c, 75c tl.00.Sl.50 a la Carl. 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m, 

363 Sutler Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

special parties arranged 

headquarters for theatrical people 

Hattie Mooseb Minnie C. Moose* 



£teanors 



145 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



A quiet, home-like place, where the 
service is dainty and the prices 
reasonable. Every day: Breakfast. 
Luncheon, Afternoon Tea, Dinner. 
Sundays: Dinner. 




Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

334 Sutter St. Douclas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

fntTroom!!' tnrt 1} \ m ' '2 2 p ' m - < a la c « rte >- Private <Jln- 
' ' for banquets and partlea, seatlne 76 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 






O'Farrell and 
Larktn Sti. 



Wr.kdaTi, 



Luncheon _. 

(11 JO to 2 p. in I 
Dinner. Week Day, and Sondayi ..... 1.50 



BLANCO'S 

......$ .75 



Phone 
Gray stone 8100 



No Vi.ilor Should Leave the Cily With- 
out Dlttlng in the Fine*! Cafe 
in America 



Our Main Dining Room it open afoin on Sundays. 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



Featuring Southern Cookine 
Open From 
11 SO a. m. to 2:00 p. ra. 
5:S0 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 



l>.1 Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 



CLOSED EVERY' MOXDAV 
Hnll lllock from Hicrhvray 






HMni Hoi .« 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 1 

Restaurant 

OPEN SKKI A. M. TO HOC P. M. 

t \>t KtM-srn ct i-ive 
Carl Lbonhardt 

Formerly of Clden i.xtf P.rk Ca*ino 



ICE CREAM Y \ 
CANDY 
PASTRY 




BREAKFAST 

f POLK £ CALIFORNIA STS LUNCHEON 
DINNER 






^ggg # 



LA CASA BIGIN 

■Ml STOCKTON STREET ( lly the Tunnel I 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 



Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 
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Telephone 110 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

cub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



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French nnd Italian Dinners — Men Is at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Street -Garfield HU 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 
980-82 Flood Building. Powell and Market Sts, San Francuco t 
Phone Garfield 5394 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that n \icnntui hru-ii inc once or t it ice a day la 

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J decay. Are your teeth wore? Do your pmi bleed f Call In today 

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DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy), San Francisco, Calif, j 

Plum.- Garfield MS 
SPECIALISTS — Extraction!.: troirn.: SeM CleulmS Brldce.: J 



Porcelain Work and Itoofle** Plates 



I 




REMOVABLE CARRIER 

Can be left at home when not in use. Built to carry a half ton if necessary. Made of cold rolled steel. 

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RHAMSHORN REPLACEMENT HEADLAMPS 

TRIPLELITE RADIATOR CAPS AND ORNAMENTS 

BROWN REFLECTORS CLOSED CAR WINGS 

FYRAC SPOTLIGHT STOP SIGNALS 

AUTO REELITE MIRRORS 

SPHINX GAS RESERVE SMOKE SETS 

THE SAFETY HOUSE, Inc. 

"Automobile Safety Essentials" 

1157 Post St., near Van Ness Ave., Phone Graystone 120 



SAILTO NEW YORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



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TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
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Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
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The cost is less than S9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
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Mail liners leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days Next 
sailings from San Francisco: SS COLOMBIA. February V) ; SS VENEZUELA 
March 12. From Los Angeles two days later. Westward from New York- SS 
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For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or write to 



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LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 




'A Six-pointer" 



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Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
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bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



L 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 



KAUIU FKUGKAMS.rOKNfcXl WEEK, IN 1 HIS ISSUE 



■■■■ 




£5.00 PER YEAR 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Saturday February 5, 1927 



LOS ANGELES 




S Will'!. KAHN 
Executive I 'ice-President 




The present fleet of the Golden Gate 
Ferry Company, operating between San 
Francisco and Sausalito. 

On Wednesday, Feb. 2nd. the Golden 
Gate Jerry Company launched their new 
electrically driven ferry boat, "Golden 
Bear." which trill ply between San Fran- 
cisco and Berkeley, beginning in June. 

Details of launching will be found on 
Page 21. 




Established July 20, 1856 



SAN "igplSCo 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast ; ^ 

Fit. San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1856, by Frederick Marriott. Published by Frederick Marriott, 

(r.. from 1SS4 to 1S25. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 26S Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

relephone Kearny S357. Entered at .San Francisco. California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C., 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year, $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



v'ol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 5, 1927 



No. 6 



FAIR PLAY 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



AMERICA, so it would seem to a "100 per cent Ameri- 
an." has always stood for fair play, internationally, 
wwever provincial we may be, in our dealings with our 
)wn people. Especially have we shown a breadth of vision, 
i tolerance, a generosity in the great question of War. 

It would seem that the national spirit of the United States 
s one which deplores war; which exercises patience and 
:ries to arbitrate until it is literally forced into War. Not 
hat pride and patriotism are ever lacking in the make-up 
)f the Nation; not that resentment of interference plays no 
lart in our character; but America strives, first of all. to be 
just, to weigh and consider all sides of an international ques- 
:ion, before she embroils herself in that last resort of a still 
larbarous world, — War! 

Nations have an individuality that may be modified. 
Ranged slightly, almost imperceptibly, as centuries roll 
Bound; time mellows crudeness; experience soitcns intol- 
erance; immigration brings new conditions; but the poly- 
glot which constitutes America, and which is continually 
Deing stirred up and added to, by foreign ingredients, re- 
rains, through all sorts of adverse conditions, that distinc- 
:ivc trait which characterized the founders of our great. 
:ountr\ , — Fair Play. 

It was adherence to this dominant principle which drove 
.is ultimately into the great World War against a country 
toward which, primarily, we had no ill feeling. Even the 
most prejudiced reasoning in the world, can hardly show 
what connection the national policy of the United State- ol 
America had with the assassination of an archduke of 
Austria. 

But sparks ignite and grow into monstrous holocausts. 
Hid when eventually, America realized that the devilish war 
machine of German) was grinding down like a juggernaut 
the helpless nations under its iron heel; was destroying 
,-i\ ilization itself, our country came forward with its men 
Kd millions to carry out the doctrine by which it has lived. 

There are people who argue that we went int.' the war 
lor selfish purposes, ami when asked what those pur] 
■ere, the) repiy; "To make a few more millionaires in the 
United Slates." 

The old saying that "It is an ill wind that bloweth no one 
good." max- be applied to even such hideous cataclysi 
war. but the few men who profited by our entry into the 
laughter are a mere bagatelle compared to the millions who 
pffered thereby; the) do not stack up strongly enough to 
fcng an argument upon, and can be classed as incidental 
rather than instrumental in the general scheme of thi 

The fact remains that we went into the war with no 
Bought of gain, either in money, territory, power or vain- 
■ory: that we gave our men. our manufactories, our ships, 
our earnings, to succor Europe, and for that sacrifice every 



man and woman in America has been taxed and is being 
taxed today. 

Waiving .all sentiment, all biased arguments regarding 
our reason for this sacrifice on the part of America, we find 
ourselves face to face with problems created by that welcher 
of the allies, — France ! 

If we were a country of 100 per cent Americans, such a 
problem as France's non-payment of our loan might be set- 
tled speedily; hut we are a nation of "pro's" and there is 
ever an influential foreign element to be contended with. 

Some of these "pro's" have dragged up the falsehood that 
we never repaid the advances France made up during the 
Revolutionary War. 

"A Sketch of the Finances of the United States," written 
in 1796 by Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury, 1801- 
1814, give's the following information : 

"( In December 31. 17X9, our debt to France, including ac- 
cumulated interest amounted to $7,895,300.33. Our pay- 
ments of interest and principal from 17 ( K) to 1795 amounted 
to $7,151,896.53. On January 1. 1796, in order to close the 
account of the funded debt, we issued to France $2,024,900 
worth of bonds, all of which we paid in full, with interest. 
That made a total payment to France of $'U 76,796.53." 

We were a small country in those days; in 1791 we num- 
bered only 3,231,000 population, and 697,000 slaves. Our 

country was just organized, we were poor and heavily 
taxed ; compelled to maintain an army with which to protect 
ourselves against the Indians. We had no foreign commerce 
to speak of and few manufactures. But we paid France in 
full. 

We are asking France to pay only that part of her debt 
loaned after the war. 

France's wealth today is at least fifty billion dollars; she- 
ilas a population of forty million people at home and sixty 
million in her colonies. ' But the "pro's" in America claim 
that she cannot begin repaying her debt to us at the moder- 
ate rate of S.iO.OOO.'OOO a year. 

At the time we paid France we had no resources with 
which to meet our payments. France, today, beside all her 
riches and great foreign commerce, has a war idemnity 
' .crmany over twice as great as the total payments 
France is to make to the United Mates and England to- 
gether. 

How can the most prejudiced of "pro's" find any similar- 
ween our situation at the time of the Revolutionary 
War and the present condition of France? Between France's 
pressure upon us for payment, only seven months after our 
peace treaty was signed with England, and the leniency we 
haw displayed since the Armistice? Between the country 
that welshes, ami the country that stands, fundamentally. 
for Fair Play? 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1927 




After all, we are largely influenced by words. 
Big Words Something comes along and we give it a 
name. Thenceforward we are bound by the 
Sound of that name, as much as anything else. Political 
battles occur and actual wars are fought with nothing be- 
hind them more than the sound of the words. We need only 
point to such an expression as "self determination" which 
was the dominating American term of the Great War, and 
which was an instrument of death to thousands of young 
Americans. 

Now, a new term is coming into our political life, one 
which has already been worn threadbare across the At- 
lantic, but which by virtue of its very use carries with it 
strange significances. That is the word "imperialism." To 
call a government "imperalistic" is the crowning term of 
abuse, upon which politicians rely to make an impression 
which their mere reasoning could never effect. 

What is this "imperialism," the content of which is so 
terrifying and what does "imperialism" mean to a good 
American? It surely does not mean dictatorial govern- 
mental powers, for those are aberrations which we leave the 
communists and Mussolini to play with. It does not mean 
acquisition of foreign territory, for there is no such desire 
on the part of any group in this country. When we come 
down to actual cases, what does it signify to an American ? 

It means no more than the right of an American citizen 
to safely invest his property abroad, if he so wishes, and to 
enjoy personal safety and property security in the country 
which he has chosen as the field of his investment. Can one 
ask less than that? As the President says, Americans in 
China have the right to protection of their lives and prop- 
erty. Is there any one who will dispute that statement? 
Yet that is all that "imperialism" means. 



Just now, the legislators have taken a 
The Full Basket recess of thirty days within which they 
are to consider all the various bills 
which have been presented to the legislature to be enacted 
into law at the coming talk-fest. Therein lies a piece of con- 
scious humbuggery. It is intended to convey the impression 
that the legislators, during this period, will carefully study 
these bills and report to their own intellects and consciences 
regarding them. 

As a matter of fact, they will do nothing of the sort. ( >ne 
will return to his farm and another to his merchandise, and 
the greater number, each to his law office, there to seek 
counsel from the people, who pull his particular wires, as 
to how he shall vote on the measures in question. Indeed, 
the vast majority will not even do that. They will await 
the instructions of their particular overlords as" to the way 
in which they shall vote, when the measure comes up. As 
for their thinking, — one need only to read the list of meas- 
ures to discover how far remote such cerebral activity is 
from the possibilities of legislators in general. 

The list of measures is appalling; it covers every element 
of life from merely social behavior to legal intricacies, the 
like of which could not be understood by the great majority 
of the representatives; nothing is too large and nothing is 
too small. One legislator dabbles in such controversial mat- 
ters as the relation of evolution to the Pentateuch, another 
puts his plea in for some niggling regulation of automobile 
traffic. 

As a matter of fact, there is an enormous waste of good 
paper in all this proposed legislation. We are prosperous; 



we have a good government. The business of the legisla- 
ture is to keep us prosperous and free, and it can do that 
best by doing as nearly nothing as possible. 



Last week we had a good word 
A Sagacious Governor for the Governor. This week we 
have another good word. That is 
quite wonderful; we do not remember praising a ( iovernor 
for two weeks running. If this keeps up we shall lose all 
our critical faculty and become merely optimistic. Last week 
it was the budget. This week it has to do with the budget 
but on quite other grounds. We are praising the (iovernor, 
because he shows the proper appreciation of the value of 
education to the State. 

If we were to answer the question as to the most im- 
portant thing in the State, we should say at once — educa- 
tion. If we have an educated community, whatever happens, 
we can meet it. It is true that just now our education, even 
in the lowest branches, is not what it should be. We have 
an illiteracy which places us far below the mark of self- 
respect. That is not altogether our fault, for we have taken 
upon ourselves to raise a certain proportion of low grade 
people to the level of self-respecting informed citizens, and 
that is no childish contract. So, it is with great pleasure that 
we note the effort of the (iovernor to raise the educational 
opportunities and to provide better chances for numbers ot 
our people who have not that access to the teacher which 
is for the best interests of the community. 

The loss of Will C. Wood to the Board of Education is 
almost irreparable. To change the schools for the bank does 
not seem to us a step upwards. This is said without any 
criticism to Mr. Wood, who has placed his remarkable abili- 
ties at the service of education in the State for a long time 
for most inadequate returns. We are given to understand, 
however, that his successor is well qualified and will give 
good service. 

This attention to the educational needs of the State 
stamps the new Governor as a statesman. 



The end of the carpenters' strike 
Stupidity Vanquished which was never a strike, and for 
the most part was a mere demon 
stration of vicious hoodlumism, is a triumph of the forces 
of good order and marks the end of the period in this city 
during which ruffianism was intended to take the place 0| 
reasoning and good feeling. 

Xow the strike is over and the principle that a man has 
still the right, independent of group interference, to m-" 
his labor in the open market, has been fully vindicated. The 
American plan, which is nothing more than the recognition 
of the property of the individual in his own labor-power, is 
still the dominant feature of San Francisco economic life. 

But now that the strike i- over and there is a feeling that 
industrial peace will prevail for many years in this com- 
munity, we must remember that this is a shifting world and 
that things never do remain the same for long. It must not 
be imagined that with the advent of this new state of things! 
there will be a cessation of organization on the part of laboi 
or capital. The only thing that has been determined, is thai 
brutality shall not prevail to settle questions of industril 
employment. To see how much we have gained by this de- 
cision one has only to go {,, Chicago. We have stepped fa! 
ahead of that tempestuous town. 

It is very clear that labor will have to produce leaders J 
much better calibre than hitherto, if they are to meet the 
situation in terms of modern life. There is a great deficiency 
of brains in labor leadership today ; such a deficiency as max 
be termed stupidity. We need ability on both side- of the 
controversy if we are to progress steadily in our civic dj 
veh ipment. 



February 5, 1921 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS EETTER 



We are proud of our State and its hi-- 
California History tory. There are few states with the 

background of poetry and romance 
which we possess and in that history we have a legacy most 

precious, one that can be transmitted to our descendants, 
with confidence that it will produce those splendid results 
in art and literature which proceed only from ancestral and 
traditional legend. 

Yet. this State, as a community, has shown a very great 
indifference to its own history and has failed to provide any 
official agency for collecting historical material, so that 
much that would have been of the greatest value has been 
lost and people whose knowledge of the past was invaluable 
have died without any record of their activities in the earlier 
period of our history. 

Now there are two bills before the Legislature for the for- 
mation of a State Historical Society and making- provision 
for its support. It is not our habit to encourage state activ- 
ity in these directions. It is much perferable in many ways, 
that private societies of interested people should take this 
task upon their own shoulders. Failing the existence of such 
a group, however, the State should take up the matter, since 
the material must be preserved and arranged or lost for- 
ever. This would be intolerable. 

Most of the Eastern states maintain historial societies for 
the purpose of saving and arranging historical documents 
and they have also private societies for the same purpose. 
Professor Bolton of the University of California has done 
magnificent work in preserving and collecting material on 
our early Spanish history. The State should supplement his 
efforts. ' 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



It would appear as if this government 
Our Good Example were going to set a good example in 

China and that, owing to this stand. 
we seem to expect that the period of spoliation of the 
Chinese (in which we have no part), will be ended. No in- 
clination is shown on the part of i iur g< i\ eminent, to acti \ civ 
take part in any warlike measure against the Chinese. This 
statement of intention has had a very marked effect upon 

the British. 

< )f course, we have no concessions in China for which 
some of our privileged concessionaires might feel inclined 
to light. ( >ur only object is the presen atioii of our nationals 
from attacks upon life and property. Britain, on the other 
hand, has many concessions which have been taken from 
the Chinese at one time or another, either as war settle- 
ments or b) clever and occasionally selfish diplomacy. Now, 
however, there appears to he a tendency on the part ol the 

British to put themselves on a parit) with ourselves and, 
waiving the concessions which they may actually surrender, 
to make the question simply one of the protection ol the 
property of their na1 ii mals. 

But the whole affair is filled with uncertainty. It rests 
primarily upon the ability of the t antonesi armies to defeat 
their opponents and l>\ that means to make themselves mas- 
ters of China There is little doubt that if China actually be- 
comes united, owing to the victor) of the Cantonese armies, 
the entire Chinese problem will have changed and the bully- 
ing tone heretofore employed towards the Chinese will have 
to be considerably modified. 

This country can play a splendid and humane part in set- 
tling the Chinese question. 



Not Facing the Music 

"I don't believe you love me any more," sobbed the sheba. 

"Why do you say that, dearie?" asked the sheik anxiously. 

"Well, for the last week you've left every night before 
father threatened to throw you out." — American Legion 
Monthly. 

* * # 

Get a Hook 

A little girl at dinner table was given a dish of noodles. 
The mother noticed that she was eating nothing but the 
soup, leaving the noodles. She asked her why she did not 
eat the noodles, too. 

Unconcernedly she answered, "Can't catch 'em." — Christ- 
ian Evangelist. 

jk ^: ^ 

Why Uncle Changed His Will 

"Uncle Robert, when does your football team play?" 
"Football team? What do you mean, my boy?" 
"Why, I heard father say that when you kicked off we'd 
be able to afford a big automobile." — Boston Transcript. 

* * * 

She — 'Acs, I'm a college girl, hut I've never dated, partied or 
smoked a cigarette yet." 

He — "That's fine. I low long have you been here?" 
"Three hours." 

— Boston llean Lot. 

* * * 

A conductor fears no one — he tells 'em all where to get off. 

— Ohio State Sun Dial. 

* * * 

Drunk — "Shay, where does Tom Maloney live?" 
Friend — "Why. you're Tom — old boy." 
"Shore, hut when' cl es he live.'" 

— Carnegie Puppet. 

* * * 

\ girl i- always one of three things: hungry, thirsty, or both. 

— Litt Panther. 

* * * 

First Student — "Good Gosh! they're advertising shoe shines 
now fm- five cents, let'- gel one." 

Second Student — "Aw. they're probably no good, ami be- 
sides 1'vegol on mj roommate's shoes." 

— Alabama Rammer Jammer. 

* * * 

Judge — "You admit that you ran over tin- man. drove 
around the block and ran over him again'" 
Driver — "Yes, your honor." 
"What have you to say in your defense?" 
"1 didn't know I got him the first time.' 

— Steven- Stone Mill. 

* * * 

"Waiter — pleasll brig me a dish pruncsli." 

"Stewed, sir?" 

"Shut your mouth and get the prunesh." 

— Illinois Siren. 

* * * 

See if you can laugh that one off." said the fat man's wife 
as -In- wired a button on his vest." — 1'enn Punch Bowl. 



Redw I City's new electric substation i- finished at a 

co-t of a quarter of a million, hour supply line- cuter this 
station; two from San Francisco and two from Newark, 
the latter tying in with the great hydro-electric plants. 



The East is coining more and more to the Pacific ' 
and the Southwest to g t -t talc for beauty culture and marble 
to decorate its sky scrapers. There are o\er 800 private 
properties holding commercial minerals in Cali- 

fornia. Utah, Nevada. Arizona and New Mexico 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1927 




LE/ISURE'SW^ND 




OBEY NO \aJAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

Tom Woore. 




Music and Motion Pictures 

THAT orchestrations have much 
to do with the standards of mo- 
tion picture productions is most con- 
vincingly brought to mind this past 
week at the Curran Theater, where the 
great photoplay, "What Price Glory," 
is now being shown. 

Earl Schwartz, leader of the Sym- 
phony Orchestra, has arranged the or- 
chestrations which visualize the story, 
itself ; while, on the other hand, the 
musical interpretations are so placed 
and so played that they seem to fairly 
melt into the theme. 

The Curran orchestra is certainly an 
indispensable part of the wonderful 
picture now being screened for the final 
week at the Curran Theater. 

ip if if 

War Picture Contains 
Poignant Philosophy 

"Why do they put war pictures on 
the screen ?" inquired a credulous one, 
who, unfortunately, has missed "What 
Price Glory?" 

"If more pictures like the William 
Fox production were screened these 
days, perhaps there would be clearer 
understanding of* the utter senseless- 
ness of war," emphatically declared the 
knowing one. "What good do war pic- 
tures do? Well, read the significant 
sub-titles written by Malcom Stuart 
Boylan, at the Curran Theater this 
week, and you will see what this great 
America needs to impart fearlessly and 
consistently," replied Intelligence. 

"What Price Glory" is more than a 
motion picture. It is rare philosophy 
seasoned with radiant humor and un- 
mitigated Truth. 

No one can afford to miss it. Re- 
member this is the last week, begin- 
ning Monday, February 7. 

if if * 

Wilkes 

"Castles in the Air" — what an allur- 
ing title for an operetta ! 

It is an Edward D. Smith production 
with a sparkling company of lovely 
girls, young men ; youth personified, 
and a lot of resplendent song hits. 
There are a lot of dances ; and we just 
demand dances these days, all of which 
delight the eye. 

Tuneful melodies run merrily through 
"Castles in the Air" as we naturally 
would expect from the title of the mu- 
sical comedy. 



By Josephine Young 

The players and singers include 
Guy Kibbee in his rule of the butler; 
Milton Pope, playing the jester; Mar- 
garet Bourne, "Queen Mother." Fred 
Cowhick, who stages the dances has a 
lot to do with the perpetual round of 
fun. 

Eva Olivotti is a charming little per- 
son who sings delightfully and "in 
tune." Perry Askam, with his lyric 
barytone, plays opposite the heroine of 
the story. The comedian, Ray Ray- 
mond, never misses a trick, and he has 
many a new one, all his own. Then 
there is the fascinating foreign prima 
donna, Marie Wells; Charles Miller, 
David Preston, whom we all like, and 
Barney Gilmore, too. 

You'll find music, frolic, amusement 
of high degree and plenty of pep at the 
Wilkes Theater this week where "Cas- 
tles in the Air" remains for a limited 
engagement. 

if if if 

Alcazar 

One of the reasons for all of the 
Henry Duffy productions, no doubt, is 
that he never keeps any of his plays 
running at any of his string of popular 
theaters too long. After we have had a 
good relish and we like the play, thor- 
oughly, presto, Mr. Duffy provides us 
another play, "just as good, or even 
better." 

So. at the Alcazar Theater this next 
week, starting Sunday night, there will 
be another of the Duffy fun classics. It 
is called, "If I Was' Rich" — and we 
know the ungrammatical term must 
provide some of the laughter. As usual, 
this Alcazar presentation will be on a 
par with that in New York, for Henry 
Duffy has brought a number of players 
here for their initial San Francisco ap- 
pearances. 

^ Phil Tead, Helen Keers and Olive 
Cooper are well known popular Alcazar 
players; and among some of the other 
players we shall see: Westcott Clarke, 
Eunice Quedens, William Abram, 
Marie Sorille. Others in the cast in- 
clude Henry Caubisens, Frank Darien, 
Dorothy LaMar, Leo J. Christal, Gay 
Seabrook. 

"If I Was Rich" was written by 
William Anthony McGuire, author of 
any number of successful plays, includ- 
ing ''Kid Boots" and "Six-Cylinder 
Love," and is rated as one of the clev- 
erest of them all. 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 



Alcazar, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

"If I Wns Rich." Htartlng Sunday nlKlit. 
Henry DuIVy players. 



Columbia, 70 Eddy 

"Loose Ankles," \nney Carroll, Louis 
o. Macloon production. 

Curran, Geary nr. Mason 

"What Price Glory." Final week. Fox 
Production. Victor Me La glen, Kdmutid 
Lowe, Dolores Del Kio. Twice dally, 
2:30 mid 8:80 p. m. Sunday matinee, 
4:40 p. m. I 

President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Little Spittlrc." Henry Duffy 
Comedy. 

Wilkes, Geary at Mason 

"Cant lew in the Air," musical comedy. 



VAUDEVILLE 



Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

*' ■ mi ni:- April," screen lent lire — Joseph 
St hililkrant. Ilessie Love, llryant Wnsh< 
hum. 

Orpheum, O'Farrell and Powell 

Trlxie Frlgoiixn, Fmil Boreo, ltussinii 
artist; Vnl and Fruit- Stnulon; Orpheum 
Circuit Dance Itevuc. Peter Variant, 
"Pictures in the Sand." Judsou Cole, 
moiloloKTiMt. 

Pantages (New), Market at Hyde 

"Cissie" Loft us, I ui persona tor. Francis 
Renault, "Slave of Fashion." "Stage 
HadneMN," screen showing Virginia 
Vnlli. __ 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Pauline Frederick, "JosnepynVi Wife," 
beginning Saturday, with live new vau- 
deville acts. 



Wigwam, Mission and 22nd 
Vaudeville -Pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"The Gorilla Hunt," showing It en llur- 
hrldge, hunter of wild animnls in 
Africa. "The Model From Paris," llert 
l.ytell, Marcellne Day, Attllio Lara in 
and California Orchestra, 



Cameo, Market opp. 5th 



Harry Carey in "Satan Town," Sat. to 
Wed. Colored Scenes of losemltc Val- 
ley. "So's ^ our oih Man," Wed. to Sat., 
Alice Joyce and w. c. Fields. 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Double bill. Sat.. Feb. 5. "Why <;irls Go 
I tack Home." "The Transconl inental 
Limited." Double bill, Sun., Hon., Feb. 
ii and 7. "The Wise Guy" mid "The Fly- 
lug Mail." 

Granada, Market at Jones 

George ^ oung, Cat a I inn swimmer. In 
person. "Xew York," screen feature, 
Iticardo Cortex. Fddie Pcalmdy, leader 
of orchestra. Five performances a day, 

begin ning at II o'clock. 

St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 

"The Fire Brigade* 1 ' color lllms. Charles 
Hay. Mny McAvoy. 



February 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANl I SCO NEWS LETTER 



Warfield, Market nr. Taylor 

"Tile Red Mill." >liirimi Davirs, Owen 
Moore. Vaudeville stage numbers, 
W biting ami Dart. Unite Wolf leads the 
orchestra 

Hl» TOWN 



Alhambra (New), Polk and Green 

"Taxi-Taxi." Sat. anil Son., Feb. •"► and 
<;. Edward Everett Horlon, Marian 
Nixon. "The Quarterback," Mon, Toes., 
v. ed„ Richard lit*. "The Eagle of the 
Sen." Tluirs. and Fri.. Feh. 10 and 11, 
Florence Y'i dor, Ricarqo Corte/.. 

Royal, Polk nr. California 

Shirley Mason, "Sweet Ro.sie O'Grady." 
Sat. Madge Bellamy and Edmund Lowe, 
"Lost Paradise," Sun, and Mini. 

President 

Have YOU seen "The Little Spit- 
lire" at the President Theater on Mc- 
Allister street near Market and Jones 
streets? 

If you haven't, don't miss it — and if 
your relatives come to town and want 
to laugh — take them and go several 
times, yourself. 

We have reviewed it many times in 
this column and now we add : By all 
means see the Henry Duffy comedy at 
the President. It may not be there 
much longer. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"The Red Mill," a picture heralded 
for a long time in motion picture circles 
is this week's attraction at the Warfield 
Theater with Marion Davies appearing 
in the heroine role. This picture was 
made from the famous stage hit, one of 

the Victor Herbert dramatic plays. 

Grim drama and light comedy whet 
their influences all through the stor) 
with some colorful thrills to put your 
interest mi high tension and add zest 
to the plot. Marion Davies is demure 
and sedate in this picture in which she 
wears blue petticoats, wooden shoes 
and pigtails amid scenes in the I. ami of 
the I )\ kes. 

Vaudeville headliners, \\ biting ami 
Burt, will lie part of this week's War- 
field stage presentations in addition to 
the other ideas of FancHon and Marco 
Rube Wolf and the Warfield musicians 

provide special program number-.. 

* * * 

Granada 
George Young, winner of the $25,000 

\\ riglcy prize fur swimming the lata- 
lina Channel, will appear in person at 
the Granada Theater this week, com- 
mencing Saturday . 

\ big glass tank has been built mi 
the stage and the young champion will 

demonstrate in the water, some of the 
methods which won for him fortune 
and fame, lame- O'Bryne is the Tor- 
onto boy's manager and Charles Levy 

ban. lie- certain of his business affairs. 
Mr-. Young, the hoy's mother, who 
gave him her entire savings of $135 
when he crossed the continent to* Com- 
pete in the swimming contest, first saw 
her -on here in San Francisco, after his 

victi in . 



The screen attraction at the Granada 
will be "New York," featuring Ricardo 
Cortez, Lois Wilson, Estelle Taylor, 
Norman Trevor and William Powell, 

To accommodate the crowds there 
will be five shows a day, beginning- at 
11 o'clock Saturday morning. 



St. Francis 

"The Fire Brigade" will he shown at 
the St. Francis Theater beginning Sat- 
urday, with Charles Ray and May Mc- 
Avoy the stars, supported by Tom 
< I'Brien, DeWitt Jennings and Bert 
Woodruff. William Night directed this 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer picture with 
vivid fire scenes, many of which have 
been done in color. 

Harold Lloyd's laugh-hit, "The Kid 
Brother." had a great successful run at 
the St. Francis. 



Columbia 

Have you been to the Columbia The- 
ater to see "Loose Ankles?" 

Whatever else you see in town, don't 
miss this bonis ( ). Macloon produc- 
tion. It is about the cleverest farce 
conieil_\- that has ever visited us. You'll 
think of it for days! 

"Loose Ankles," in the first place, 
abounds with Youth, of the vibrant, 
wholesome kind; sparkling dialogues, 
surprises and scintillating action. There 
is never a dull moment in the whole 
pla\ . Under the skilful stage direction 
of Lillian Albertson, it is faultless and 
fascinating. 

"1 wish that 1 could read that play 
over by myself and absorb some of the 
brilliant passage- and dialogues," said 
my companion, as we sat in the ( o- 
lumbia Theater, thoroughly relishing 
"loose Ankles." 1 have never heard a 
more continuous round of raillery. 
quick-witted repartee, or seen anything 
In equal this comedy for clean-cut hi- 
larity. 'l"he play is by Sam lanney. and 
oh. how Sammy know- the modern 
In >\ '- luie-of-talk ! 

The story concerns four voting men. 
line of mind, clean of thought. Ameri- 
can boys who. driven by lack of funds 
become professional gigolo-; or, ill 
plain vernacular, who rent themselves 
out to old ladie- wanting dancing part- 
ner-. I If course, there is a romantic 
twist to the story and that is where 
we meet Xaiicv ( arroll, who plays the 
heroine, ami her chum, played by Mar- 
jory Bennett; and her aunts. Kitty 
Moran and Katherine Claire Ward. 
William Raymond plays the role of the 
Major. 

Fmir boy- keep up the brilliancy of 
the comedy. Ken Brown and Art Miner 
being outstanding principals of rare 
characterization. Allen Connor plays 
well, the reticent hero; and Jack Car- 
rington is the other member of the 
ilo" quartette. It is Brown and 



Miner who are so genuinely human- 
boys, ami convincing, and two of tin- 
best boy-characters this critic has ever 
seen on the legitimate stage. 

But, why oh ! why, do playwrights in- 
variably depict a newspaper reporter 
as he is" N< >T? 

The Los Angeles Symphony orches- 
tra, accompanying the play, can, and 
does play good numbers, introducing 
popular melodies that we like. Then, 
on the last note of something we treas- 
ure, musically, stretch loud syncopa- 
tions to suffocate our music-loving 
ears. The violin and xylophone solos 
were well played. 

Orpheum 

Emil Boreo, formerly with Balieff's 
"Chauve-Soiiris ;" Yal and Ernie Stan- 
ton, the "English boys from America;" 
Trixie Friganza, with her newest acts, 
are headliners at the Orpheum Thea- 
ter, to begin Saturday, February 5. 

Pisano, announced as the "world's 
foremost marksman;" the Orpheum 
Circuit Dance Revue, featuring Helen 
Pachaud; Judson Cole, monologist; 
Peter Varlane giving' "Pictures in the 
Sand ;" and a number of artists appear- 
ing in a skit, in addition to "Much Ado 
About Nothing," are other Orpheum 
attraction- this coming week. 

All San Francisco especially wel- 
comes the sight of the beloved "Trixie" 
who grows more attractive with every 
appearance. 

* * * 

Gclden Gate 

The Golden Gate Theater. "The Jun- 
ior t frpheum" at the corner of Golden 
• late avenue and Taylor street, has a 
striking picture to offer this week as 
the screen feature, in addition to the 
(Continued on Page 14i 






NEW ORLEANS' 

To better serve cur many friends and 
patrons over l 400.ooo.00 has been 
expended in reconstruction to 
maintain this famous hostelry as 

One of America's Leading Hotels, 

ACCOMMODATING 1000 CHESTS 

Lar^e rooms with unusually hi$h 
ceiluUs and ^ood ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort 
Alfred S.Amer ANoCcitd. 

NBW OR1XANS.U. 

Send fcr ocscrrplhr fclfe Ticket Offices of 

Illustrated Mdrdi Gras all Transportation 

Program for the asVait 5nes in lohhv 




THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1927 






vogue for the 



Fashionables' Fad 
For Red and White 

DID you ever, in all your life, see such a 
combination of red-and-white ? 

Weddings, suppers and dinner dances among the smart 
set seem to feature the brilliant, in fact the most crimson of 
red, combined or contrasting with ivory or silvery white. 

The Weatherwax ball at Burlingame was one of the most 
picturesque and fascinating pleasures in society. In fact, it 
was gorgeous— and everything and everybody was in red, 
or in white, and many of them half-red and the rest white. 

Wasn't it a magnificent sight! 

Then, the Ehrman anniversary, too, carried out the red 
and white idea. Think of it, red for weddings ! Why. our 
grandmothers would have thought us lacking in taste, not 
to sav discretion ! 

The wedding ceremony at the new hotel in Monterey 
probably started this alluring fad for red. It was the wed- 
ding of Miss Simone Juillard and Mr. George Hotaling 
which took place on the roof of Hotel San Carlos, Monterey. 

Of course, the beautiful bride wore white satin, as is cus- 
tomary. But the bridesmaids wore bright red slippers with 
their white taffeta gowns and carried red roses in their arms 
with the indispensable lillies-of-the-valley. 

Long live the vogue, for it combines pep and poise vividly 
expressed in the colors. 

:;: # # 

Elaborate Anniversary 

One of the most elaborate events in society, recently, was 
a beautiful dinner dance given by Mr. and Mrs. S. W. 
Ehrman in honor of their wedding anniversary. The memor- 
able event took place at the Fairmont hotel, the gold ball- 
room, the red room and the Venetian dining room being 
used for the lovely affair. 

Mrs. Ehrman wore, on this occasion, a gold gown em- 
broidered with gold and jeweled ornaments; and, on her 
head, fastened to her coiffure, was the very wedding veil 
which she had worn as a bride. She entered the banquet 
room on the arm of her son, Mr. B. Charles Ehrman, to tin- 
strains of the bridal chorus, with many of her former brides- 
maids again accompanying her on the anniversary of her 
wedding day. These bridesmaids were: Mesdames David S. 
Bachman. Samuel Bissinger, Henry Ahpel, Charles Rosen- 
baum, Meyer Cohn, Albert Frank, Arthur Rosenblat, San- 
ford Goldstein, Moses Heller, Harry H. Dana, Samuel Din- 
kelspiel. Belle Heller, Samuel Schwartz, Albert Rosenbaum 
and Emil Wangenheim. 
French Colors 

The mock wedding procession proceeded to a bride's 
table, all in white, the decorations being lilies placed in bas- 
kets, with garlands of carnations extending across the table, 
ending with clusters of hyacinths. 

French period candelabra, with tall white candles, com- 
pleted the bride's table in an artistic ensemble. < )ther tables 
about the dining room, were adorned with tall red candles, 
red carnations, the fashionable red-and-white combinations 
being utilized with striking effects. 



By Antoinette Arnold 

Supper Surprises 

Supper surprises were introduced when the Fairmont 
waiters, in procession, encircled the room, bearing on a roll- 
ing stand, tall standards of ice with the significant figures 
of the wedding dates carved in ice. Graceful swans, also 
made of ice, designed and made by the Fairmont chef, were 
borne on silver platters by other waiters. Clusters of fruit 
and flowers adorned the beautiful center piece. Then, other 
waiters, followed with brown urns made of confectionery 
these, also, being filled with the season's flowers and fruits. 

Cakes, corresponding in design and color scheme, red and 
white, were served in handsome baskets made of confec- 
tionery especially for this memorable wedding anniversary. 



SANTA MARIA INN 

Santa Maria, California 

Od the Coaat HijhwiT Halfway Between Sen Franeiico and Lot Angela! 
An Inn of Uniuaal Excellence 
■ lor roamrvotioiu on your mmxt trip aectffc 



Two Hundred 

There has seldom been anything so completely beautiful, 
in every detail, as the Ehrman anniversary dinner dance, at- 
tended by two hundred couples, friends and relatives of the 
"happy pair." 



Mrs. Harris Guest 
of Honor at Clift 
Dr. Blanche Culver 



had 



a charming bridge-luncheon at 
the Clift hotel this past week in compliment to Mrs. Mar- 
shall Harris, who. in company with her husband, Dr. and 
Mrs. W. W . Wvmore, are leaving soon for a tour of the 
world. 

The luncheon was served in the roof garden room of the 
Clift hotel where a table laden with Spring blossoms seated 
the guests. Mrs. John Sylvester Pinney, Mrs. J. Emmet 
Hayden. Mrs. |e>se \\ hited, Mrs. John Gilson, Mrs, Angelo 
Rossi, Mrs. C. Milton Adams. Mrs. Thomas Alexander East, 
Mrs. Frank Smith and Mrs. George \ ranizan. 

Bridge was played in a handsome suite on the fifth floor 
where a reception was accorded the honor guest by Dr. 
Culver. 

* * * 

Mrs. Sexton Feted 

Mrs. Ella M. Sexton, well known writer, was the compli- 
mented guest at a delightful luncheon given at the Whit- 
comb hotel last week by Mrs. Aubrey (Lady Bob) Mont- 
gomery. The motif of the afternoon's entertainment was 
"Inspiration plus Imagination." Guests at the luncheon in 
Mrs. Montgomerv's beautiful suite at the Whitcomb in- 
cluded: Mrs. F. M. Nichols, Mrs. Arthur DeValle, Mrs. X. 
K. Sexton, Mrs. I. M. Wells, Mrs. Minna Day, Miss Flisa 
Meanev and Miss Genevieve DeValle. Mrs. Sexton was 
honored as the president of the Golden Gate Branch of Ten 
Women. 

They're Engaged 

Friends of Miss Mildred White were really surprised 
when she announced her engagement last week at a dinner 
dance given by her grandmother at the Hotel St. Francis. 
Mr. Hal Elliott Moore is the future husband. 



rira or torit 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

ASO Buib Street, Iletvreon Powell and Stockton, San Franolaoo 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



February 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Miss Marion Chapman of Redwood City, 
and very popular among the smart set, has just 
announced her betrothal to Mr. Howard J. 
MacDonald Jr.. of Santa Barbara. 



Two other engaged girls who were feted at 
luncheons this past week are: Miss Helen 
Wentworth, betrothed to Mr. Edward Slack; 
and Miss Dorothy Thomas, engaged to Mr. 
John Quinn. A luncheon in compliment to the 
future brides was given at Taits-at-the-Beach 
by Mrs. Alfred Brechtel and Miss Delpha 
Brechtel. 

# $ * 

Prominent Visitor 

Judge Helen Gregory MacGill of the Van- 
couver Juvenile Court and member of the Brit- 
ish Columbia Minimum Wage Board was the 
honor guest at a luncheon given last Friday at 
the Women's Athletic Club, Mrs. T. C. C. 
Gregory, hostess. California writers, women 
heading the city's activities, were among the 

guests. 

* * * 

Convention 

The quarterly convention of the City and County Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs, will be held today, Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 5, at the Fairmont hotel, Mrs. A. W. Stokes, presiding. 

It will be an all-day session. 

* * * 

At Lunch 

Mrs. A. T. Leonard was hostess at an interesting lunch- 
eon at the Hotel Mark Hopkins on Thursday, January 20. 

The guests on this occasion included Mesdames Gerald 
Campbell, Jewett W. Adams. James F. Dunne, Richard O. 
Bliss, A. E. Sbarboro, Harold Louderback, Bruce McBirney, 
Bishop, Eileen M. Leonard M. 1).. and Miss Frances Molera. 

* * * 

Hostess to Authors 

Complimenting Gertrude Atherton, California's famous 
novelist, Lannie Haynes Martin, well known writer of Los 
Angeles, entertained' at a delightful tea given in the Laurel 
Court of the Fairmont hotel, last Wednesday afternoon. 

The coterie of invited guests included main prominent 
authors of San Francisco and the bay cities. Spring flowers 
arranged in a handsome basket were the table decorations. 

with attractive place cards part of the decorative motif. 
Among those present were: 

Charmian London, widow of Jack London; Mable Mof- 
fitt, publisher of the Overland Monthl) ; B Virginia Lee, 
editor of the Overland; Mrs. Annie Franklin, Mrs. George 
H. Cabaniss, Adelaide Hillhouse Ford, Edith Bristol, drama 
editor of •'The Call;" Mrs. Harold Louderback. Miss Mar- 
joiic Da) of Pasadena and Los Angeles; Mrs. John E. Ben- 
nett, and Messrs. Chamberlain. Dixon Butler and (.'banning. 

* * * 

Shrine's "First Lady" 
Heads Reception Line 

Mrs. Julian IV Marries, the "First lady of the Shrine." 
wile of the ncwl\ elected Illustrious Potentate, Julian D. 
Harries, beaded the reception committee for the Sbriners in 
their week-end trip to Yosemite Valley. Mrs. Harries is 
one of the greatest favorites in the social life •>( Islam 1 ena- 
ble of the Shrine and is famed for her graciousness and 
charm. She led the grand march in the Shriners' winter car- 
nival ball at the Sentinel hotel. Yosemite \ alley. 

Mesdames Hugh K. McKevitt, Sarah Max Miller. Paul 
Kleiber and Glen Hoffman were prominent in assisting in 
the success f the Shriners' event staged in wonderful 
Yosemite clothed in its garments of snow and other winter 
raiment bestowed b\ Nature. 




HOTEL CANTERBUBY 
"" Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From $2.50 per day 



Midnight Supper 

Mr. and Mrs. William Rosenthal entertained 
members of the Colleagues at their home with 
a supper-party following a theater-party at the 

Alcazar to see "The Home Towners." 

* * * 

Miss Elizabeth Myrick gave a bridge-lunch- 
eon at the Fairmont hotel last week, compli- 
menting Mrs. George Warren Vilas, who, with 
Mr. Vilas, has just returned from a four years' 
sojourn in the Orient. 

* * * 

Fashionable Weddings. 

One of the most fashionable of society's 
lovely weddings this past month took place at 
the home of the bride's mother when Miss 
Kathryn Chase became the bride of Mr. David 
Conrad. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. 
Clara Underbill Chace and sister of Mr. Henry 
Underbill Chace. The bridegroom is the si in 
of Mrs. David A. Conrad of Santa Barbara. 



Miss Dorothy Doyle, daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Guy Doyle, Berkeley, was married to Mr. 
Paul Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. 
Thomas of Berkeley, at the home of the bride's parents on 

Thursday, January 20. 

* * * 

Brides-to-be 

Miss Alberta Jannopoulos has announced her engagement 
to Ensign Leonidas Metellus Matthews, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. M. Matthews of North Carolina. The bride-to-be is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Jannopoulos, and her sister 
is Miss Babette Jannopoulos. 

* * * 

Monsalves Entertain 

An evening of music with a group of prominent San Fran- 
cisco artists was given January 25, by Senor Don Carlos J. 
Monsalve. vice consul of Peru, and his wife. Countess Flor- 
enza as host and hostess, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Blanckenburg, in Jackson street. 

Over one hundred guests were assembled on this occa- 
sion, enjoying a program of exceptional merit by well known 
musicians. 

The Silver String Serenaders. under the direction of 
Gregory Golubeff, played operatic and other selections, 
with solos by Mr. Golubeff including his own composition 
as a serenade to the honored Countess Florenza. A beautiful 
tribute was given the Countess by their president. Mrs. 
Nellie Kuykendall. < >ther members of the orchestra are: 
Agnes Mehlert, Louise ECuenzi, Mrs. Sherick, Mrs. Charles 
Ker. Mrs. Edward Schmidt. Mrs. Doane and Mrs. Joseph 
Cote. 

( ithers were Florence and Agnes McLachren. Miss Nan 
Could. California Trio. Alice Guthrie Poyner. Dr. Claude 
Warford, Mrs. A. J. Silva. Mr. Prosper Keitcr. Mrs. E. 
Blanckenburg and Sirs. Prosper Reiter. 

Ferns, hyacinths and jonquills added to the beauty of the 
spacious rooms. A sumptuous supper concluded the evening. 

* * * 

Formal Ball 

The formal anniversary ball of Salesian Council. Y. M. I., 
held in the Fairmont hotel recently was a beautiful affair. 

Handsome Gowns 

The ladies present were handsomely gowned. Among 
them were Mrs. R. Olivi in a brocaded flame velvet gown 
trimmed with blue and amber beads. Mrs. W. Fennone 
wore a beaded apricot georgette. 

Mrs. Samuel Fugazi wore a black velvet dress. Mrs. Leo 
Fallon wore a canary yellow georgette beaded and hand 
painted in colors. 

(Continued on Page 18) 






10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 





C. J. Pennington 

Tubes 

WITH the advent of the new detector 
tube type CX-300A or its equiva- 
lent, and the successful development of 
the power tube, one manufacturer now 
lias fifteen distinct types of radio tubes 
on the market. 

Radio tubes today may be divided into 
four general classifications: detector, 
voltage amplifier, power amplifier and 
rectifier tubes. Within these classes 
some tubes are constructed to serve stor- 
age battery operated sets, others to be 
used in dry cell operated receivers and 
still others for use in connection with 
socket power devices, including elimina- 
tors. 

Type CX-300A is a new special tube 
designed for use only in the detector 
socket of receivers using live volt tubes. 
'1 Ins new detector will give a receiver 
clearer and sweeter tone and increase 
volume on far-away stations. Installation 
is merely a matter of taking out the oil 
tube and slipping the new tube in its 
place. 

Type CX-301A is a general purpose 
tube for storage battery sets and one of 
the most popular tubes in use today. It 
gives amplification at either audio or 
radio frequency. 

„ Type CX-1 12 may be used in place of 
CX-301A in the last audio stage with an 
increase of plate voltage on the CX-1 12 
tube only. CX-1 12 is a power tube and 
feeding the loud-speaker, improves tone 
quality and gives increased volume. 
CX-371 is a power amplifier tube de- 
signed for the last audio stage. Either 
of these two tubes improves the opera- 
tion of any loud-speaker. 

Then conies the dry cell tubes, the 
C-299 and CX-299 arc' general purpose 
high vacuum tubes especially designed 
for extreme economy of operation from 



dry cells. The tubes are identical except 
for their bases. C-299 has a special type, 
small bayonet lock base, while the CX- 
299 is mounted on the standard CX base. 
1'he former type is .manufactured princi- 
pally for replacement purposes, since 
new sets are designed for the standard 
push type base. CX-220 is a high vacuum 
tube designed for dry battery operation 
as a power amplifier to supplement C 
and CX-299. It is used only in the last 
audio stage to feed the loud-speaker with 
maximum undistorted power. 

Types C-ll and CX-12, like C-299 
and CX-299, are the same except for 
their bases. 

CX-313 is a full wave rectifier tube 
and CX-316B is a single wave rectifier of 
high power. These tubes are for use with 
socket power devices, including "II" 
eliminators. CX-374 and CXl-376 are 
also tubes for special work in connection 
with operating receivers directly from 
the house lighting circuits. 

CX-310 is a heavy duty power ampli- 
fier tube, designed especially to operate 
heavy duty loud-speakers. C-377' is a 
protective tube which, when connected 
in the "I!" battery circuit, will protect 
radio tube filaments against any possi- 
bility of accidental burn-out. through 
wrong "B" battery connection or short 
circuits. 

There are more tube manufacturers 
this year than heretofore, and in most 
cases the manufacturer has a tube equiva- 
lent with the numbers mentioned in this 
article. The difference in the tubes in 
several cases is only in the letter prefix. 
as the numbers remain the same, for ex- 
ample, in the CX-1 12 and a CX-1 12. 
I loth are power lubes. Another designer 
designates his tubes with the "DV" and 
Id." prefixes, with the tubes designed t<> 
function in various sockets, just as the 
1 X or L'X line. 

* * * 

An increase in the capital stock of The 
Van Home Company, Franklin, Ohio, 
has been announced. 

This announcement followed the re- 
turn of S. Van Home, president of the 
company, to the factory after an exten- 
sive eastern trip. 

It is understood that contracts with 
two or three leading set manufacturers 
call for the delivery of production quali- 
ties of a new \ an I lorne tube which is 
to he used in a new circuit as vet unan- 
nounced. The demand For this' tube and 
another special Van I lorne tube will 
make all-summer production necessary, 



Radio Program 

for Next Week 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 
Sunday. February u 

y:45 to 10:45 a. in. — Undenominational and 
nun-sectarian church service. 

10:45 a. ni. — Weather forecast. 

2:10 to 4:15 p. in. — Concert of the San Fran- 
cisco .Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 

o i Alfred Hertz, broadcast by kpo, 

KOi) and KFI. 

G:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

6:30 p. m. — General information. 

8:35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

8:86 to 10:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Monday, February 7 

11:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Tall;. 

I- >oon — Tim,- signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 lo 2:lill p. m. — FairliH.nl Mule] t'oneeri 

prchesl ra. 

-Palace Hotel Concert Or- 



— Children's hour. 

-Stock market quotations. 

-States Restaurant Orches- 

. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 



3:3U l.. 5:30 p. 

chestra. 
5:30 to 6:15 p. 
0:15 i" 6:30 p. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. 

tra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. 

Orchestra, 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

00 to >. : 1 o p. ill. — Chamber of Commerce talk. 
8:10 i" 8:25 p. m. — Book reviews. 
8:25 i" 9:00 p. m, — Bridge lesson No. 16 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 
neiiii lo li:(in p. m.— Billy Long's Cabirlans. 
11 i" 12:00 p. in. — KPO Variety Hour, 

Tuenday, February 8 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

Heir, a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

-Palace Hotel Concert Or- 



-Chlldren's Hour. 

-Stock market quotations. 

-States Restaurant Orches- 



8:30 Lo 5:30 p 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

■vii" to :i mi p. in— "iMa Waldrop Hour." 

foil" in I":"" ii. m.— studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:110 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californlans. 

Wednesday, February It 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises, 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 n. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 lo 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6 ■:•» p. m. — stock ma-ket quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:0" lo 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 lo S:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Atwater Kent Artists. 

in 1 p. in. — Studio program, 

in:"" to 11:00 p. m. — stales ttestaurant Or- 
chestra. 

11:11" o, 12:0" p. m.— Billy Long's Cablrians. 

ThurHdUy, February 10 

6:46, 7:1.',. 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m, — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a. ni. — Cooking hints ami recipes 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchest ■ i 

3:30 to 5:3o p. m.— Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 



February 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



6:3 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 ; l 5 tn 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

7:30 to S:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

i to 11:00 p. m. — ralace Hotel Dance Or- 

chestra. 

llim to 12:00 P. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Friday, February 11 

8:46, 7:1-^, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast.. 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion Talk. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

12:45 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — "Sports on the air." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. ra. — Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 

10:0u to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Saturday, February III 

6:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 lo 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 t" 0:00 p. m. — Simultaneous broadcast 
by KPO and KFI. 

B:00 in 10:00 p. m, — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

10:00 to 1:00 a. m. — Waller Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 



KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 

Dally Except Sunday 

9:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 
2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Vocal and Instrumental 

Selections. 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sunday, February <• 

2:30 to 3:00 p. in. — Sunday school. 
3:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Temple service. 
S:iiii !<> 10:00 P. m. — Evening service. 
Momluy, February 7 

12:30 t" i M'li p. Hi. — Daily Scripture reading 
Tui"s<i;i>, Febrnurj 8 

12:80 i" 1:0" p. m.— Dally Script ure reading. 
s:un tn 10:00 p. m.- Studio program, 

IVciltiCNilay, February 11 

12:80 i" 1:00 p. m. — Dally Scripture reading 
|;3o '" i mi p. m i '1 \ Ine healing sej \ Ice. 
8:00 (" 10:00 i>. m.— studio program. 
Thursiin.* . February 10 
12:30 to 1:00 p. in. — Daily Scripture reading 

Friday. February II 

12:30 to 1:00 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading. 
|:00 i" 10:00 p. m. — Studio program 
8:00 i" 4:00 p, m. — Sunshine hour 

Saturday, February 111 

i IQ to 1 00 p. m. — Daily Scrlptui 



KYA— PACIFIC BROADCOASTING CORP. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 399.8 

Sunday. February it 

1 1 tin a, in. — Ser\ Ices of the Central Methodist 

i !pl scopa i Church, 
; ■;::.! n m — Si i i ices oi ihe Central Methodist 

Episcopal Church. 
Monday. Fehrunrj 7 

i ■■ ■ i m t Hotel i 'oncert Trio. 

B I : 30 |) m. — Clift Hotel Com ■ i 

' 00 ti p, m -Popular Nfghl In the 

Studio 

1 tu I 1 00 p. in Cllft Hotel Datu 

chest ra 
TufMdny, Frbruarj S 
I 2:30 lo 2 1)0 it i Hotel Coi 

Cllft Hotel Concert Trio. 
-Silent for DX Fans. 

1 00 m— Clift Hotel I >anc« i H - 

stra. 



Wednenday, February ft 

18:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Cllft Hotel Concert Trie 

5:30 to 7:30 p. m. -Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Tn the studio 

3:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The Emydian Choir. This 
hour wil be devoted fcb college veils and 

A Ima Mater songs 

10: o 1] > mi-— Clift Hntel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Thursday, February 10 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Cllft Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30. to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Silent for DX Fans. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Friday, February 11 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio Program. Contralto 
solos, violin solos, soprano solos, tenor 
solos. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

Saturday, February 12 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

0:3ii to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Silent for DX Fans. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 



KFWI- 



■RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, 
SAN FRANCISCO— 250 



INC., 



Sunday. February it 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Community Chest of San 
. Francisco' classic program. 
7:50 to 9:00 p. m. — Services broadcast from 

Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 
Monday, February 7 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Dance program. Paul 

Kelli's Orchestra. 
Tuesday, February S 
6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 
8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Lecture. Gaylord Wilshire. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m, — studio program. 
Wednesday, February ft 
8:00 to 8:20 p. m. — Studio prog-ram. 
8:20 to 8:30 p. m. — Becker Storage program. 
8:30 to 11:30 p. m. — I >ance program. Paul 

Kell i'a Orchestra. 

Thursday. February I ft 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — -Studio program. 

8:00 to 9:30 p. m, — Studio program. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Panatrope concent, 

l it: mi to 1 2:i)ii p. m. — Dane- program. Paul 

K el I L's ' trcheet ra. 
Friday, February 1 1 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m, — Studio program. 

8 mi i" 8:30 p. in. -Studio program. 

8:30 (.. 9:00 p. m. — Lecture, Gaylord Wilshire 

9 10:00 p. m. — St u din program. 

Saturday February 12 

: I to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. Paul 

Kelli's ( irchesl ra. 



KGO- 



-GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 



Sunday, February *'> 

ii 00 ;i. m.— Firsl Congregational Church 
service. 

2 in p, m. — San Fra nciscp Symphony < fenes- 
tra concert, direction of Alfred Hertz. 

i 00 p. m. — Vesper service, Grace Cathedral. 

6 tO to 7:30 p, m.— Bern's Symphony Orches- 
1 1 .i 

7:30 p. m. — Weather bureau ri 

- m — First Congregational Church serv- 
i >a i% land. 
'.« no to 10:00 p. m. — Bent's Symphony Orches- 

t ra. 
Moaday, February 7 
11 :30 to 1:00 p m Hotel 1 >ea mlngton. 
p, m. — W< al her Bureau report 

i m.— N. V SI "Ok reports. 

.. m. — ■ s. K. Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau report 
i 00 to 5:00 p. m. — Callfori I ttlon of 

Women's Clubs. 

p. in — KGO Kiddles' Klub. 
p. m — Bern's Little Symphony. 
p, m. — News items. 
!v in, — Weather Bureau report. 

ce, G rain, Col ton. and 
Metals. 

7 1 4 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
: ji ,, m . — S. F. Stock reports (cloa 

hmnlax, l'«linmr> M 

a m to i no |i m. — Hotel learning ton 
■ 1 1 
no. mk — Tiuw signal. 

©..—Weather Bureau report 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

(Continued on Page 12) 



HOTEL 




'ancing 



On Top o the World 
with 

£ddi E Hakkne ss 

and his orchestra 

Dinner Dance d> Supper Dance 
Nightly-Mr^/ Sunday. Tea every 
afternoon— except Sunday— four 
'til six. // Special Dollar Tea 
Dansant Monday and Saturday 
Afternoons. 

HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

California at Mason 

■T>mtnport 6300 



Jollow the 

Qolden c R^ad 

to Health] 

Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 6:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1927 



Radio Program for Next Week 



1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddie Klub. 

ij:uo to (j:do p. m. — Bern's .Little symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

T:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:u6 p. m. — S. Jtf\ Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing*. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 

Pilgrims." 
9:00 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 
9:20 p. m. — Surprise broadcast. 

Wednesday, February I> 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Hotel Leamington. 

12:00 noon. — Time signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

3:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:4 2 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

5:30 p. m. — '"For instance," by General Jack- 
son. 

6:uo to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

t>:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — ,S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:11 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closingj. 

8:00 p. m. — (S. F. Studio) Farm Program 

8:10 p. m. — (Series) "The Cattle Trail.'" 

8:20 p. m. — An interview with the Agricul- 
tural Economist. 

8:30 p. m. — W. O.W.Male Trio. 

8:40 p. m. — Address. "For the Protection of 
Fruits Against Insects." 

9:00 p. m. — W. O. "W. Male Trio. 

9:15 p. m. — Alameda Music Teachers' Asso- 
ciation. 

Thursday, February 10 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Concert. 

12:00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — George "W. Ludlow, "Friend 
to Boys." 

6:00 to t> : 55 p. m. — Bern's Little .Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Metals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:15 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) — Pro- 
gram by Arion Trio. 

9:15 to 12:00 p. m. — John Philpot's Midship- 
men. 

Friday. February II 

11:30 to 1:00 a. m. — Concert. 

12:00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7.06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing i. 
8:00 p. m. — Studio Program. 

Saturday, February 12 

11:30 to 1:00 p. m. — Concert. 

12:00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p. m. — U. S. Weather Bureau report. 

8:00 p. m. — "Weekly Sport Review," by Al 

Santoro. 
9:15 p, m. to 1:00 a. m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's 

Band dance music. 



KLX- 



■OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 



Mtiudny, February 7 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News Broadcast. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting Lake 
Merritt Ducks. 

Tuesday, February S 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday, February it 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Special program. 

Thursday. February 10 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Friday, February 1 1 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio program. Valentine 
party for the children, broadcast by the 
Tribune K iddies. 

9:00 in 10:30 p. m. — Athens Athletic Club Or- 
chestra, 

Saturday. February 13 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 

Sunday. February 

b.w a. m. — international Sunday School Les- 
son. 

11:00 to 12:00 noon — Church services. 

7:45 to 9:00 p. m. — Fvening services. 

Monday* February 7 

10:U0 a. m. — The nour of Christian Ministry. 

Tuesday, February S 

l:iin to 5:00 ]). m, — Sacred Variety program. 

Wednesday, February » 

10:uu a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

8:00 p. m. — .Saci ed songs. 

Friday, February II 

10:uu a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:00 to 3:00 i>. m.— \v an's Place in the 

Economy of God. 

S:00 p. m. — Telepnone or write in your health 
Questions and they will bu informally dis- 
cussed, 

Saturday, February IS 

1:30 to 2:30 p. m. — Cnildren's Church Broad- 
cast. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
Forecast: ( b > Announcements of Churches 
for Sunday. 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 

Sunday, February «i 

9:45 to 10:45 ;i. m. — Prof. E, C. Linsley's Bible 

class. 
11:00 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
7:45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
Monday February 7 

b:ib lu y:lb a. n». — The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to b:0U p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 t" 10:00 p. m.— Music from tin.' Romantic 

No) Hi. 
Tuesday, February 8 

SR45 to 9:15 a. in. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
9:45 to 10:00 a. m.— "Iiiet and Health." 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
'6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 

Stamp Collectors. 
8:15 to 10:00 p. m.— The KTAB Quartet. 
9:00 p. m. — Talk by Fred T. Hunter. 
"Wednesday, February U 

8:45 to if.iii a. in. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
8:00 i" 10:00 p. m, — Featuring bird musk'. 
Thursday, February 10 

fc>:45 tn ;i;15 a. m. — "ine Hour of Prayei 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's Hour. 
0:30 to 7:00 p. in. — Twilight Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
Friday, February 11 

N:45 lu 9:15 a. in. — The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
6:00 to 6:20 p. m. — Twenty minutes with Dr. 

Thompson. 

m. — Shopping Hour. 

m. — Featuring time, I ; a's 



7:00 to 7:30 

8:00 to ! p 

songs, 
9:00 to 10:00 p 



-Goat Island Goats. 
Saturday. February I - 

8:46 i ■ .• 1 ."i a. m. — "i'he Hour of Prayer." 
9:1."! to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
7:00 to 7:30 n. m. — Shopping Hour. 

KRE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 

Sunday! February a 

10:00 to 11:00 a. m. — Church Service. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m, — Dinner Concert. 

8:15 to 9:00 p. m. — Social concert. 

Monday, February 7 

11:1.' a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — Current news. 

8:00 (o 10:00 p. m — Studio program. 

Tuesday, February H 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

r > :30 j>. m. — Current news. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

WedneHday, February ft 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 i> m. — Current news. 

Thursday, February 10 

11:15 a. in.— Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. rn.— -( 'nrrent news. 

S:00 to loon p. rn. — Studio program. 

Fiida? . Febi nary 1 1 

11:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 

5:30 p. m. — ''nrrent news. 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance program. 



Saturday, February 12 

11:15 a. in. — Fnyaiuai exercises for women. 
5:30 p. m. — Current news. 
K:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Dance program. 
KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 
(Copyright 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc.) 

Sunday, February (E 

1 o an a. m. — Morning services, under direc- 
tion of Los Angeles Church Federation. 

11:00 a. m.— Monthly services, from the Third 
Church of Christ. Scientist. 

2:45 p. m. — Standard Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia presents San Francisco .Symphony 
Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, Conductor; broad- 
cast simultaneously by KFI, KPO, KGO. 

6:00 p. m. — Weekly program of classical and 
semi-classical music by Russian Academy 
of Musical Art, Boris Myronoff. 

7:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Kecital; Alex 
Reilly at the console. 

8:00 p. m. — Packard Classic Hour. Sylvia 
Zei Lien Rosenthal, concert pianist. 

9:00 p. m. — tjob Bu tiger and his Venetians 
Dance Orchestra. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Six Orchestra — Bill 
1 1 en nessey, Dlrecl or. 

Monday, February 7 

lorio to 10:40 a. m. — Furnishings for the 
home talk, by Amies wind-. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold 
Medal Flour Home Service Tall:?. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnes 
White. 

5 30 p. m. — Virgil Ray's Winter Garden Or- 
chestra, 

6:16 p. in. — Radiotorial. 

6:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket Period, presenting 
Genevieve Blaisdell, soprano. 

7:00 p. hi. — Owen Fallon and his Callforniana] 

s.nn p. in — ('lassie sonu recital by Robert 

] I ii rd, concert Lu. ir. 

9:00 p. m.— Ruth Palethorpe, soprano, ami 
Lewis A. Kerwin, c :ei i pianist. 

i 0:00 p. m. — Weekly program, presenting 
vaudeville artists by Melklejohn Bros. 

Tuesday, February h 

5:30 p. m, — The Dragon rlawailans. 

i; : 1 r. p. in.— m usie Appreciation Chat 

Father Ricard's Sun Spot Weather F 

cast. 
6:30 p. in. — Vest Pocket Period. 
7:00 p. m. — Paul Howard's Quality Seren- 

aders. 
8:00 p. in. — classical program by the Gattone 

String Quartet, with Gretchen Garrett. 

prano, 

9:00 p. tn, — Pro-ram by I lean Metcalf, pianist, 
in popular ballads. 

lo:on p. in. — Azure Music Club, Glen Edmunds 
ami his Collegians. Dance Orchestra. 

Wednesday, February 11 

10:20 to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on Child Training] 
by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker, Gold] 
Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnesi 
White. 

5:30 p. m— .luck Murray's Italian Village Or- 
chestra. 

hi." p. nV — Radiotorial. 

* 30 p. m. — Blaine Ruth, contralto. 

7:00 p. m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians. 

7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris. Detective Stories; 

7:45 p. m.— Eugenia Whlsenant, blues singer. 

s.:ini p. ni. — Pryor Moore, director of the Cal^ 
pet Orchestra, with soloists, presented by 
tin- i 'a ii torn in Petroleum < lorporation. 

9:00 p. m. — Leslie Adams in a popular pro- 
gram. 

10:00 p. in. — Program by the Sunset Instru- 
mental Quartet in a concert piogram. with 
j lorothy Ruth Miller. 



ind 




February 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



rhursilay, February 10 

v;;n p. m. — Sebastians Cotton Club Orchestra. 
; 1 5 p, m. — Radiotorial. 

6:3n p. m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orches- 
tra. 

7:00 p. m. — Program by University of South- 
ern California. 

s:imi p. m. — KFI Drama Hour, presenting a 
inn -act play. 
30 p. m. — Kitty Short, soprano. 

9;00 p. m, — Varied program of semi-classical 
ballade. 

10:OU p. m. — Johnston & Farrell's Music Box 
Hour, direction of Gene Johnston. 

Friday. February 11 

L0:au to 10:40 a. m. — Talk on home manage- 
ment by Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m. — Betty Crocker. Gold 
Medal Home Service Talks. 

11:10 to 11:30 — Food Talks by Agnes "White. 

5:80 p. m. — Program by Eugene Biscailuz, 
King Collins, baritone. 

6:15 p. m. — KFI Radiotorial Period. 

6:30 p. m. — Baron Keyes, the Radio Rambler. 

?,:00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts and 
Leslie Adams, whistler. 

8:00 p. m. — Aeolian Organ Recital — Alex Reil- 
ly at the console. 

9:00 p. m. — Alma Frances Gordon, contralto. 

Ki:iiii p. m. — Packard Ballad Hour. 

Saturday, February 3 3 

5:30 p. m. — Matinee program. 

6:15 p. m.— Madame Nelson, psychologist. 

6:30 p. m. — Billy Cox and his dance orchestra, 
with soloists. 

8:00 p. m. — Mission Bell Orchestra, Pry or 
Moore, director. Concert program, present- 
ed by the Los Angeles Soap Company. 
Broadcast simultaneously by KFI and KPO, 

!):iin p. m. — Program of semi-classical music 
by the California Federation of Music 
Clubs. 

10:00 p. m. — Packard Radio Club — Esther 
Walker, pianist, and Red Wyatt and his 
Ukt\ 

linn p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

Daily Except Sunday 

8:00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning 
prayer. 

8:55 a. m. — Time Signals. 

9:00 a. m. — .Shopping News. 

10::;t> a. m. — Household Economics. 

12:00 m. — George Redman's Orchestra. 

l:::n p. m. — The Book Worm. 

4:i)(i p, m. — Lost and Found column. 

4:65 p. m. — Market reports. 

5:45 p. m. — The Town Tattler. 

6:0U p. in. — George Redman's Orchest ra. 

6:::o p. in. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

Sunday. February <S 

10:00 a. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

2:00 to 4:00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4:0u p. in. — Roberts Golden Stan- Hand. 

1:16 p. m. — Wilshire All-Souls Church, 

6:;pi ]). m. — Hollywood Unitarian Church. 

7:00 p. m. — 1st Presbyterian Church uf Holly- 
wood. 

1:00 p. m, — Concert " )rchestra. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

M an day, February 7 

3:00 p. m. — First Presbyterian Church ol Hol- 
lywood. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:30 p. m. — Pia> let. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:n<) p. m.— Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m. — KNX Feature program. 

1 1 ;imi p. m. — Uus a rn in- 1 m's Orchestra. 

TueKdny. Febrtmr> N 

3:00 p. m. — Combined program by Police and 

Fire Depts. 
1:00 ii. 'ii. Radio matinee. 
7: imi p. m. — Courtesy program. 
LOQ i'. m, — Feature program. 
9 no p. in.- Courtesy program, 
t o .on p. m. — Gus A rn helm's Orchestra. 

■\\ 'edit end ay, February !> 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

k30 p, m. — Feature program. 

|:00 p, io. — » lourtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:iin p. m.— Feal ui e pi ogram. 

ii oo p, in. — tins Arnheim's i irchi 

ChurMdny, February 10 

11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 

7 no p. in. — Organ recital by Fred Scholl. 

B 00 p, ni. — Court* 53 pi ogram. 

|:00 to in 00 p, m.— Fea ! ur \ pi i -ram, 

10:00 p. ni. — Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Fi ni:i > . February 1 1 

m.< — -Musical program. 
4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts" Musical Program. 
7 :0Q p. in i '< 
s oo p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 



and 



10:00 p. m. — ■ Feature program. 

11:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Saturday, February III 

3:00 p. m. — The Town Crier of the Day, 
his pals. 

7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 

7:15 p. m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 
vices of the leading: Los Angeles churches. 

7:3<i p. m. — Feature program. 

S:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

11:00 p. m. — KNX Frolic from the main studio. 
KFVVB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Sunday, Fein nary 7 

S:S0 tit 9:00 p. m.- — Studio program. 

9:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 

Monday, February 7 

12:30 t<> 1:30 p. m. — classified hour. 

5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. —Dinner hour concert. 

7:00 to S:00 p. m.— Program featuring concert 
orchestra. 

8:00 to 8:10 p. m. — Daily News items. 

8:10 to 0:0n p. m. — Kenneth Gillum, popular 
sungs. 

9:00 to 9:50 p. m. — European Novelty Orches- 
tra. 

9:50 to 10:00 p. m. — Daily News items. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Orchestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Tuesday, February 8 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Classified hour. 

4:45 to 5:no p. m. — Dr. L. T. Clark on "Diet." 

5 o 0:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 t<> 7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7 :no to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

7::i0 to 7:50 p.m.- — Interesting announcements. 

7:50 to 8:00 p. m. — Dailv News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

9:00 to 9:50 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

9:50 to 10:00 p. m. — Daily News items. 

K):iiii tn lDOii p. m. — Orchestra. 

11:00 tn 1^:00 p. m. — Dance music, 

Wednesday, February 1) 

12:30 in 1:30 p. m. — Classified hour. 

5:00 t<> 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6:00 io 7:ii0 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

Tim to 7:30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sun- 

sh ine. 
7:30 to 7:60 p. m. — Interesting announcements. 
f:60 to 8:00 p. m. — Daily News items. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m, — Warner Bros. Orchestra, 
9:00 lo 9:50 p. m. — The Junior Symphony. 
9:50 to 10:00 p. m. — Daily News items. 

I 0:00 toll :i)n p. m. — Orchestra. 

11:00 i" 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Tiiursdny. February lu 

12:30 lo 1:30 p. m. — Classified hour. 

6:00 io 7:00 p. m, — Dinner hour concert. 

7:ito to 7:80 p. m. — Program. 

7:30 to 7:60 p. m. — Interesting announcements. 

7:fi(i to 8:00 p. ni- — Daily News items. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Hawaiian Quartette. 

9:00 io 9:50 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

9:60 to 10:00 p. m. — Daily News items. 

10:00 i" 11:00 p. m.— Orchestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Friday, February ll 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m.— Classified hour. 

6:00 io 7:00 p. m, — Dinner hour concert. 

i do i" i : " i' in interesting announcements. 

; 30 to 8 .mi p. in. — < !oncer1 i trchesl ra. 

8:00 to 9:00 i'. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

9:00 I- 9 50 p m Warner Bros. String Trio. 

9:50 to i v in. — i '■' ily N< « a items. 

I to 11 I'" p. in. — Orchesl ra, 

II o 1 .' 00 p. m. — 1 >a nee inn.- ir. 

Saturday, February 13 

i ■ ' i SO p. m. — Classified hour. 

7:00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 
i ii. i to 8:00 P mi. -Mi lody Makers, 

8:00 to 9 i' in - Progi i ; " 

w.i rner Bi os, String Trio. 
l 0:00 to i i :00 p, m. — ■ >rchesl 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m, — I'ance music. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN. PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 

* li ml ii v. February 8 

10:56 to l-':::' 1 p. ra. — Morning services. 
1:00 to 6:00 p. m.— KGW Salon Orchestra. 

i p in — i :onc0r1 i irchestra. 
7:80 to 9:00 p. m.— Evening services. 

.• 10:00 p. ra, — Cot 
Monday, February " 
- IS a m. — Setting up exercises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a m. — Music, weather report, 
hold helps, 
i l :30 p. ni Moon c< 

. r on cert, 
p. in. — Children's Program. 
7 i:. p. m. — Utility service. 

Udeville entertainment, 
nice music, 
Tueaaay, I Vliruar? * . 

., , ;, m. — -Women s Health Exer- 

M tslc, weather report, 
helps. 

i p. m. — Noon coi 
p. m. — Women's Matinee. 



6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 

Wednesday* February ft 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
0:00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert, 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Utility service. 
7:30 to S:00 p. m. — Albers Poultry School. 
S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 
Thursday, February 10 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility Service. 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 
S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
Friday, February 11 
7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 
9 :45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health exer- 
cises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:150 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting of 

KGW Movie Club. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weekly frolic of 

Keep Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, February 12 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m. — Weather report. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



the 



the 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. February C 

L0:30 a. m. — Solemn High Mass. 

6:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

7 1". a. m.— Sermon, Rev. Thomas Burke. 

Mmiilny, February 7 

11:45 a. m. — Weather, stocks, markets. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

0:30 p. in. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 p. m. — Children's hour. 

S:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

sir. p. m.— Studio program. 

Tuesday. February S 

11:46 a. m, — Weather, stocks, markets. 

12:16 p. m. — Organ Recital. 

3:16 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. in. — Housewives' matinee. 

4;;!ii p. m. — Question Box. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

t 30 i> m— Farm Questions. 
9:00 p. m. — Instruction in Auction Bridge. 
\\ edaesday, February ft 
ill.- :1 in — Weather, stocks, markets. 
12:16 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
$:00 p m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 
, m . — Talk. 

6:30 p m. — Dinner concert. 

7:30 p. m. — Wynken, Blynken and Nod. 

8:00 p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Thamdar< February l» 

ii i;, ,, m,— Weather, stocks, markets. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:16 p. ra. — Talk. 

3:80 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock. 

Friday. February 11 

11:45 a, m. — Weather, stocks, markets, 

m. — Instrumental Concert. 
1:00 p. m. — Organ Recital. 
I i -, p m .__ Talk. 
3:80 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

■■. m. — Question Box. 
4:45 p. m. — Fashion Review. 
6:00 p. m. — Stocks, markets, livestock, 
m. — I 'inner concert. 

a . Backoffs." 
7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 

school lesson. 
800 p. m. — Instrumental program. 
B:16 p. m. — Studio program. 
Saturday, February l- 
11:45 a . m. — Weather, si 
12:15 p. ra. — Organ Recital. 
10:30 p. m. — Dance program. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Pleasure's Wand 



February 5, 19271 



five vaudeville acts of importance on 
their "Innovation "Week" program. 

"Young April," a Cecil B. DeMille 
picture, stars Joseph Schildkraut, Bes- 
sie Love and Bryant Washburn. The 
hero, a prince, gets into many entan- 
glements, including his romantic ad- 
ven.ures with a Grand Duchess, who 
turns out to be — . But see the show and 
find that out! 

Herman Timberg headlines the bill 
a^ the chief fun-maker, bringing an act, 
"The Novelty Shop." Rosita, appear- 
ing in "The Darling of Spain," in a 
gorgeous Hispano Revue, has two as- 
sistants, Paco Moreno and Pilarica. 
Sammy Timberg, Herman's yi mng 
brother, appears in "The Rebellion," a 
satire on syncopation. "A Night in a 
Night Club," features Alice Ridnor and 
Barbara Blair. 

* * * 

California 

Ben Burbridge. the mighty hunter, in 
his famous "Gorilla Hunt," and "That 
Model From Paris," as the screen 
photoplay, are this coming week's at- 
tractions at the California Theater. 

Lions, tigers, elephants and other 
gigantic beasts are' captured amid great 
dangers and during the procedure, mo- 
tion pictures were taken, presenting 
some of the most exciting African jun- 
gle expeditions. 

Bert Lytell, Marceline Day and 
Eileen Percy are the stars in ""That 
Model From Paris." directed by Louis 
J. Gasnier, using the Gouverneur Mor- 
ris story, "The Right to Live." A large 
supporting cast is given in the picture 
with comedy-drama slants on life. 

Attilio Laraia and the big California 
orchestra will be heard in concert num- 
bers and there are always at the Cali- 
fornia Theater, the latest news reels 
and educational films and comic sup- 
plements. 

* * * 

Pantages 

"Cissie" Loftus heads the new bill at 
Pantages Theater this coming week- 
starting with Saturday's performances' 
Many characteristic imitations will be 
given by beloved Cecilia Loftus, who 
seems to take on the very personalities 
of those win ini she imitates to perfec- 
tion. 

_ Francis Renault, the "slave of fash- 
ion." has brought a wardrobe worth 
$j0,000, so we are told, in which he 
demonstrates some of the things that 
milady may wear. Renault imperson- 
ates Queen Marie in these new per- 
formances, as well as other world-fam- 
ous folks. 

"Stage Madness" is the screen feat- 
ure, with lovely Virginia Valli the star. 
There are other good numbers to ex- 
pect on the Pantages bill. 



(Continued from Page 7) 

Cameo 

Harry Carey in "Satan Town" ("Tia- 
juana has nothing on this hell-hole" 
savs the caption used in the announce- 
ment), comes to the Cameo Theater, 
Saturday, fur a run of four days. The 
Cameo will also show colored scenes 
of Yosemite Valley. 

Alice Joyce and \\". C. Fields, co-star- 
ring in "Su's Your Old Man," will be 
screened from Wednesday to Saturday. 
In conjunction with this program will 
also be a Mack Sennett comedy, 
"Masked Mammas." 

* * 

Alhambra 

"Taxi-Taxi," with Edward Everett 
Horton and Marian Nixon the princi- 
pals, is the screen feature today, Sat- 
urday and Sunday, at the beautiful new 
Alhambra Theater on Polk street, near 
Green. Richard Dix will be seen in 
"The Quarterback," with Esther Rals- 
ton playing the heroine, for Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday's showings. 
All the excitement, glamor and color 
that provides college life with its zest 
are shown with some 70,000 people in 
the background. This is a Paramount 
picture. 

"The Eagle of the Sea" comes to the 
screen Thursday, for a run of two days, 
with Ricardo Cortez and Florence 
Vidor the stars. This picture is in- 
tensely exciting. The O'Neill Sisters' 
Kiddies appear every Friday evening. 

* *~ * 

Theater Arts Club 

A group (jf four one-act plays was 
presented with credit to all concerned 
Thursday evening, January 27, in the 
playhouse of the Woman's City Club, 
465 Post street, Talma-Zetta Wilbur, 
director. 

W. S. Lord played the role of father 
in "The Terrible Woman," a comedy 
by Wilbur Daniel Steele. Dian D'Au- 
ber, Evelyn Hines ami Master Edward 
Unger were other players. 

"The Buffer;" "Smarty's Party," and 
"The Robbery," a comedy, were the 
other three playettes. The next pro- 
duction will be on February 24. S. W. 
Kerley is president of the Theater Arts 
Club, with headquarters in the Elevat- 
ed Shops, 150 Powell street. 

* # * 

New Manager 

Herbert Polin, for some time con- 
nected with the publicity department 
of the Granada theater, has been trans- 
ferred to the St. Francis theater, as 
manager. 

( harles I - '.. kurtzmann, who has been 
in charge of the Si. Francis, will be 
manager of the Granada theater, the 
"home office" of the San Francisco 
chain of the Publix Theaters. These 
promotions follow the resignation of 



Edward Smith, formerly the manager 
of the Granada. 



A Little History 
The California School of Fine Arts 
was founded by the San Francisco Aw 
Association in 1X74; in 1893 is was ai 
filiated with the University of Califor- 
nia. It is a widely known institution de- c 
voted to the cultivation of the fine arts! 
and has produced many world famous 
attists. The old school had its first 
home over the California Market, 
across the hall from the old quarters ofl 
the Bohemian Club. Then the school 
moved to the Mark Hopkins mansion 
on California street, where it was still 
housed in a temporary structure after 
the fire. The new school is situated 
on the slope of Russian Hill, and built 
in the Spanish Mission style. 



An Irishman being awakened in the 
night by a cry of fire hastily donned his 
trousers and leaped from a second- 
story window. He alighted safelv on 
the ground, but stood looking downj 
at his trousers, which in his excitement 
be had put on hindside before. 

A fireman came up to him and said: 
"Did the fall hurt you, Pat?" 

"No," said Pat. "Devil a bit did it 
hurt me, but it gave me a divil av a 
twishl." — Judge. 



L 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

will bring 

ORDER 

Out of Chaos ! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements, 
Income Tax Reports. 

Expert Auditor 

Part-time Service 

268 Market St., Room 101 



CLUB 

Auto Service Co, 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For All Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



585 Post St. 
San Francisco 



february 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 
-ities That Should Be Included in Your European Tour. 
A MSTERDAM — Famous for its harbor, great docks ami 
l\_ canals. The Ryks .Museum, with its collection of paint- 
ngs by Dutch .Masters, among them Rembrandt's "Night 
watch." Zoological Gardens, Royal Palace, Exchange Build- 

BERGEN — The second city of Norway. Beautifully situated 

>n an arm of the Byfjord, and surrounded by mountains. 

ianquet Hall of King Haakon Haakonsson, 13th century; the 

fvskebrvggeu ; the old offices and warehouses of the Hanseatic 

eague ; the National Theatre, which is the mother-theatre of 

Norway; Bergenhus Fortress; the Hanseatic Museum. 

BERLIN — Capital of the German Republic. Unter den 

inden, Brandenburg Tor, University, Palace of Emperor 

Villiam I, Palace of Crown-prince Lustgarten, the Dom, tbe 

Soyal Palace, now a museum. 

BRUSSELS — Capital of Belgium. "The miniature Paris." 
rlotel de Yille. The Guild Houses. Thirteenth century church, 
3te. < iudule. Palais de Justice and Royal Palace. 

CHESTER — An English walled city replete with Roman 
nemories. In the Cathedral may be seen the old colors of the 
Chester regiment carried in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

DRESDEN — Capital of Saxony, famous for its architecture 
ind art collections. The Royal Palace with the Green Vault. 
File Picture Gallery containing over 2000 paintings, among 
hem Raphael's "Sistine Madonna," and numerous masterpieces 
n- German, Spanish, Italian, French and Dutch artists. The 
apanese Palace (museum of antiquities) and Museum Johan- 
neum. The Schloss, Hof, Frauenkirche and Sophien Kirche. 
EDINBURGH— Capital of Scotland, on the Leith River, 
near the Gulf of Forth'; home of Sir Walter Scott, Macaulay 
Bid Hume. The Castle, Holyrood Palace and Abbey, Parlia- 
ment House. Greyfriars' Churchyard, St. (ides' Cathedral. 

I'M IRENCE— "The Alliens of Italy," home of the Medici, 
sf Dante. Savonarola, Giotto, Fra Angelico and Botticelli. The 
(Jffizi and Pitti Galleries contain the supreme works of the 
Italian Masters, paintings and sculptures. Palazzo Vecchio, 
:he Duomo. Campanile, Baptistery with its gorgeous bronze 
loors, which Michelangelo considered worthj to he the gates 
>f Paradise. 

FONTAINEBLEAU— The sixteenth century chateau con- 
structed by Francois I, who said, "A court without women is 
ike a year without Spring and Spring without ruses!" Na- 
feleon signed his abdication in the Chateau in 1X14. The apart- 
nents of Marie Antoinette, Madame de Maintenon, Catherine 
le Medieis and Anne of Austria. The world-famous Forest 
E Fontainebleau. 

GENEVA — Capital of the League of Nations, Salle de la 
leformation, Monument of the Reformation. Palais des Na- 
iens. Capitol .if the League of Nations. Jardin Anglais and 
Jjiai du President Wilson. View of Mom Blanc, Ling of the 
Bps. Excursion on the fascinating Lake of Geneva. 

INTERLAKEN — One of Switzerland's most enchanting 
■sorts, with a view of the noble Jungfrau. The famous cir- 
ular tour of l.auterbnmncr, Scheidegg and Grindelwald will 
>ring us face to face with the majestic peaks and glittering 
now fields of the Bernese Alps. 

LONDON — Trafalgar Square, National Gallery, Edith 
itvell Memorial, Thames Embankment, The Temple, London 
'ridge. Tower of London. Tower Hill. Trinity Square, Man 
ion House, Bank of England, Lombard Street. Cheapside and 
Ed Jewry. St. Paul's, Ludgate Hill and Circus, Fleet Street. 
Bncoln's Inn Fields, British Museum. Bedford Square, Regent 
'ark, Wallace Collection, Oxford Circus, Piccadilly, White- 
mil. War ( Iffice. I louses of Parliament. St. Mai lurch, 
Westminster Abbey, Tale Gallery, Westminster Call 
torse Guards Parade. St. lames" Park. Marble Arch, Park 
lane, St. James Palace. Marlborough House. Pall Mall. etc. 
be < ■ " 1 1 ■ i in ■■■ 



BY ORDER OF S. GEORGE ULLMAN, 
EXECUTOR 



Five Hundred Items from the 

ESTATE OF 

RUDOLPH 
VALENTINO 

Consisting of Furniture, Rare Books. Antique Tapes- 
tries, Armor, Weapons. Jewelry, Brocades, Paintings, 
Art Objects and Laces, will be sold at 

PUBLIC 
AUCTION 



BEGINNING TUESDAY 

February 8, 1927, at 1 :30 P. M. and 7:30 P. M. 

Augmented by other valuable artistic properties from 
various consignors and estates at 

CURTIS STUDIO 

575 Sutter Street 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 192/1 




THE Western Railways Committee on Public Relations 
has issued a pamphlet against the proposed congres- 
sional legislation to abolish "surcharges" on travel in sleep- 
ing ind parlor cars. The conclusions of the Railways Com- 
mittee are summarized as follows: The removal of the sur- 
charge would (1) Reduce service rates for those best able 
to pay. (2) Result in raising other passenger and freight 
rates or (3) postpone reductions in general passenger rates 
or (4) postpone general reductions in freight rates on agri- 
cultural produce and live stock, or (5) interfere with and re- 
tard the general survey and adjustment, where possible, 
of freight rates as directed by the Hoch-Smith resolution. 
It looks as if the Railways Committee had a good case. 

The California Taxpayers' Association takes the position 
that taxes are too high. The fact is practically axiomatic 
today. All economists recognize it and its continuance will 
have an indescribably evil effect upon the development of 
the State. Reasonable economy is the slogan. However, no 
economy can be safely practised at the expense of the public 
schools, which are an asset, not a liability. 

* * * 

It is calculated that more than 100,000,000,000 barrels of 
crude oil can be produced from the oil shales of Colorado. 
Wyoming, Utah, Nevada and Montana alone. But it could 
not be profitably obtained unless the price of oil were to 
rise quite considerably, or there were to be a development 
of a new and indeed revolutionary method of mining. 

* # # 

Somebody ought to make an esthetic campaign on the ap- 
pearance of our street cars. Most of them are too shabby 
for words and do not do the city any good in the eyes of 
visitors from more careful towns. 

* # # 

The San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange is appeal- 
ing more and more to Eastern financial interests. The recent 
application for the listing of the capital stock of the Stan- 
dard Oil Company of New York representing one of the 
largest market values of any security listed on the San Fran- 
cisco Stock and Bond Exchange, is evidence of dominant 
position of the local exchange. 

* * i 

The capital structure of the Standard Oil Company of 
New York consists of 17,500,000 shares of capital stock of 
which 16,760.931 shares have been issued, and funded in- 
debtedness of the company and its subsidiaries, the Mag- 
nolia Petroleum Company and the General Petroleum Cor- 
poration, amounting to $61,956,500. 
* * * 

The new highway commission is taking up its work with 
alacrity and if it carries out its program, wil make notable 
headway in the development of the .slate highway systems. 
It will have to show much energy and ability to keep up 
with the work done by its predecessor. It may be frankly 
admitted, however, that it is starting well. 

* * * 

The part which the prison road camp is playing in the de- 
velopment of the California highway system may be seen 
from the following allotments made by the highway com- 
mission for the operation of prison road camps to the end of 
Tune, as follows: Yosemite lateral cam]). $89,000; Del Norte 
County camp, $120,000; Lake County camp, $28,000. This 
would have been considered an impossibility a year or two 
ago. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY I0TH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,550,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $565,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

IIAICHT STREET BRANCH Hnighi and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ullon St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4Vi) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up I ■ni.iinl $20,000,000 (20,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly 
and al REASONABLE RATIOS. OVER r,.1ii BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San Francisco Office: 450 California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Aaut. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer! of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS, ETC. 



San FrnncUco, Calif. 
444 Market Street 



Lou Angele*. Calif. 
5717 Santa Fe Avenue j 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS — AUDITORS — COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow- 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC— INSURANCE BROKER 

208 Crocker Bulldinc (Opposite Palace Hotel). Snn Francl.co 

Phone Kearny 391 



ebruary 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 



Ghirardelli Co. Celebrates 75th Anniversary 

History of Pioneer Chocolate Firm Linked With Romance of Early Days in San Francisco 




>OMINGO GHIHAKDKI, 
Founder of the Firm of 
I ►. f.hirnrilelli Coiiiimii.v 



REVIEWING three-quarters of a century of growth and 
progress, under the same management and almost in the 
ime location, the D. Ghirardelli Company of San Francisco, 
ioneer Pacific Coast manufacturers of chocolate and cocoa 
rpducts with a nation-wide reputation, is this year celebrat- 
ing its seventy-fifth anniversary in 
business. Announcement of the fact 
was made in the firm's advertise- 
ment in the January issue of West- 
ern Confectioner. 

As time is reckoned by geologists, 
a space of 75 years is hardly worthy 
of notice. Hut as time is calculated 
in the business world of today, par- 
ticularly in this comparatively 
young Western country, for a man- 
ufacturing linn to celebrate its 
seventy-fifth anniversary of contin- 
uous progress i- ranked as almost 
phenomenal. Few Pacific Coasl 
linns can boast 75 years of exist- 
ence. And fewer --till can boast re- 
laining in the same bands during all of that time ; perhaps this 
Stance is unique in that respect. The I >. ( ihirardelli < '< unpany 
as a romantic history, one closely interwoven with the Eound- 
lg and growth of San Francisco and California, but lack of 
pace here forbids more than a casual glance at it. 
The firm was founded in 1852 by the late Domingo Ghirar- 
elli, who directed its affairs almost until the time of his death 
1S'»4. lie started in business as an importer and retailer 
m bis first establishment, in the form of a combination whole- 
Be and retail store and factory, was located on Mason strei t, 
ear Jackson, where the firm dealt principally in coffee, spices, 
yrups and imported liqueurs. 

The business was later moved to a larger and more promi- 
ent location at what was tlun 138 Jackson street, near the 
orncr of Sansome. At that time the city's waterfronl was 
nly a couple of blocks eastward and thai wa- tin- bear! of the 
usincss and financial district. The location i- now numb re I 
11 Jackson street, and it wa- there that tin- first chocolate 
lanu Inclined in the West was turned out. It was ni.nl. of 
fisxican or Central American bean--, brought up the \M'M 
oast by sailing ships on the last leg of the journey around 
I I lorn, and the "factory" was a crude and minute affair. 
he beans, after being roasted, were pulverized b_\ band on ., 
nictate." a sort of stone washboard with a -tone pestle, such 
s was used by the aborigine- to grind corn and acorn-, ["he 
BOcolate "liquor" which resulted was mixed with sugar and 
narkctrd in the form of compressed cake-, which the pur- 
ba-er- grated or melted to use in making their chocolate 
leverage or ate as a sweet "from the chunk." 

It i- interesting to note thai the original "nictate. " the prin- 
ipal piece of equipment of the first "factory." i- -till in ex- 
fcnee and on exhibition in the office of the I Ihirardelli plant 
- one >>i the prized possessions of the firm. \nd a framed 
op\ of the Daily Alta California of September 25, 1853. 
rowing one t<\ the earliest advertisements of i lie firm, h 
imminently in the president's office. 
The production of the small packagi ; "ig" chocolate 

been a matter of comparatively recent years. In the late 
■ s the firm put out it- first "nickel package," in the form of a 
■O-ounce bat of dry. sweet chocolate under its well-known 
■gle brand and with a large facsimile oi a fi\ 
acb end n\ the wrapper label. 
It i- interesting to note, a- a guide to public taste at the 



time, that in 1890 the firm's books show sales of 13,000 pounds 
of bitter coatings and 12,000 pounds of sweet. In 1926 the 
Ghirardelli plant produced and sold a total of 14,200,000 
pounds of coatings, ground chocolate and cake chocolate. 

For Valentine's Day a large heart-shaped lollypop is manu- 
factured and put up in a box 20 inches long and six inches 
wide, highly decorated with ribbon and bearing the firm's sig- 
nature. The lollypop itself is tied with bows of ribbon so that 
it puts up an exceptionally attractive appearance. 

In 1895 the firm moved to its present location, buying an 
entire block of ground and several buildings from the old 
Pioneer Woolen Mills. Two of the original buildings, now half 
a century old, are still in use. Expansion has been continuous. 
In 1 ( X)0 a three-story warehouse was added to the group. In 
1911 two more factory buildings were erected. In 1916 the 
present office building, garage and power house were built, and 
in 1922 four more stories were added, two each to two of the 
buildings already in use. The D. Ghirardelli plant now occu- 
pies an entire city block on North Point street between Larkin 
and Polk streets and uses seven four- and five-story buildings. 
The interior of the quadrangle is beautifully parked and the 
north window- of the building command a wonderful view of 
San Francisco Hay and the Marin and Alameda shores. 

Tile I', (ihirardelli Company has remained a family corpo- 
ration since its founding, and the directors and department 
manager- are all grandsons of the original founder. I). Lyle 
Ghirardelli i- president and general manager; Alfred Ghirar- 
delli is vice-president, Harvey (ihirardelli i- secretary and 
plant manager and Louis ( Ihirardelli is sales manager. The firm 
affords continuous employment to 140 men and women and 
maintains warehouse -tuck- in Los Angeles, Phoenix, El Paso, 
Denver, Salt Lake City, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle. Spokane 
and Boise. 



The Russian Tea Room 

( Iccasionally one wearies of down town restaurants, how- 
ever excellent their cuisine, however attractive their service, 
and longs for "something different" in the way <d" dining 

out; something unusual in environment; something with a 
foreign flavor. 

I low would a cafe in a castle appeal to you, jaded down 
town diners: A restaurant opening out onto a terraced gar- 
den from which a -weeping view of the bay and Oakland 
bills ma) be viewed? A tea room where you can sample 
strange Russian dishes, or confine yourself to American 
food, as v on please? 

Mine. Igor Varipaeff announces the formal opening of the 
\\ inter Garden addition to the Russian Tea Room, on Tay- 
lor -licet, between Broadway and Vallejo, adjoining the 
Hillcre-t Club, on Saturday evening. February 12th, from 
-even to nine o'clock. 

There will be a Russian entertainment: dancers, singers, 
folk music, and Russian Gypsy s^ii;- i luests may dance. 
also, to the music of the Russian Balalaika Orchestra. 



CONFLICT 
By Wilbert Snow 
The sea is forever quivering. 
The shore forever -till ; 

And the boy who is born in a sea-coast town 
1- b< >rn with a dual will : 
The sun-burned rocks and beaches 
Inv eigle him to stay ; 
While every wave that breaches 
Is a nudge to be Up and away. 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1 



99 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 

Mrs. George Brown wore a pastel shade of blue taffeta in 
bouffant style. Mrs. John Delucchi wore a gown of black 
georgette and silver. 
Hand Painted Taffeta 

Mrs. A DeBenedetti was gowned in a hand painted peach 
taffeta in bouffant style. Miss E. Vannuchi wore a pretty 
ruffled blue crepe frock trimmed in pastel colored beads. 

Miss Rossi wore a peach taffeta dress in bouffant style. 
Miss Katherine Kelly wore a rose pink georgette frock. 

Norma Grosso wore a gown of green georgette with 
which she carried a flame ostrich fan. Miss Eda Terdera's 
frock was of orchid taffeta and net. 

Mrs. A. S. Musante's gown was of green crepe. Mrs. P. 
A. Bricca wore orchid georgette with a cerise flower. 

Kathleen Byam will give a program of character imper- 
sonations in the Paul Elder Gallery, Tuesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 8th, at 8:15 o'clock. Miss Byam's work is exception- 
ally brilliant and finished, artistic in its delicate and subtle 
interpretations of contrasting characters. She has a back- 
ground of professional training and stage experience. Her 
recital is given under the auspices of Eva Smith Hackett. 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



583 Post Street 
In Virginia Hotel 



MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



San Francisc* 
one Franklin 2510 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Established isiu 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

35S TEHAMA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
- Phone Douglas 3084 




LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTORS SERVICE STATION 

We Carry All Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing — Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 





Post 


ami Frank 


in Streets 




San Francisco, 


Calif. 



































CHAS. J. EVANS 

PALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED AND GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates: '■'■'><: per day; $7.50 per month. 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

SLv Floors for Service and Storage of Automobiles) 



Graystone 130 Open Day ar>4 Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specially 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

St. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general oAgent 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Sutter 2342 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 

EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 

Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

Repairing-, Oiling, Greasing:, Washing and Polishing; 

Gasoline : Oils : Sundries 



1140 GEARY 




TEL. GRAYSTOXE 42CC 



Metnl Work Apper- 
taining; to Automo- 
biles — Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding; — Black- 
■mithing;. 



AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WCRKS 



Let us save you wash day bother. 
It's an aid to beauty. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 



[2 



"Thi 1 Recommended Laundry" 



250 Twelfth St., San Francisco 



'Phone Market 916 



ebruary 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director or Publicity 
iXiitimiiil Automobile < lull 

jtrlTIIIN the confines of Sonoma 
» ' County, the motorist will find 
istorical districts that combine the le- 
endary lore of the Indians with the 
jcords of the Elizabethan seamen and 
terary districts which have been en- 
irined in poem and novel such as the 
Valley of the Moon." 

The presidio at Sonoma was the set- 
ng of the Hear Flag Revolution which 
ad a great deal to do with the admis- 
on of California into the Union and 
ere was founded the northernmost of 
le mission stations to serve as an out- 
ost for the traders and Indian tribes 
I the northern peninsula. 

You will find in the Napa Valley 
ich scenes as are to be found on the 
ailing hills of Italy. Along the banks 
f the Russian Rive/ are gigantic Red- 
'Ood forests, while a few miles outside 
f Santa Rosa is the Petrified Forest, 
■hich preserves in its varied monarch- 
le record of countless ages of the 
arth. ( >nly a few miles away are the 
pouting geysers at Calistoga and Mvr- 
Bale. 

On the shoulders of Mt. St. Helena, 
1st above the highway that leads into 
.ake County, is the monument that 
larks the spot where Robert Louis 
tevenson. the novelist, spent his 
oneymoon days and wrote "The Sil- 
erado Squatters." At (den Ellen is the 
lemorial library to Jack London and 
n the outskirts of the little town is 
le ranch upon which the novelist 
pent man\ happ\ years, Santa Rosa 
fas the location of the experimental 
ardcns of the late Luther Burbank. 
list outside of the town of Petaluma is 
le ol.l adobe which was the headquar- 
i the Spanish soldiers under Gen- 



eral Vallejo. This adobe structure is 
said to be the largest in the world. 
Petaluma, famous lor its chickens, Se- 
bastopol for its apples and Napa for its 
soda springs, are three interesting ob- 
jectives for the motorist making a tour 
of the County. 

Near Forestville is located the Bo- 
hemian Grove where the Annual For- 
est Grove Jinks of the Bohemian Club 
of San Francisco are held and three 
miles out of the town of Guerneville 
on the Russian River is Armstrong 
Woods, a county reservation and one 
of the finest stands of the giant Red- 
wood to be found anywhere on the 
coast. 

Sonoma is particularly attractive at 
this season of the year when spring is 
just around the corner, when the slopes 
are decked in their garb of green and 
when the early wild flowers are peep- 
ing out of their hiding places in the 
meadow-lands. History, romance and 
scenic beauty are all-season attractions 
in the county i if Soni una. 



Sequoia Club Calendar 

The lirst of a scries of international 
dinners will he held February 10th at 
6:30 p. in. at the Sequoia Club. lion. 
Gerald Campbell. Consul of Great Brit- 
ain, presiding as toastmaster. 

()n February 17th, the usual fireside 
meeting will take place at 9 p. m. Anita 
Day Hubbard will speak on "Recognition 
of "California Artists" at the meeting 
which will be held February 24th.- 



Save the Ducks 
Adopting as its slogan, "Increase the 
Water Areas and Save the 1 lucks," the 

Associated Sportsmen's Clubs of Cali- 
fornia i- leading a campaign through- 
out western and Pacific coast states for 
a fund of $10,000 to be used by the 
Biological Survey, C. S. Department of 

Agriculture in defraying the expense 
of a preliminary survey looking toward 
the re-flooding of Lower Klamath in 
California, Malheur Lake in Oregon 
and l'.ear River Marshes in Utah. Dr. 
E. W. Nelson, chief of the Biological 
Survey, has declared that, with this 
survey completed the work of re-flood- 
ing the areas mentioned might be ac- 
complished at a moderate expense and 
dried up marshes converted from death 
traps into healthy resorts for birds. 

Permanent correction of the existing 
condition, which is responsi- 

ble for the shortage of ducks through- 
out the west, las in the building of 
dikes and drilling of wells to impound 
and supply fresh water to these areas 
that they may again be made into vast 
feeding and breeding ground sanctuar- 
ies, .is th( Few years ago. The 
$11 1,1 1 : • to determine 
the cost of this work, no federal funds 
ailable tor the survey. 



Advantageous 

Comradeship reigns in this 
organization and it is re- 
flected in the service ren- 
dered. The employees are 
part-owners — and service 
is given with a smile. 



PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 




"►ACIFIC SEBV1CE" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 




The coffee 
liked by all- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6651 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

l,soo.OOo cnp» were .erred at the 

Pnn.inia-Paclllc International Exnoaltlo 






20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5. 1927' 



-^Siic/S* 



-#& 



<&* 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



"&J$J9» 



"■9\s 



♦jf** 




PRESIDENT -DOC" SHERMAN has had his handicap 
changed, which means that he will either have to shoot 
better gulf or quit the ministry. 

* * # 

Hugo Poheim says business is pressing in its 
demands so that he can no longer cut up on the 

links. 

* * * 

Tack Ellerv, the Fleischmann yeast product, 

shot a duck last week. 

* * * 

Hoyt Lesher, the doughnut king, claims he is 
not able to get' his score any lower than the holes in his 

doughnuts. 

* * * 

Knut, pronounced NUTE. not NUT, Lundstrom, the 
popular Powell street hatter, has made the announcement 
that from now on he is to be counted in the money. 

* * * 

Herb Bilsborough claims that 1927 will enable him to cut 
many strokes from his present 585. 

* # * 

Rigo De Luca, who spends his time with the chickens. 
says he is out for new worlds to conquer, now that he has 
broken 100. 

Al Evers, the smiling vice-president with the wonderful 
drawing power, claims the new handicapper has a grudge 

against him. 

* * * 

Rod Guyett says that, now he is relieved of the responsi- 
bility of the tournaments, he will spend this year in having 

his handicap lowered. 

* * * 

Ed Peterson, the tile bug, claims to have the only correct 
formula for making putting greens. 1 le said they all should 
be covered with tile and drained toward the cup. 



Claude Alexander's voice is changing and in the very near 
future he expects to join the croakers' chorus in the beauti- 
ful ballad, "What might have been." 

* * * 

Due to the fact that Line Johnson is such a good swim- 
mer, he says he prefers to play Presidio after a heavy rain. 

* * * 

"Commodore" Harry Speas has had to abandon his prac- 
tice net on his ferry boats during the rough weather. 

If the genial former President Walter Walsh could only 
play golf the way he drives his auto through Sonoma 
Count}' he would be a champion. How does the Santa Rosa 
jail appeal to you, Walter. 

* * * 

"Bud" Whitfield doesn't know a lot about golf, but he is 
a bearcat in using a spoon in the mouth. 

Charlie Elms won't be satisfied until the crowd plays at 

Li IS AltoS. 

* * * 

Jack Percy, the Montgomery street barrister, has just re- 
turned from the east where he regaled himself with a "dicer" 
hat. 



Andy Nelson, the buttermilk king, promises not to churn 
up the course this year. 

* * * 

Xiiitv I licks claims the reason he lias bettered his scores, 
in 1926. is because he used all the Safety Essentials. All, 
Norry? 

* * * 

Milton Ellis has been trying out a new pair of golf hose 

1 1" they help. Milt? 

* * * 

Elmer Miller says that l'<27 will be a rising year for him 
and warns his competitors to sidestep when he yells "Fore."! 

* * * 

Carl Thomson, when asked for a statement of how he ex 
peeted to golf in \\>27. replied that he had nothing to -av 
and then took 30 minutes to say it. 

* * * 

Gerry Brooks claims that his slogan of "1 Polk and 2 
Fell" will mean more than mere words in 1927. 

* * * 

"Phonograph" Hill Carson says he is going to make a 
new record this year. Why not try a new needle. Bill? 

* * * 

Mac McMullen, who -till uses the same ball he learned 
golf with 15 years ago. says that the next tournament should 
be held on a "brae bricht nicht." 

Carl Corwin has taken out more health insurance as he 
said that some of the score-, which were turned in made him 
sick. 

* * * 

Jim Arnott. the home builder, says that in 1927 he is goinj 
to build himself a reputation as a golfer. 

* * 

Jack Dalton says that while it may be true that Kelly 
Tires, he doesn't — on the golf links. 

* * * 

Bill Hollingberry is having his batteries charged in antici- 
pation oi a gi lod year. 

* * * 

bred Small say-- he is getting near the end of his string in 
having his handicap reduced. 

* * * 

Earle Wright, the radio magnate, claims thai if he doesn't 
soon break 120. he will tune in on another station or get a 
new set. 

Dudley Fish has sharpened his pencil in hope- that he 
will have a good year on the links. 

Frank Sutton has resolved that in golfing during 1927 lit 
will not dig so deep in real estate. 

( )h, ves, and Norman Farlow says — but what does it inat-l 
ter ? 

* # * 

Al Ferreira has had a new set of clubs made with rattan 
shafts. 

* * * 

Jinimie Browne, the smiling dentist, is still pulling for .' 
good score. 

* * * 

Marshal Scobey is still using the Edison Mazda lamps I 
guide him around the course. 



February 5, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



George Amies is contemplating building a 9-hole course 
it bis strip yard in Alameda. 

* * * 

'Grandpa" Charlie Goodwin is all set for the best year of 
lis career. More power to you, Charlie. 

"Tiny" Charlie Ash has resolved to attend all of the tour- 
laments in 1927. 

* * * 

Fritz Genske claims to be able to play the entire course 
on 2 strings. 

* * * 

Jack Winzeler says it is a "pipe" to "fitt-in" this game of 
golf. Come on in, Jack, the water's fine. 



Negotiations have been completed for the 1927 "little big 
game" series between the University of Santa Clara and St. 
Mary's College varsity basketball teams, to be played at 
Kezar Stadium in San Francisco on February 24, and March 
1, and on March 5, should a third game be necessary. An- 
nouncement of the dates was made officially today by Har- 
lan Dykes, Bronco coach. 

Coach Dyke is gradually building up a formidable squad 
and it is expected that the Bronco five will be at its peak for 
Ihe coming series with St. Mary's. 



Brokers' New Home 



It is not likely that any city in the world indulges the 
pleasant custom of "Saying it with flowers" to the extent 
that San Francisco does. 

They may have the money and inclination, but the blooms 
themselves are lacking. Even in Los Angeles, 1 do not re- 
member that business houses ever made such a lavish horti- 
cultural display as I have seen here, when different linns or 
stores move into new quarters. 

There was a veritable flower show in the new quarters of 
Peirce, Fair & Company, last Monday, in the three-story 
building which they have bad renovated for their purposes. 
at 432 California street, between the Bank of California and 
the Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Company. For 
ten years this company's headquarters were maintained at 
433 California street. 

The first outstanding attributes of this brokerage com- 
pany's new home seemed to be sunlight, air and masses .if 
blossoms, spilling their colors all over the place, when you 
stepped into the offices at 432 California street on the open- 
ing day. 

For several weeks the entire building has been under- 
going reconstruction and refurbishing, ami surely the build- 
ers should be proud of the results of their efforts, for they 
have created an atmosphere of brightness and comfort sel- 
dom found in the home of a prosaic business firm, and if 
Peirce. Fair & Co. experience all the good luck and 
wishes showered upon them on their opening day they need 

pave no doubt of their future prosperity. 



A statuette of the Babylonian Venus having bobbed hair 

with a fringe or bangs in front has been found. 

* * * 

At the modern wage rate, it would have cost more than 
66,000,01 > to constant the great pyramid «i Egypt, 

* * ' * 

Development of the I • of Florida is depriving 

the Seminoles of t'i . of livelihood. For centuries 

they have lived i they could get by hunting and fish- 
ing. 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. ISth and 19th Su.. 

San Francisco i'hnne Market 64 



A Link in a New Chain of Ferry Boats 

Quite often the spirit of a community is changed by me- 
chanical means, and substantial links are forged in iron and 
steel and wood, spiritually as well as materially ; every new 
ferry boat that plies the watery miles between San Fran- 
cisco and the adjacent shores around the bayT holds a deep 
significance in its operations, and brings the people of the 
different cities closer together figuratively as well as liter- 
ally speaking. 

The launching of the new Golden Gate Ferry Company's 
"Golden Bear" which took place last Wednesday, February 
2nd, from the Alameda plant of the General Engineering 
and Drydock Company, the first boat of the new fleet to 
operate between San Francisco and Berkeley, means a link- 
in a new chain bringing the east and west bay cities in closet- 
relationship. 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of A. O. Stewart, 
president of the ferry company, broke the christening bottle 
on the steamer and sent it down the ways into the waters of 
the Oakland estuary. 

Mayor Frank D. Stringham of Berkeley, and Andrew 
Gallagher, representing Mayor Rolph, were among the city 
officials who attended the launching of the new automobile 
ferry steamer, which will begin operations about the first 
of June. 

The "Golden Bear" has a carrying capacity of eighty-five 
automobiles ; it is 240 feet in length over all and has a 44- 
foot beam, with a depth of 17 feet. It will have a speed of 
13 knots an hour. It is electrically driven and equipped 
with three 400-horsepower Ingersol Rand Diesel engines. 
The lower deck is planned exclusively for automobiles and 
the upper deck is fitted with luxuriously furnished cabins. 
grill room and other conveniences for the traveling public. 

Around the same hour that the "Golden Bear" plunged 
into the waters of the estuary, workmen were busy prepar- 
ing the dock for the keel of the "(.olden Shore." another 
boat for the new fleet of the Golden Gate Ferry Company, 
operating between San Francisco and Berkeley. 

This is only another instance indicating the speed and in- 
genuity of the Golden Gate Ferry Company, under the able 
supervision of its general manager, Harry E. Speas. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained J 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. \ 



MADE TO ORDER ONL\ 



x lhosEKeat Shirts *lhosEKen& 

^HIF hStz. ^flffiiF 

Large Assortment of Imported Inbrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny 3714 




22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 5, 1927 




PIONEER 



The 

Name 
on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
printer or sta- 
tioner to show 
you samples. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 
Established 43 Years 



RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



'I 



San Francisco- 
West 703 



Phone Sutter 3278 



nurlinprame 
478 



William Herbst & Company 

(Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKNAKERS and WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME, ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street nt Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



875 rOLSOM ST. 



818 EMERSON ST. 



SAN MATEO— PHONE 1254-J 

PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

; San Francisco, San Jose and Way 
Points Twice Daily 



California Club Assembly 

One of the delightful Assembly 
dances will be held next Friday eve- 
ning, February 11th, at the California 
Club, 1750 Clay street. 

These dances are given on the sec- 
mid Friday of each month and have be- 
come one of the most enjoyable society 
institutions in the city. While the danc- 
ing floor is one of the biggest and finest 
in San Francisco, yet the attractive 
comfort of the Club rooms lend these 
parties the charm and intimacy of a 
private affair. The hostess, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Peterson Collins, is leaving nothing 
undone for the enjoyment of the large 
crowd which always attends. 

La Gaiete Cotillion 

Mrs. Rosetta Baker will give one of 
her lovelv Cotillions in the ( iold Room 
of the Fairmont Hotel next Saturday 
evening, February 12th. The elegance 
of the surroundings, the cordiality of 
the hostess, the colored lights playing 
over the dancers, the shining floor and 
splendid orchestra, all lend a distinc- 
tion and grace to Mrs. Baker's affairs 
that would be difficult to surpass any- 
where. 

The poetry of motion becomes more 
alluring than ever under her super- 
vision, and there is always a sigh of re- 
gret when the mystic hour of midnight 
approaches, and the participants of her 
hospitality prepare to leave for home. 



Many claimants demanded a valuable 
pearl recently discovered in England: the 
fisherman who got the oyster from the 
bed, the fishmonger who bought it. the 
merchant who sold it. and the servant 
who finally opened it and found the pearl. 
The judge awarded the gem to the man 
who finally bought the oyster. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
THE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, 

location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 18th day 
of January, 1927, an assessment of one-half 
cent per share was levied upon the issued 
capita] stock of the corporation payable im- 
mediately in legal money of the United States, 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company. 
Room 245, Monadnock Building, ,San Fran- 
cisco, Calif. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
remain unpaid on the 24th day of February. 
1927 will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on Thursday the 
24th day >'f .March. 1927 to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEELY, Secretary. 
245 Monadnock Building'. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



\\M A I, MEETING 
THE JOSIIl A HENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annua! meeting of the stock- 
holders of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will 
be held at the office of the corporation. N<>, 
7". Fremont Street, San Francisco, California, 
on Tuesday, the 8th day of February, 1927. at 
the hour of 10 o'clock a. m., for the purpose 
of electing a Board of Directors to serve for 
the ensuing year, and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meet- 
ing. 

CHAS. C. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

Oulcc and Works 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7913 
Branch Onlce: 700 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bldg.) 
Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 



Max Rosenthal 

// here Good Tailoring 

Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal, 
Sport and Business wear is now 
ready for your early considera- 
tion. 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
opp. olympic club 



USED 



Office: 75 Fremont Street, 
San Francisco. California. 



GARDNER, 

Secretary. 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 

EXCHANGE 

Phone Garfleld 3S52 504 Market St. 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^, 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Place 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

SOc, 75c, $1.00 35c, 50c, 75c $1.00,$1.50 a la Carte 
Dancing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL parties arranged 

headquarters for theatrical people 

Hattie Moosem Minnie C. Mooser 



ICECREAM^ 
CANDY 
PASTRY 




BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF. 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Rate. Exceptionally Reasonable 

Telephone 110 



LA CASA BIGIN 

441 STOCKTON STREET (By the Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 
Dancing- from « p. nt. to 1 a. m. 




OlkdL 



Caroline Jones 

Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30 

and tea from 3 to 5 

Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50— Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing rooms for banquets and parties, seating 75 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



AGUA caliente springs 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Agua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 



v-ALiltilN 1 Ej V 1L.L.A. CARL STEFFEN . PRO p 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hoars 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Street— Garfield 844 



O'Farrel) and 
Lark in Sli. 



BLANCO'S 



Phone 

Cray*. one 8100 



Weckdayi. Luncheon $ ,75 

(11 JO to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week Day. and Sondaye. 1.50 



No Visitor Should Leave the City With- 

out Dining in the Finest Cafe 

in America 



Our Main Dining Room it open again on Sunday t. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Building, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



NOAH'S 
ARK 

03 Third Avenue. SAN MATKO 



Featuring Southern Cooking" 
Open From 
11 30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m. 
5:30 p. m. to 8:30 p. m. 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 
tin If Block from Hichway 



cwiiCi. 



i_ 



U-Mtia Hov-i 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open 8:00 a. m to 11:00 p. m. 

unsurpassed ciisine 

Carl Leonhardt 

formfrh of Golden Gal« Park Canine 



FEW PEOPLE TAKE PROPER CARE OF 
THEIR TEETH 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once or twice a day la 
taking very good care of them. Brushing Is only a part off the 
process. Many things can happen to your teeth which only a 
competent dcntlNt can take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. A toothache means 
trouble: do not wait for the nche. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy teeth faster than 
decay. Are yonr teeth sore f Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My nerve blocking sys- 
tem blocks off all nerves and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 
908 Market Street (at Powell and Eddy). San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns: Self Clennlng Bridges: 

Porcelain Work nnd Roofless* Plates 



YOU SHOULD BE EXACTING ~ 

The Selected Artists 
at the 

Are Pleasing Your Friends 

CHIC HAIR-CUTS 

HAIR WAVING and CURLING 

TINTING 

CARE OF THE HAIR 

NATURAL CURL -PERMANENT 

FACIALS 

Jane Curran, Scalp Treatments, and 
PEGGY Sage, Manicure for Ladies and Gentlemen 



By A ppointment Only 



490 Post St., S. F. 
Garfield 23+ 



Ramon a Studio 
Palo Alto 433 

Hotel Dei. Monte 



Ci.ift Hotel, S. F. 
Prospect 4700 



Treatment Coupons at Reduced Prices 



THE 

OLYMPIC 

SEATTLE 




Finest and Largest Hotel 
in the Pacific Northwest 



Fr \xk W. Hull, Manager 



SAIL TO NEW YORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 



1 




Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



Panama Mail Liners Are Specialty limit for Service in the Tropica 

TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail Litter with 
ieven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore al picturesque and historic ports — Man- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Lifaerlad, Salvador; Corinto, 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; vigil Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an oul-ide one; each has an electric fan, 
and there is a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck panics and sports and salt water swimming lank. The Panama Mail is 
tvnrld-famous for its food and service. 

Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

The cost is less than S9 a day Tor minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
meal* on steamer. Go East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
tu little a? 8350. (Thia price dues not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
Mail liners leave Sun Francisco and New York approximately every 21 day*. Next 
tailings from San Francisco: SS COLOMBIA, February 1'': >> VENEZ1 I I \ 
March 12. From Los Angeles two days later. Westward from New York- SS 
VENEZUELA, February 5; S> ECI \UOK. February 26. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket ag.enl or write to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 

SSa S. SPRING STREET 2 PINE STREET 10 HANOVER SQUARE 

LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO NEW YORK 




"A Six-pointer' : 

"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It : 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 
Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 
Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 
Point 4 — A joy in the sick room. 
Point 5 — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 
Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 



Phone Market 117 



San Francisco, Calif. 






kauiu fKUUKAM^r UK NEXT WEEK, IN THIS L 1UE 




£5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 






Saturday February 12, 1927 



E 10 CENTS 
LOS ANGELES 



A RADIO FOR EVERY TASTE 



RADIOLA 
KOLSTER 
EAGLE 




ATWATER-KENT 
EAGLET 
ERLA 



ORTHOPHONIC VICTROLAS «-» BRUNSWICK PANATROPES 

Come in and hear your favorite records on these Marvelous 

instruments. Expect the Musical thrill of a lifetime. 

You will not be disappointed! 

YOU ARE INVITED TO VISIT OUR MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

SCHWABACHER-FREY 

735 Market Street ^557 Market Street 






JWbtor favs 2)e *(\ixe 



The DELAGE of France 



/ 


* 






i warm. " 


r^~. TM / H 









We are fortunate to 
offer Californians the 
privilege of owning 
that distinguished 
motor car of France 
THE PELAGE 



Seven-seater "Sleeping" Saloon — $14,000 — San Francisco 



The DUESENBERG of America 



2)UESENBERG 

Owners when dis- 
cussing automobiles 
can indulge in the 
superlative without 
fear of successful 
contradiction 




Custom Roadster With Supercharger — $10,500 — San Francisco 



LLOYD S. JOHNSON COMPANY 

1946 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, Calif. 




Established July 20, 1856 



$AN £?A??»8Co 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

ne San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56. by Frederick Marriott, Published by Frederick Marriott, 

:-., from 1SS4 to 1S25. Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott, 268 Market Street, San Francisco, California. 

elephone Kearny S357. Entered at .San Francisco, California, Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C„ 

London, England. Subscription Rates (including postage), one year. $5.00. Foreign, one year, $6.00. Canada, one year, $6.00. 



ol. CIX 



SAN FRAXCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 12, 1927 



P-H-E-W! 

By ELEANORE F. ROSS 



I 



I'lllXK," said I tn my Boss, "that 1 will write about 
■Vrt on my front page. There is a great battle just now, 
i art circles, between conservatives and radicals." 

My Boss snorted. He has a little habit of snorting at 
lanv of my suggestions. 

"Art !" said he. "Who's interested in Art in San Fran- 
iscn? A few artists and their friends. Five per cent, per- 
aps, of the population takes an interest in art, but every- 
iody is interested in the garbage question. We can get 
fcng comfortably without artists, but we cannot get along 
without garbage men. That's why artists arc Starving and 
Krbage men are buying expensive apartment houses, 
■rite about garbage this week!" 

From art to garbage ! 

I gasped. 

"But I don't like tu write about garbage," said I. tear- 
ully, "it is such a messy subject." 

"Not any mure messy than Art as it is today," said he. 
Write about garbage!" he added, sternly. 



"After all. are garbage and art so dissonant?" I think, 
il'ter 1 recover from this fell blow that has knocked me 
mm the sublime to the ridiculous; "Many a painting should 
I in the ash can. rather than banging in the halls of fame; 
md most of the pictures of the ultra-modernists resemble 
something swept up From the kitchen sink, instead of de- 
leting the poetical titles thai have been given them. The 
Sodernists, so to speak, have relegated art t.. the garbage 
an." 

As fur garbage 

Now, I have always had a horror of garbage men. 

The first one 1 remember was a son of Erin, with naming 
Id hair, red eyes, red face and large red bands. He used 
.1 ci'inc banging through our lovely garden, shouting Irish 
M.ngs and tilling the air with hideous noise. He possessed 
In- usual garbage man's ego, and was a law unto himself. 

do not believe that there was one member oi our taiuih 
vho would have had the temerity to tell him to make less 
a-kct. Even in those days, before the Scavengi 
•iatioii was heard of. we were at the mere) of the garbage 
nan. 

Today, if we "discharge" a garbage man for insolence or 
irelessness. oi what not. can we secure another to take 
E place Xo. indeed; the next week our garbage can re- 
nains vmemptied. 

\),. we object to bis fee of 25c or 50c for climbing each 
iditional flight of stairs? That's his price take it or leave 



it. He belongs to an association just as arbitrary, just as 
dogmatic as any of the unions, and he knows we are power- 
less in his hands. 

For years, oft and on, the question of how to dispose ol 
the city's garbage has been before the city fathers, and al- 
though the municipality has paid for a million dollar incin- 
erator, it has never functioned and is now being used as a 
storage house. 

Some of our Supervisors are for dumping our refuse onto 
tidelands, with the idea in mind of gradually filling in 
these territories, but the Board of Health has (rightfully) 
taken i'-sue with this proposition as eventually being the 
means of bringing hordes of rats into the city, besides being 
a menace to the people living nearby; others are for (lump- 
ing it into the ocean, but to paraphrase: "Cast thy garbage 
upon the waters, and it will return to thee after many 
days"; while the plan of cremating it. the only logical 
scheme that make.- for sanitation, is waived because of no 
cretnati iry ! 

It seems to me that, since the councilmen of this city arc 
incapable of finding a solution to this problem, such an or- 
ganization as the Industrial Association of San Francisco 
should step in and settle the dispute by creating a Munici- 
pal Garbage Plan, whereby the city itself takes care of its 
own garbage, and dispenses with the arbitrary actions of 
the Scavengers' Union! Why should we pay for the re- 
moval of our garbage any more than we pay for our streets 
being swept every week'? Or for sprinkling the highways 
and byways of the town, or lor keeping die railway tracks 
in condition? < »r for other duties attendant upon the gov- 
ernment of a big city? 

St. Louis has. for more years than I can remember, owned 
her own Municipal Garbage Company, which rids the city 
of its refuse without extra charge 11)1011 its citizens, and 
from the residue after a certain process which separates the 
oils and greas e (which it sells as a lubricant), produces a 
fertilizer which it puts upon the market for agricultural and 
horticultural purposes. 

Trust the thrifty descendants of the French to make prac- 
tical use of even— garbage I 



Of the two" burning local questions, perhaps garb:. 
the most important after all. for Art is an uncertain quan- 
titv; sometimes we have it. and sometimes we haven t : 
wliat one calls "art" the other scorns as a daub; what an- 
other praises, the modernists laugh at a~ "..Id fashioned, 
and so the befuddled public is loath to buy. 

But garbage! Alas, garbage, like the ] r, we have al- 

ways with us ! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 19271 




We wish that we could get the truth 

What Is the Truth? about the condition of affairs in the 

Soviet government at Moscow. Upon 

the truth and our knowledge of it depends much of the 

peace and prosperity of the world in the near future. 

Several Americans have come back from visiting Russia 
and have told us varying stories. Among them, that ol 
Chester Rowell, who was there in the summer, is the most 
reasonable and the most convincing. He says that there 
is peace in Russia; which seems to be the case, for we get 
no authentic stories of disturbance. He says also that there 
is good order and that the cities are not criminal places 
where there is no safety; on the contrary, he finds the 
streets of Moscow as safe for a young woman as those of 
any city in the world. He also says that the industrial po- 
sition is bad, which we have been told by others to be the 
case. But he says, also, that for the majority of the people 
it is no worse than it was under the Tsar and, perhaps on 
the whole, a little better. 

It is just on the subject of that economic industrial po- 
sition that we want more light. We know that the work- 
ers of Russia sent $7,500,000 to the striking miners of 
Britain and that this money actually came from wages. 
Also, we read this week that the government has ordered a 
diminution of working hours from eight to six a day; that 
working women have two months' holiday on pay before 
child birth and two months after, at the same rate of pay: 
that women raising children are given time for nursing, 
at full pay, during working hours; and that all workers are 
granted a month's holiday, with full pay, every year. 

This is what we do not understand. If the economic po- 
sition is bad, how can the government promise such con- 
cessions? For, having promised them, it must maintain 
them, otherwise the revolutionary indignation of the de- 
luded workers will throw it into the discard. 



There is a limit beyond which decent 
Libelling the Dead men do not go with respect to the 
dead. We are of the opinion that the 
old: "Say nothing but good of the dead" is too far fetched, 
because with public men. at least, there are necessities 
which transcend flattery, and it is better to know the truth 
about them than to have them dwell forever in a legendary 
world, removed from the ken of the ordinary. But it is 
clear that any such criticisms as may, in the interests of 
historic truth, be levelled at the dead, should be confined 
to the public activities with which alone the world in gen- 
eral is concerned. 

This applies to the recent British hubbub about the per- 
sonal morals of Gladstone, which some unknown and de- 
spicable scribe endeavored to convert into a means of 
money-making. He had nothing to go on but the rumors of 
the day and the scandalous talk of men about town whose 
prurient minds would find filth anywhere. There were 
even in Gladstone's time cartoons depicting 1 his taking a 
gay attitude towards street-women. But no one. till more 
than thirty years after his death, has ever ventured to make 
categorical statements with respect to his behavior. 

As a matter of fact, it would require much better evidence 
than has been presented to prove to the satisfaction of the 
world that the old statesman was not faithful to the tradi- 
tional morality of his faith and his class. He was in a peril- 
ous position during his entire political life. He was hated 
by the conservative aristocracy, which would have broken 



him in a trice, if they could have proved anything. He was 
the darling of the lower middle class, which carries the puri- 
tanical concepts of its evangelical religion to the extreme.] 
No one could have afforded less than Gladstone to play the] 
hypocritical part in family relations. He was no adventur- 
er in any capacity of life. His son is right in calling his 
traducer a liar and a fool. 



There is every reason why the 
An Extraordinary Success Ford Motor Company should 

be regarded, as it is throughout 
the world, as perhaps the most significant achievment I 
modern industry and finance. There are no limits to thei 
admiration which Ford lias inspired in the world outside ofi 
his own country. Germans and English, Russians, even/I 
consider him to be the most marked modern figure and the 
genius of twentieth century industry personified. 

Additional force is lent to this estimate by the fact that 
Henry Ford and Edsel Ford, within the last thirty days, re- 
fused an offer of a billion dollars for their stock in the Fordl 
Motor Company. It is very doubtful if ever before in his- 
tory, an individual was offered at once such a sum as a 
billion dollars. Yet, according to the testimony of JohnJ 
W. Prentice of Xew York before the Board of Tax Ap- 
peals, this was the amount tendered and refused. 

The same witness also testified that twice before had the 
same offer been made, in 1924 and in 1925. The witness 1 
stated that ever since 1916 the progress of the company 1 
had been so rapid that it was impossible to strike an aveH 
age for stock valuation and still more remarkable is tha 
fact that, during the panic of 1907 and 190S, when there was 
a general decline in industrial stocks, those of the Ford 
Motor Company kept on advancing. 

Such success transcends all ordinary laws governing in- 
dustrial finance. It is the product of genius, as individual 
and as remarkable, as the genius of a Napoleon. It rep- 
resents the quintessence of originality of thought coupled 
with an almost superhuman understanding of organization 
methods. The Ford Motor Company is Henry Ford, a hu- 
man phenomenon inexplicable in ordinary terms. 



We understand that the funds fop 
Rebuild Santa Clara the rebuilding of the Santa Clara 
Mission are coming in too slowdy.j 
We, therefore, urge upon our readers the duty of aiding in 
the restoration of this fine old Californian church. The 
fire which destroyed the edifice some months ago wiped out 
the entire building- The result is that one of our histories 
places lies in ruins, which is no credit to the people of this 
part of the State, at least. 

These missions are not merely churches; they are his- 
torical monuments of great importance and bound up in- 
dissolubly with the whole development of our magnificent 
Commonwealth. They are testimonials to the fact that we 
entered here upon a civilization which had many beautiful 
ami sacred features, not the least of which were the mission 
buildings which were the outward sign of the communal 
and spiritual life of the Spanish settlers. 

All over the world the fame of those missions has spread. 
Serra. Palou and the rest of the pioneers of civilization in 
this part of the world, have left indelible impress upon the 
culture of the race and it is our duty to recognize our in- 
debtedness to them and. forgetting what differences we 
may have with them in minor matters, to remember that 
they were in a very high sense the progenitors of the glory 
of a community which is only just beginning to enter upon its 
real path of glory. 

For these and many other manifest reasons it is our duty 
to support the efforts of those who are trying to recreate 
the beauty which was unfortunately destroyed and to help; 



ibruarv 12, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



ferpetuate the splendor which is attached to the very name 
I Santa Clara. 
All over the world, the perpetuation of historical monu- 

nents is regarded as a sacred duty. 



There is something, after all, in the 
The President Wins quiet resolution of the President, as is 
shown by the vote of the foreign af- 
airs Committee of the House, which maintained that the 
position taken by the President in the Mexican-Nicaraguan 
natter should be affirmed. This resolution, known as the 
Fairchild resolution, expresses its full concurrence with the 
bsition of the President. 

The vote was a party vote, with the exception that Repre- 
sentative Connally, a Democrat from Texas, voted in support 
3f the resolution so that he might have the power to move 
to reconsider, which, in the face of the facts, is one of those 
political maneuvers which bring abuse upon politics and cause 
politicians to be viewed with a sort of tolerant contempt. For 
a man who differs with a political expression, to vote his ap- 
proval of that from which he differs, in order to gain a tacti- 
cal advantage, is one of those complicated things to which 
men. in other matters apply devastating adjectives. 

Now, the resolution is a proper move under the circum- 
stances. The President has declared a policy. It is the duty 
of the Foreign Relations Committee to endorse or to repudiate 
that policy. According to the British system, a vote to re- 
pudiate would be followed by the resignation of the minister at 
the head of the government, a dissolution and a general elec- 
tion, if the vote of the committee were sustained by the 1 louse. 
Jlere. it would merely show that the President was out of 
sympathy with popular views on the subject of Mexico and 
Nicaragua. We think that the President should be sup- 
ported. We are of the opinion that the safety of the lives 
and the preservation of the property of Americans is not a 
matter to be arbitrated, but is a fundamental, without which 
we could not exist as a nation worthy of respect. 



The world is changing. The meek Chinese 
China Stands have turned and are now issuing ultimata on 

their own account. Peking, as well as Can- 
ton, are equally engaged in telling Great Britain when' to gel 

oil and the Chinese arc coming together in general disapproval 
of white domination. The world is changing, so rapidly, that 
Before this goes into print the whole situation may again have 
altered and no one can say where it will all end. 

British ships are on the waj with what looks like a large 
army, but which is. as a mallei- of fart, quite incapable of 
loping with anything like a force such as might be expected 
from the Chinese, if the) really intend i" make .i fight t ■ ■ i 
foreign expulsion. The officers of tin- Northern Army say 
that they will compel their general to si le with the Cantonese 

if any Chinese blood is shed, in pursuance of the British oc- 
cupation. Americans are hurrying marines and other sbips 
as last as possible to save their nationals. We have no con- 
cessions, we have no political grip on China and yet our na- 
tionals are in danger and already we have inflicted punish- 
ment of death i in certain i him 

The whole matter is tops) turvy. There is no doubt that 
the Chinese have been hitherto treated witl a great deal of 
contumely and that they have suffered many indignities. ( >n 
the other hand, with the break up of their old >\-ti'in. a nit'" 
of conflicting groups has arisen and there is no homogeneous 
nation with which foreigners can treat. The British have said 
that the) will treat with any authority which can claim to 
represent a United China. But, as a matter of fact, that 
United China will probably only be forged in the tires of strife 
with the foreigner and what that struggle may mean to the 
work! cannot even be conjectured. 



THE GREATEST AMERICAN 
By Eleanore F. Ross 

Till'" majority of great men anil women have become 
famous through incidental deeds in times of stress; or 
the occasional expression of great thoughts through the 
mediums of art. literature, music, mechanics and states- 
manship; but it is only the occasional man or woman whose 
whole life can be consistently described by the word "great." 

Such a man was Abraham Lincoln, whose natal day we 
are now holding sacred. 

The most illiterate American has a fair knowledge of the 
Emancipator's life, handicapped as he was, from birth, by 
all sorts of adverse circumstances; the most indifferent 
must surely thrill to the story of the boy Lincoln, who. com- 
ing from a shifting and shiftless stock, educated himself. 
with the assistance of a few short periods of schooling, into 
the intricacies of jurisprudence, and after twenty-four years 
as a practicing lawyer, statesman and congressman, into 
the highest position that an American can attain. 

All through his formative years, alternately so depress- 
ing and so exhilarating, Lincoln stuck to the conviction 
that the ethics of public and professional life, should, first 
of all, be honest. "Resolve to lie honest at all events," said 
he; "if in your judgement you cannot be an honest lawyer, 
resolve to be honest without being a lawyer. Choose some 
other occupation rather than one in the choosing of which 
you do in advance consent to be a knave." 

With his feet firmly planted on this substantial founda- 
tion of honestv, Lincoln would neither stoop to nor be 
patronized by any man. If patronage tried to shoulder 
him out of his steadfast position, he could stand like a 
rock, both in public and professional life. He was an un- 
usual combination of gentleness, firmness, seriousness. 
humor, humbleness and pride. lie was. in fact, as near 
a superman in his make-up as America has ever produced. 

Lincoln had not a spark of affectation ; wealth was no part 
of his ambition. "Wealth," said lie, "is a superfluity of 
things we do not need." lie concealed nothing of his 
humble stock nor his early disappointments. Rather, he 
found in those experiences, a rich fund of illumination, of 
wit. of conviction and of sympathetic response. He rose 
from his dis-illusionments, his down-falls, a stronger man 
than c\ er. 

I lis Gettysburg declaration is one that will endure in- 
definitely, for the reason that when he stood where his 
countrymen had fought and died for the principles he 
upheld as President, he knew himself to be the medium 
of those "honored dead" and that through his living lips 
the dead lips of thousands of American heroes were speak- 
ing. 

"Four score ami sc\cn years ago," be exclaimed, "our 
fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, con- 
ceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all 
men are created equal ... In a large sense, we cannot dedi- 
cate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. 
The brave men. living and dead, who struggled here have 
consecrated it far above OUT power to add or detract. The 
world will little note nor long remember what we say here, 
but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the 
living, rather to be dedicated to the unfinished work which 
they who fought here have thus far s,, nobly advanced. It 
is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task re- 
maining before us. — that from these honored dead we take 
increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the 
last full measure of devotion. — that we here highly •■ 
that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation 
under God shall have a new birth of Freedom, and that 
Government of the people, by the people, for the pi 
shall not perish from the earth." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1923 




>LMSURE'SW^ND 



obey no waND buj pleasure's 

_ lorn Moor>e- 




What's the Program? 

ANNOUNCEMENT of the San 
Carlo Grand Opera season at the 
Curran Theater, beginning with the 
performance of "Tosca" Sunday night, 
follows the showing of the motion pic- 
ture, "What Price Glory," which will 
be screened at the Curran for the last 
times Saturday, February 12. 

Right next door at the Wilkes Thea- 
ter is "Castles in the Air," the musical 
comedy, which continues to draw 
crowds. 

( Ither programs at the local theaters 
offer a wide diversity of attractions. 
Select them all— and make no mistake, 
for the oftener you go to the theater 
the fuller and more rapid will be your 
ideas— and. we predict, the happier 
will you be ! 

That is — if you really want to be 

happier ! 

* # # 

Curran 

Sixteen performances and fifteen dif- 
ferent operas will be given by the San 
Carlo Opera Company at the Curran 
Theater, beginning Sunday night, Feb- 
ruary 13. with "Tosca." 

"Traviata" is booked for Monday 
night; "Carmen." Tuesday night; 
"Aida." Wednesday: "Rigoletto" will 
be sung Thursday night; "Andrea 
Chenier," Friday; and "Faust," Satur- 
day matinee; "Trovatore," Saturday 
night. 

That's this coming week, and the 
second week there will be a complete 
change of program, the only repetition 
being "Aida," which will be sung the 
following Saturday evening. 
$ * * 

Wilkes 

"Castles in the Air," the Edward D. 
Smith production, has caught the at- 
tention of the town. It is "packing 'em 
in" at the Wilkes, presaging a contin- 
ued run for this merry and tuneful 
operetta. 

Eighty principals appear in this mu- 
sical comedy, vocalists, dancers and 
comedians vying for favor with the ex- 
cellence of their arts. 

It is well produced, the costume-, 
the stage settings, the music, the ly- 
rics, the dancing and the acting being 



By Josephine Young 

( )ne is pleased, amused and kept at a 
high pace of appreciation. 

Eva Olivotti, Marie Wells. Wynne 
Gibson, Perry Askam, Kay Raymond, 
Margaret Bourne, Barney Gilmore, 
Alan I. owe. Guy B. Kibbee, Charles 
Miller. Sergei Arabeloff, Milton Pope, 
David Preston and Louise Lynch are 
the leading principals. But. in addi- 
tion, are other- whose cleverness am! 
ability, skill and good look- add charm 
to the fanciful i iperetta. 



Columbia 

In last week's issue we reviewed 
with pleasure the attraction. "Loosi 
Ankles." playing to crowded houses a! 
the Columbia Theater. 

If you haven't yet seen this magnetic 
play, do go this week, for it is sched- 
uled for one more week only, the last 
performance being for Sunday night. 
February 20, and you can't afford to 
miss it — that is. if you are awake and 
feel the pulse of Youth beating in your 
veins. 

Louis O. Macloon has given "Loose 
Ankles" a faultless production. 

Nancy Carroll is the pretty heroine 
of this gigolo play and she is bewitch- 
ingly naive throughout. But what 
strikes one as outstandingly clever are 
the dialogues between Art Miner and 
Ken Brown and their analyses of the 
women with whom they have to dance 
in their new business of being a gigolo. 
Their line of talk is refreshingly witty, 
acutely clever and — startling. Allen 
Connor come- in for some of the hero 
work, which be does well. Jack Car- 
rington becomes the buffer for their 
plot work as an unsuccessful villain. 

"I wouldn't miss seeing 'Loose An- 
kles' for a good deal." said an enthusi- 
astic. 

Neither would I. 

* * * 
President 

Leneta Lane is making record at 
the President Theater, where she ap- 
pears in the title role of "The Little 
Spitfire," now starting on its ninth 
week. The sparkling comedy seems to 
prove so fine a relish that patrons pack 
the house, many often going several 
times, and we don't blame them in the 
least ! 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 



Alcazar, 
••if 

Dull 


O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Wan Rich.*' Comedy-drama, 
y players. 


Henry 


Columbia, 70 Eddy 

"IjOOfle Auklfs,'* 

Carroll. Louln < 


Comedy-drama, 
>. Macloon pnui 


\noey 

lli'l iou, 



Curran, Geary nr. Mason 



"What Price tilory," Cox Protlncl ion. 
Last (omen today. Srui Curio (.rami 
Opera, in- u in ii i it u S ii ii day nii; h i , I'Vli, 
i-'-: Hi performance!*, i ~> diflVrent operas, 
Alice Gentle, "Carmen," "TuHca," Open- 
ing niiihl. 



President, McAllister nr. Market 

"The Little Spitfire." Henry Dully ( imii- 

edy; Leneta Lane in < ■ < I «- role. 



Wilkes, Geary at Mason 



"CaMtleS in the Air." niusieiil cmiH'il)", 



VAUDEVILLE 



Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

"Hello-Goodbye." 15 scenes, Irene 1(1- 
cardo, character comediennes I led inn 
and \an Bowers, Jnfrfrlers. \paehe 
dance*. "Risky Business," Vera Key- 
no Ids, Kenneth Thomson. 



Orpheum, O'Farrell and Powell 

Mildred Harris, in person. "Movie Mad." 

Elffhl jiirls, dance revue, -San I'ran- 
dsco Kiisemblc." "The I* I as I ere n*," 
comedy act. O'Donnell and Blair. "Loi 

Mates." Italph Me von. Hell triee Clin 

Lonls London, character Hongm. 



Pantages (New), Market at Hyde 

\ est a Victoria, character sons*, it us eh 
Sisters, Harry t tin In pin anil M offal 
loil'Vs Orchestra. Acrobatic Novelty. 

Catiline Crcderick, "Devil's Island." 

Union Square, O'Farrell nr. Powell 

Herbert Rawllnson ami Grace Darmonfl 
"The Midnight Thieves." Sat., with live 
vaudeville nets. 



Wigwam, Mission and 22nd 

\ niMleville-Pieture.s. 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOW \ TOW N 



California, Market at 4th 

"What Is i.ove's Greatest Mistake?" 
from Liberty Serial Story. Kvelyn llrcnt 

and \\ illinm Powell. 



Cameo, Market opp. 5th 

Lon chaney in "Paul iii Advance*" vviih 

Prutcllla Dean anil Dorol liy Phillips; 
will run 7 days. Special colored lllinw 
also. Neves reels. 



Casino, Ellis at Mason 

Popular p let ii res, changed frequently. 

Granada, Market at Jones 

"Paradise For Two." Itlchnrd Dlv. 



St. Francis, Market bet. 5th-6th 



"The Fire Brigade." 



elmiarv 12, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



/arfield. Market nr. Taylor 



*'.lns( Another Blonde,*' Dorothy Mac- 
knill. Hiihc Wolf iincl his baud. 



lhambra (New), Polk and Green 

•"The Family I pstnirs." Saturday and 
Sunday, Virginia Valll ami Allen Simp- 
son. 

loyal, Polk nr. California 

Special Pictures. 

irand Opera 

Starting Sunday NlgHt, Fehrunry 13. 
San Carlo Opera Company. Alice Gen- 
tle; Opening Night, ••Tosca," "Tafuro." 

ilcazar 

If I Was Rich," the New York 
omedy by William Anthony McGuire, 
ifhkh started its engagement at the 
vlcazar last Sunday night, is sparkling 

it h fun. 

Henry Duffy seems to pick them 
hat way. Furthermore, he is giving 
he comedy attention to details and 
Lever once slacks up in requirements 
or finished work. 

Howard Hull Gibson, hailed from 
he Fast as a star, especially for this 
:omedy, certainly lives up to expecta- 
ions. Vivian Moore, Edward Brooks 
md Cay Seabrook are other principals. 

Phil Tead, Helen Keers, William 
Ibram, Dorothy La Mar, Henry Cau- 
Isens, Frank Darien arc players well 
mown. Leo Christal, Eunice Quedens 
|omplete the cast. 

"Twelve Miles Out," "Six Cylinder 
Love" and "The Heights" were also 
written by the author of the present 
Alcazar play. 

* * * 

Cameo 

I. on Chancy will he the screen at- 
traction this week at the (ainco Thea- 
ter. 934 Market street, in "Paid In 
Advance," in which Priscilla I 'can and 
Borothy Phillips are principals. This 
Ihotoplaj will he screened for seven 
.-lays at the popular Cameo. 

Those who were thrilled by the cin- 

pna celebrity in "Notre Dame," "The 

Hunchback" and "The Phantom of the 
Opera" will have another chance to 
lee this famous star of the silver 
Icreen in the picture shown at the 
Cameo, beginning with the Saturday 
performance, February 12. and con- 
tinuing until Saturday. February 1" 

Priscilla Dean is the heroine of the 
Itor) with it^ romantic situations, its 

thrilling episodes ami the Hashing 
Ston which speeds through the fabric 
of the plot. 

( (ther films, including news reels and 
educational pictures, are on the pro- 
gram. 

» * * 

Alhambra 

"The Family Upstairs" will he the 
feature of the Alhambra screen. Polk 
street near Green, today, Saturday, and 



tomorrow, with Virginia Valli and 
Allen Simpson the stars. 

In this story are characterized the 
troublesome neighbors, the fretting" 
woman, the meek man and the mix-ups 
generally of the family. Miss Valli is 
fast becoming a screen heroine who 
delights in fun-provoking scenes, and 
Allen Simpson has the role of opposite 
to this pretty and fascinating star. 

Walter Rudolph, "wizard of the 
ivories," as he is called, and his melody 
masters present concert numbers every 
evening and the programs are certainly 

excellent. 

* # * 

Orpheum 

Mildred Harris, one of the screen's 
most popular stars, is to return to 
vaudeville and will be the headliner at 
the ( trpheum Theatre for the week be- 
ginning this Saturday, when she will 
bring her own company of players to 
present a one-act play called "Movie 
Mad," which is said to be an episode in 
studio life. 

The entire show will be new and 
will include many big feature acts such 
as The San Francisco Ensemble, a 
dancing revue headed by Lester Lane 
and Elsie Travel's, and assisted by 
Eight San Francisco Beauties, who are 
ni w being rehearsed under the direc- 
tion of B. Herbert Shaver, one of New 
York's leading dancing instructors; 
Louis London in character songs; 
Charles O'Donnell and Ethel Blair in 
a comedy classic. "The Plasterers"; 
Tabor and Greene, "Two .Dark 
Knights"; Ralph Bevan and Beatrice 
Mint and their company in "Love 
Mates"; The Taketas in inimitable 
feus of dexterity; and several other 
big feature acts to he announced later. 

* * * 

Warfield 

"Just Another Blonde," a charming 
story filmed from the late Gerald Beau- 
mont's short story, "Even Stephen," is 
mnced as the next screen feature 
at the Warfield, beginning Saturday. 
It i> a fast-moving comedy of a couple 
ol Bowery gamblers and their Coney 
Island sweethearts. Dorothy Mackaill 
and Jack Mulhall are featured, and 
William (.'oilier, Jr., and Louise Brooks 

have the second leads. 

In "Just Another Blonde," Miss 
Mackaiil is pictured as a dance hall 
-- at an amusement park. With 
her closely cropped blond hair and her 
slim, lithe figure, she makes a perfect 
hostess, looking the part ami fairly 
sparkling in it. Jack Mulhall. who has 
been rapidly forging to the front 
among the screen's young leading men. 
gambler in charge of ;i crap-shoot- 
ing table. Louise Brooks plays the 
part of a hard-boiled attendant at a 
shooting-gallery, and William Collier, 
|r.. is admirably cast as Mulhall's pal. 



Jan Rubini, eminent violinist, heads 
the cast of the Fanchon and Marco 
stage presentation, and Rube Wolf and 
his greater band will give another of 
their excellent musical programs. 



Golden Gate 

Starting with next Saturday's mat- 
inee, the Golden (late will offer "Hello- 
Goodbye," Jean Bedini's mammoth 
musical revue, presented in fifteen 
scenes. The offering is made up of 
spectacular scenes, farce drama and 
singing and dancing numbers. The 
cast is one of many stars, including 
Irene Ricardo, Frank Hurst, Jean Be- 
dini, Eddie Vogt, Miss Bunny B., 
Bluch Landolf, The Di Catanos, Miss 
May Myers, and the Six Hello spe- 
cialty girls. 

A second feature of the bill is Irene 
Ricardo, well known character comed- 
ienne and song star, in her comedy of- 
fering, "Whoa, Pagliacci." She is a 
personality star with a new manner of 
song presentation. 

(Continued on Page 19) 



GARAGE 

Open all Night 



FOR THE BUSY MAN 

Have your automobile work 

done while you are at the 

Theatre. 



REPAIR ALL MAKES 

DUCO REFINISHING 
WASH AND POLISH 

GREASE AND OIL 

GENERAL STORAGE 

TOWING 




1000 Van Ness at O'Farrell 
San Francisco 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 19'A 






Are the Society Girls 
Successful Mannikins? 

QUERIES as to whether society girls are a success in pos- 
ing as mannikins were definitely settled, this past week, 
at least in the minds of many. 

Some there are. however, who contend that the profes- 
sional mannikin is the greater success. They base their 
opinions on the fact that the mannikin who makes a busi- 
ness of posing in the latest dictates of fashion knows how 
to walk, how to best display the gown, how to bring out all 
the features of mi-lady's frock. 

Ah, that's just it! 

The professional mannikin naturally thinks of the gown, 
itself, that she is displaying. But is that, after all, what 
makes for smart attire? Personally, I do not think that it 
is! 

When one wears an exquisite gown, or the smartest of 
frocks, so that the personality of the wearer is enhanced, 
rather than outdone, by what she has on, then, in the 
opinion of one, at least, "does the gown fulfill its particular 
mission in life. 

Sincerely. I believe that the born-in-society girl does not 
care one half so much whether the gown is beautiful or not 
as she does as to whether that particular gown makes her 
more beautiful. 

Surrounding herself with the latest dictates of the ever- 
changing modes, the really smart dresser makes the most 
of herself — foremost. That is why we perhaps, at least 
some of us, claim that the Society girl makes the better 

mannikin. 

* * * 

For Junior League 

Discussion of the question of mannikins and frocks was 
brought about by the fashion show of last week during 
the tea hour at the Mark Hopkins Motel, when members of 
the Junior League modeled for the benefit of the Junior 
League of San Francisco. 

The fashion show was a decided success. It attracted 
business men and the elite of local society, the peninsula 
set and the fashionables of Piedmont. It added materially, 
to the funds of the new temporary home for homeless chil- 
dren, beneficiary of the Junior Leaguers. 

Furthermore, it was, altogether, a lovch sight! 

* * * 

Hark, the Wedding Bells! 

Every mail brings to the society editor's desk dainty little 
cards, with diminutive wedding bells attached. 

It would seem as if Cupid were a busy fellow these days, 
in fact he appears to be working overtime. Thank good- 
ness for that, for in all the world, there is nothing sweeter 
than Love's young dream. 

* * * 

Home Again 

Every day. in some one of San Francisco's leading hotels, 
returned travelers are being welcomed home, after their 
' tours of the world, of Europe, the Orient or other lands. 



By Antoinette Arnold 

It seems as if everv one. one knows these days, has jui 
returned from Europe, or is just going abroad. 

.Mrs. Milton Unger, popular in musical and literar 
circles has been the honor guest at many of these "homj 
again" bridge-teas, luncheons or dinner parties. 

One of the brilliant social affairs given in compliment til 
Mrs. Unger, who recently returned from Europe, when 
she spent many months in Italy, France and the Britisl 
Isles, was a bridge luncheon given at the Fairmont I Iote 1 
by Mrs. J. C. Flood. 



SANTA MARIA INN 



Santa Maria, California 



On ihe Coast Highway Halfway Between San Franc 
An Inn of Unuiual Excellence 
Wire or mt4j« for reservations on your next trip goutk 



d Lei Angela 



Shower of Blossoms 

Spring flowers in their rarest varieties were used in th< 
decorative scheme of Mrs. Flood's bridge-luncheon whicl 
took place in the stately gray room of the Fairmont. F.acr 
table was elaborately decorated with Mowers and candelabra 
with tall candles. 

Mrs. Joseph A. Kendrick, Mrs. J. Emmett Hayden, Mrs 
Robert Dollar and Miss Mabel Tadich assisted Mrs. Flooc 
in receiving. 

* * * 

Old Fashioned Garden 
Motif of Luncheon 

Intending to have something out-of-the-usual, and yetj 
particularly attractive, Mrs. Henry R. Stellpflllg entertained' 
several friends at a bridge-luncheon at the Fairmont Hotel, 
using as the decorative motif an old-fashioned garden. 

Petunias, sweet peas, daffodils, roses, were charmingly 
Combined for the table decorations and the place cards were 
of the same combined design. 

People From Elsewhere 
Are Domiciled Here 

Prominent visitors from various parts of the world havel 
been making their home at the Fairmont Motel, tin- li-t 
including Mr. and Mrs. C. II. Backus of Washington, I). C: 
Mrs. Charles S. Wilson of Denver and Mrs. Cora Costelt 
who have now left for Honolulu. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Blackiston of New York; Mrs. Julian 
Armstrong, Miss Armstrong of Chicago and Mrs. F. D, 
Stout of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Sherman of Chicago 
and Mrs. \\ . T. Johnson, with her sister. Miss Marx L 
Johnson of Pittsburg, have been spending considerable time 
at the Fairmont, where many California friends have ex- 
tended their greetings. 

* * * 

Gold-and-Green Luncheon Given 

An elegant gold-and-green luncheon was given at the 
Fairmont Motel by Mrs. Joseph I. Phillips, recently, all of 
the decorations being a combination of the colors with a 
mound of early jonquils used for the table center, with the 
green feathery ferns placed in clusters. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 



flM> Buah Street, Between Powell and Stockton, 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



San FronoUeo 



Bruary 12, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



thleen Norris 
esses Home-Life 

Snerican home life and the inclinations of 
modern-day youth were fluently and con- 
icinglv discussed by Kathleen Norris, fa- 
US California author, at the literary session 
Cap and Bells, last Friday, in the Fairmont 
itel. 

'The girl of today is the logical fruit of the 
1 of the late nineties," stated Kathleen Nor- 
in her brilliant address before the book- 
■ers of the literature department, Cap and 
lis Club. 
/hy?" 

'Mothers of today who can't answer the 
liys ?' of Youth, — why one should go straight, 
ly one should stay sober, why purity and a 
irth-while code of life, why have self-control 
Bey are the ones at whose door should be 
d the blame for present-day flaming Youth, 
9 flask-pocket, the jazzy parties, and the lack 
courage which has lead so many boys and 
•Is to the bar sinister of self-destruction." 
Mrs. Norris quoted an overwhelming num- 
r of suicides among the young people of today, 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 
750 Sutter Street 

San Francisco's Finest 
Family Hotel 

250 Rooms 
Rates: From 52.50 per day 



attributing 



e fatal act to lack of confidence in their elders, and the 
:k of faith in themselves. 

* * * 

'liters Present 

The California room of the Fairmont Hotel was packed 
capacity the day Kathleen Norris spoke to the literary 
Iks. Hundreds of mothers, educators, many young writ- 
s and a group of young people hemmed in around the 
minis author, gratefully expressing appreciation for her 
jquent and timely discourse. 

Mrs. Norris is leaving today, Saturday, lor New York, 
I council with publishers over her books and future syn- 
cated articles. 

alkalogues 

Josephine Swan White, well known dramatic reader, who 
iginatcd a certain presentation of piano talks, or canlil- 

tions, and who studied with David Bispha'm, gave two 
adings: "The House By the Road"; and "To the Woman 

the 1 lome." 

Mrs. fohn Sylvester Pinney presided at this event, Mrs. 

■ssc Whited gave an outline of modern-day literature and 
rs. Henry Hastings gave a reading, "Diplomacy Begins 
t I Ionic" written by Kathleen Norris, honor guest and 
leaker of the noteworthy day. 

* * * 

est Home Ever 

"The American home in reality is the finest home in the 

oild. Next comes the English home from which it 

fang," said Kathleen Norris. "And onl\ from a genuine 
Hue can spring the ideals which will keep straight the 
outli of today, help him to meet an\ emergency and to 

pie i 'lit conquerer." 

* * * 

en Years Old 

Lincoln Park Woman's Club celebrated it- tenth birthday 
•ith a breakfasl at the Hotel Mark Hopkins. The program 
•as given In Miss Evelyn Merrill. William Friedricks, Mis- 
label Kellogg, Miss Alice Bradley, Mrs. 1. J. Pratt and 
It- V II. laylor. Mrs. A. II. Hankersoii presided and 
lis, Charles M. Weile and Mrs. K. V. Phillips were hos- 
Bses The committee in charge were Mrs Leo Barnes, 
lis. Sadie Chapman and Mr-. I. C. Mi ss 



Pleasure Rounds 

In honor of Mrs. Augustus Spreckels, who 
has been enjoying a round of hospitality since 
her arrival in Burlingame from New York, 
Mrs. Richard McCreery gave an informal 
luncheon party at her home on the peninsula 
recently. Some of the women present were: 
Mesdames Augustus Spreckels, Robert Hays 
Smith, George Newhall, Arthur R. Vincent, 
Jane Dunn Dutton, Walter Filer. 

* * * 

To the Country 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Wilson have gone 
to Los Gatos, where they have established 
themselves for the spring and summer months. 

* * * 

Aviator Ace's Relative Feted 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Selden Wright, who 
have been visiting the former's sister, Miss 
Nannie Wright, at the family home on Lom- 
bard street, have returned to their ranch in 
Stockton, where they have been making their 
home for several years. 

Mrs. Wright was formerly Miss Byrd Hop- 
kins, daughter of the late Commodore Hopkins, U. S. N., 
one of the first to be in command at Mare Island. The 
family is related to Commander Richard Byrd, the famous 
aviator. 

* # # 

Miss Vere de Vere Adams gave a dancing party Tuesday 
evening at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
Uhl, on Pacific avenue The affair was in honor of her 
sister, Miss Schatze Adams, and the hitter's fiance, Theo- 
dore Weicker of New York. 

* * * 

At El Mirasol 

The past week-end has found many distinguished and 
prominent people sojourning at El Mirasol, Santa Barbara. 
The lovely Lady Diana Manner-, who played the part of 
the Nun in The Miracle, arrived with a party of friends for 
a brief visit. With her were Mr-. Vincent Astor and Mrs. 
Ilarriman Russell, Lytic Hull and Bertram de N. Cruger 
of New York, and Captain Alastair W. Mackintosh. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert llerter. of East Hampton. Long 
Island, have also been guests at El Mirasol recently. Mr. 
I lerter is an artist of m ite. 

Among the well-known people from the Bay District 
who have -topped at I'd Miras,.! lately are: Mr. and Mr-. 
I'. ( ). (,. Miller. Mi-- (dive Watt. Mr-. Donald Y. Camp- 
bell and Mr. Noel Sullivan of San Francisco; and Mr. and 
Mrs. \\ . S. Palmer of Alameda, also Dr. Mariana Bertola, 
of San Francisco. 



I itl\ members of the 1 '. 
brated the 20th anniversary 
day party at The Clift on 



\. R., Tamalpai- Chapter, celc- 
of their Chapter with a birth- 
Sat urdav afternoon. February 
5th. The quests were seated at a U-shaped table, in the 
center of which was placed a small circular table bearing a 
huge birthday cake, iced with white and decorated with 20 
blue candle- and the I). A. R. emblem in dark blue. The 
color scheme of dark blue and white was carried out in the 
table decorations, and at one end of the room a large Am- 
erican flag was draped. Business matters and musical en- 
tertainment occupied the guests before and during the tea. 
* * * 

At the Whitcomb 

Distinguished guests from eastern points who regis! 
at the Hotel WhitCORlb for the winter season include Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Chapman and Miss Jane McCallum of 
Providence, R. I. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman have spent 
(Continued on Pas> 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 19271 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 





C. J. Pennlnjetnn 

Aerial Pirates 

AS WE once read: "What is needed 
in radio reception is a fading secre- 
tary," which seems to have become a 
necessity for anyone owning a receiv- 
ing set who desires an evening's pleas- 
ure. The listening to any special pro- 
gram is becoming positively disgust- 
ing, to put it mildly. And if Congress 
fails to pass the much needed legisla- 
tion, set owners may as well toss their 
receivers into the garbage can and turn 
their attention to some other method 
of entertainment. For it is certainly 
no pleasure to listen to programs with 
the mess of stations on the air which 
are now cluttering up the ether. 

No doubt the better broadcast sta- 
tions are aware of the fact, but it is a 
sure thing they are only hurting them- 
selves as well as hurting the radio in- 
dustry as a whole. Less and less re- 
ceiving sets are being sold and we 
know for a positive fact of several con- 
cerns who are waiting for Congress to 
act before they spend money on adver- 
tising over the air. and who can blame 
them? That being the case, there must 
be a great number throughout the en- 
tire country who are doing the same 
thing. 

You who own receiving sets are only- 
kidding yourselves when you think you 
are getting excellent reception. You 
may convince a non-set owner that 
you are, until he bears your set. but 
there are very few sets around the bay 
district which will eliminate all the 
squawks and whistles. 

During the 1)X period, time was 
when we could play with the old set 
and derive a little pleasure from it. but 
apparently those days are gone for- 
ever. On trying for distance the first is 



generally KFI just for a test of effi- 
ciency, and we then try to reach out, 
but much to our disgust we run into 
KQW, an old offender who has always 
refused to co-operate with the listen- 
ing public and get off the air during 
the DX period. We now learn that 
that particular station is being used for 
personal advertisement. May a law be 
passed putting such stations off the air 
permanently ! 

We then try to separate a couple of 
distant stations, but from all indica- 
tions broadcast stations have decided 
to go on the different wave lengths in 
pairs. After much twisting of dials, we 
do manage to separate two station.-, 
and at about ten minutes to eight an- 
other pirate, butting in locally, turn- 
on its power and we are through for 
the evening, the total log being per- 
haps two or three stations. 

At eight p. m. the locals come on the 
air 100 strong, with all sorts of pro- 
grams, and if one station should have 
a good program of classical music it is 
utterly ruined with a background of 
some aspiring and perspiring young 
lady butchering a blue song. Then if 
we decide on a dance program, it is 
faintly accompanied with the sweet, 
melodious voice of some minister giv- 
ing his message to the world. We are 
curious to know how a minister would 
feel if he knew his message was being 
delivered to the obligate) of a jazz band. 
Possibly he would hesitate to broad- 
cast, for undoubtedly his message is 
not accomplishing its purpose. 

Selectivity is a wonderful asset in a 
receiving set, and it may be obtained 
by expert tuning on good receiving 
sets. In some instances it may be had 
with certain attachments, but in a con- 
gested area it is almost an impossibil- 
ity. If one can cut through local, what 
good does it do? If a distant station is 
brought in. it is accompanied with the 
carrier wave of another station which 
ruins reception. 

All the pirates are merely claiming 
"squatter rights," to harass and annoy 
listeners who want good programs and 
want them without interference. The 
listener wants radio controlled and 
doesn't care whether it is regulated by 
the President or by a special committee 
as long as it is controlled, and about 
sixty percent of the present broadcast- 
ing stations are regulated off the air. 
They serve no useful purpose and are 
(Continued on Page 14) 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE— SAN FRAN- 
CISCO— 270.1 

Sandfly, February IS 

5:00 C" 6:00 p. m. — "Twilight Recital. 

6 : oo '" 6:06 p. m. — Stage & Screen. 

6:30 in 8:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Concert 

1 1 chesti ;i. 
Monday, February 1-1 
10:00 i" 11:00 a. m. — Concert. 
n :<n> (,i 11:30 a. ni. — Household Hints. 
ii 30 a. m. to 1 li : •) < ) p. m. — Studio program. | 
12:00 io 2:00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Hotel 

Concert 

mi to 5:30 p. in. — Eddie Harkness' Dance 

i 1 1 ii. st ra. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — Mac and tils Clang:. 
ooiii t,i 6:25 p- m. — .In Mendel's i'ep Band. 
6:25 to i;::Sf> p. m. — Stage and Screen. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Yale Radio Mattery Trio. 

7 to 7:30 p. iii. — KFRC Hawalians. 

B in 9:00 p. in. — Blue Monday Jamboree. 

9:00 in in. i"i p. m. — <: lrich Silvertown Cord 

' irehestra. 

lllllHi to 12:00 p. in. — Mark Hopkins Until 

1 lance I irehestra, 
TneNday, February I-' 

10:00 tn 11:00 a. in. — Concert. 

lliiio to 11:20 a. m. — linings of Dorothy. 

11:20 t" 11:30 a. m. — Talk tn "Women Who 
I hvest." 

11:30 a. m.to 12:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

12: 2:00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Concert 

Orchestra. 
1:00 to 5:30 p. in. — Mark Hopkins Concert 

i ii chesi i a. 
5:30 to 6:25 p. m. — Mac ami his Gang. 

6:26 to 6:30 p. m. — Stag, anil Screen. 

fi;30 In 7:00 p. in. — Yale Trio. 

7:1111 to 7::n p. in. — Russell Colvln Trio. 

B:00 tn 8:30 p. in. — KFRC Radio Movie Club. 

I ::n in 9:30 p. m. — Program. 

9:30 m 12:00 p. in — Mark Hopkins Dance Or- 

cbestt a. 
WedneHday, February 111 
111:011 to 11:00 ii. in. — Concert. 
11:110 tn 11:30 a. 111. — II. his, hull I Hints. 

II :ai a. in. t,, 12:00 p. in. — Studio program. 
12:00 t" 2:00 p. in. — Mark Hopkins Concert 

i Irehestra. 
1:00 o, 5:30 p. ni. — Mark Hopkins Concert Or- 

chesl i a. 
a::{0 to 6:25 p. m. — -Mar and his Hang. 
6 :25 in « « : : : » » p. m -Si age and Screen. 
6 30 tn 7:00 p. m. — Yale Trio. 

7:0n to , ::in p. ni. — Dona I Oreh.stra. 

8:00 tn liniiii p. in. — Grand Opera "Migimn." 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance 

i irehestra. 
Thursday, February 17 
10:00 to ii:oo a. tn. — Concert. 
11:00 tn 11:20 a. m. — Doings of Dorothy. 
11:20 i" 12:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
12:00 tn 2:Oo p. in. — Mark Hopkins Concerl 

I irehestra. 
1:00 in 5:30 p. in. — Mark Hopkins Concert 

• h chesti a. 

$0 in 0:2.", p. ni. — Mae and his c.ang. 

■■ 25 i,, 6:30 p in. — Stage and Screen. 

6:30 tn 7:00 p. m.— Yale I irehestra. 

7:on tn 7::ai p. in. — Program. 

f :"" to nam p. m. — Program. 

9:00 to loam p. m. — Program. 

10:00 in 12 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Dance or- 
chestra. 

Friday, February 18 

10:00 to 11 :00 a. in. — emu .a I 

11:00 t,, 11:20 a. in. — Advice in Home-Makers 

ll:2n to 11:30 a. ni. — "A chat with Victor." 

11:20 I.. 12:00 p. ni — Studio program. 

12:iMl Io 2:00 p. ill.— Mark II,,,, kins Concert 

i irehestra. 
lam to 5:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Orchestra, 
5:30 to 6:25 p. m. — Mac and his Hang. 
6:25 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage ami Screen. 
6:30 to 7:iin p. m. — Vale Trio. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. ni. — Studio program 
8:00 io 10:oo p. m.— KFRC " 

i irehestra. 
10 "0 i,, m. to 1 :lm a. m. — Mi 

I Irehestra. 

Saturday, February III 

i a to 1 1 a. in. — ' Concert. 

1 1 i" 12 p. ni.- studio program. 

12:00 to 2:00 p. in. Concerl Orchestra. 

I ■'<" 1" 5:30 ii. m — Mark Hopkins D; i >r- 

chestra. 

5:30 tn 6:26 P. 111. — Mae ami his Hang, 
0:25 tn 6:30 p. in. — Stage and Sen on. 
0:20 In i :00 p. ill. — Vale Trio 



Little Si mi i in i ny 
rk Hopkins Dance 






ibruary 12, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



:00 to 7:30 p, m. — Studio program. 
nil p. m. to 1:00 a. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance 
I ii chestra. 



KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 

landny. February l'A 

:4 5 to 10:45 a. m. — Undenominational and 
nun-sectarian church service. 

0:45 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

:40 to 4:15 p. m. — Concert of the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Alfred Hertz, broadcast from the 
new Curran Theatre, by KPO, KGO ami 
KFI. 
;:00 to 6:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

30 p. m. — General information. 
35 to 8:35 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 
;:;.". to 10:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert 
Orchestra. 

1:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Monday. February 14 

i:45, 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — 1 iealth Exercises. 

.0:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 
6:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 
2:00 noon — Time s'mua Is, Scripture reading". 
:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
i )rchesti a. 

: :::m to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

i:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 
15 to 6:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

»:30 to 7:00 p, m, — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

00 to 7:30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
i ►rchestra, 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

800 i" 8:10 p. m, -Chamber of Commerce talk. 

8:ln to 8:25 p. m. — Hook reviews. 

HE to 9:00 p, in. — Bridge Lesson No, 17. 

1:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Studio program. 

i(i:i)i) to Html p. m- — Billy Long's Cablrians. 

n :imi to 12:00 p. m, — KPO Variety Hour. 

Kuenduy , February I." 

6:ir., 7:15, 7:4E a. m. — Health Exercises 

10:30 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

111:45 a. m. — • Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Conceri 
i >rchestra, 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chesl ra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

filB to >'■ 30 p. in. — Stuck market quotations, 

i;.::n to 7:00 p m States Restaurant i U i 
tra. 

7 in) to 7:80 p. m. — ■ Fairmont ii<>t.i Orchestra, 

7 SO to 8 00 p, in DX. 

B00 i" 9:00 p. in - i'.i:i Waldrop Hour." 

!i:iin in 1 0:00 p hi -B\ udlo program 

10 on to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. ni, — John Wolohan am 

( 'a I Iforn ia ns. 

\\ I'lliMNiiay. February H 

I |g, , i B, 7 LG i m. — Health Exei i 

i p go .i m w . at hi i i oi ecasl , 

in: 16 a. m.- -Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

i mm to " 00 p m Fall mont Hotel Conceri 
i (rchestra. 

■ p m —Palace Hotel Conceri Of 
i ■ i i i ■- i i . i 

5 :ui to 6:16 p. m.— Children's hour 

e16 to P:30 p. m — Stock market quotations, 

B;30 to 7:00 p. m, — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

7:30 p m Fairmont Hotel Conceri 
i Irene at ra, 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.- DX 

9:00 p. m. — A. t water Kent Artists. 

|;00 \<> il 00 p m I 'n igram of the Colli ■-. 
the Pacifii 

: ■ ■ .mi. 

in -States Rests 
chestra. 

li:Oi . to 12:00 p, m. — Billy Long" a ■ 

ThurHilay. I-Vlirunrj IT 

•n — i Iealth Exei 
10:30 n. m.— Weather forecast. 

in t.". a. in.- I ntS and I - 

[1:00 noon-— Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

i 8;00 p ni —Fairmont Hoti 

■ 

chestra. 

Children's I 

eh mark.! 

estaurant • '• 

tva 

air mont H" 
< >rchi 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 



8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program of the College of 
the Pacific. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 1^:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Friday. February IS 

6:45, 7:15. 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:35 a. m. — Fashion Talk. 

10:45 a. m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing-. 

12:15 p. m. — Talk from Commonwealth Club. 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Conceit 
Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

Ii:15 to 0:30 p. m — Stock ma ket quotations 

6:30 to 7:20 p. m. — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:20 to 7:30 p. m. — "Sports on the air." 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
chestra. 

10 DO to 11:00 p. m. — States Restaurant Or- 
chestra. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his 
Californians. 

Sa I urtl ii y . Fetor unry 1 !l 

0:45. 7:15, 7:45 a. m. — Health Exercises. 

10:30 a. m. — U. S. weather forecast. 

10:45 a. m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12:00 noon — Time signals and Scripture read- 
ing. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert 
i ii chestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Or- 
chesl r;i. 

6:16 to 0:30 p. m. — Stock market quotations, 

6 30 to 7:30 p. m.- — States Restaurant Orches- 
tra. 

7:^.0 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 i" B:00 p. m. — Simultaneous broadcast 
by KPi ' and KFI. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra, 

io:oii to 1:00 a in. — Walter Krausgrill's Or- 
ehesl i a 

:i mi to 11:00 p. m. — Intermission by Maurice 
Gunskj . 

KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS CO., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 220 
iiniiv Except Sunday 

9:00 to i i 80 ' 

Si lecl Ions. 

2:00 to i 

■ • Ions 
Frldaj i- m. to 11:00 p. m. — 

"The Happiness Boys" and Studio Pro 

1 1 00 p. m to i SI udlo Pi i 

I in \\ [Hard Power Units." 



-Vocal and Instrumental 
i — Vocal and Instrumental 



KGTT— GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

gnndaj . IVhriinr* 

10 p, in. 

■ ■ 

J(l mi p tr 
llondaj l>l*rinir> 
1 00 p 



IS 

-Sunday Bchool 
-Tempi* 

Even i ii k service 
1 1 
-Dally Scripture reading. 



Tu«Mlaj Pebraarj IB 

p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
■ : am, 
\\ «-<!»« nday< February l€ 

in.— Daily Scripture reading 
to | "i» p m Divine healing service. 

Tharnda) Pearaarj '" 

Si rlpture reading;. 
i , i . v i V to mar j 18 

. \ .in ,, m.— Daily Scripture r.-ading. 
pram 
shine hour. 
Sntarday, Pearaarj IS 

p mi 1 - ure reading. 



KYA— PACIFIC BROADCOASTING CORP. 
SAN FRANCISCO— 399.8 

Raaaay, Pearaarj IS 

..( Central Methodist 
Church, Located .it Leavenworth 
- . • Dr Walter John 
will dellvi 

i Methodist 
. h f 'r rl 

Hob da J Fraraarj i t 

i — I'lifr II • Trio 

- 

Tri" 

n the 

_ - 

E 

Ernie 
lortne 




Sunset Way 
East 

• • scenic route through the southland 

East by way of Apache Trail, El 
Paso, and Juarez, historic San An- 
tonio, to New Orleans, colorful 
metropolis of the south. See the 
great Mardi Gras. 

Now travel east aboard world- 
famous Sunset Limited. Equip- 
ped and manned to delight the 
mostdiscriminating.Observation 
and club cars, Pullman comfort, 
Southern Pacific dining car service. 
Maid,barber,va!et;shower-baths. 

Sunset Limited leaves here daily 
at 6:15 p. m. Tourist sleeper to 
Washington, D. C. over Sunset 
route; leaves 9:00 p.m. 

Also the Argonaut daily Los 
Angeles to New Orleans. Leave 
here 9:00 p.m. for connection. 

Southern 
Pacific 

Phone Dai-enport 4000 for all offices 

Ferry Building 65 Geary St. 

Third Street Station 

Oakland 

Phone Lakeside 1420 for information 

bureau and all offices 

I3th and Broadway 16th St. Station 

Island Broadway Station 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1927 



Radio Program for Next Week 



10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. (Herb Meyerinck >. 

Tuesday, February 1!> 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(Sollie Heiibronner). 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(Sollie Heiibronner). 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Silent for DX Fans. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. (Herb Meyerinck). 

Wednesday, February Hi 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio, 
i S( Hie Heiibronner). 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(Sol lit) Heiibronner). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program in the main 
studio of KYA, presenting Thomas and 
Kathleen Do wrick, Tenor and Pianist; 
Klizabeth Orchard, Violinist; Louis Donato, 
Tenor, and Elsie Campbell, accompanist. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — The Emydian Choir Un- 
der the Direction of Grant Austin. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. (Herb Meyerinck). 

Thursday, February 17 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(Sollio Heiibronner). 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(Sollio Heiibronner). 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Silent for DX Fans. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. (Herb Meyerinck ). 

Friday, February 1W 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(SolliO Heiibronner). 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
(Sollie Heiibronner). 

S:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program by the Califor- 
nia Grays, Under the direction of C. A. 
Baker. Intermission Solos by Benny Lips- 
ton, Lyric Tenor and James Muir, Musical 
Saw. Leroy Henshaw will accompanv. 

Hi:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. (Herb Meyerinck). 

Saturday. February lit 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Sollie Heiibronner and 
the Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio 
(Sollie Heiibronner). 

X:00 to 10:00 p. m. — .Silent for DX Fans. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Or- 
chestra. (Herb Meyerinck), 



KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS, INC., 

SAN FRANCISCO— 250 
Sunday. February IS 

1:00 to 2:30 p. m. — William Bennett recital. 

3:00 to 4:15 p. m. — Broadcast from Civic 
Auditorium. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

« :.~.n to 9:00 p. m. — Services broadcast from 
Fifth Church of Chvjst Scientist. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

Monday, February 14 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Paul's Hawaiian Orchestra. 

S:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Studio piogram. 

9:00 to 11 : On p. m. — Dance program. Paul 
Kelli's Orchestra. 

Tuesday, February lii 

6:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Jack Curtis Band. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Panatmpe Concert. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m.-— Gaylord Wilshire, health 
lecture. 

9:ini to 10:00 p. m. — Ellis Wise and his Or- 
chestra. 

Wednesday, February le 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m . — Studio Orchestra. 

8:00 to 8:20 p. m.— Billy Devine and Clem 
Kennedy. 

8:20 to S:30 p. m. — Becker Storage, tenor. 

*-" I" 9:00 ]). m. — Thompson and Howard 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — San Francisco Police De- 
partment. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Paul Kelli's orchestra. 

Thursday. February 17 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Al Pierce and Walter 
Smith. 

R:00 to 9:00 p. m . — Studio program. 

9:00 t.» licoo p. m. — Maxwell House Coffee 
Program, 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Paul Kelli's Orchestra 

Friday, February 18 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m . — Studio program. 

8:00 to 8:30 p. m . — Panatmpe Concert. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Health Lecture. Gaylord 
Wilshire. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Studio program. 

Saturday. February 10 

-"" to 3:00 a. m. — Broadcast from Civic 
Auditorium. 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., 
OAKLAND— 361 
Sunday, February 13 

11:00 a. m. — Calvary Presbyterian Church 

Service. 

2:10 p. in. — San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra concert, direction of Alfred Hertz. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — .Bern's Little Symphony 
< >i chestra. 

7:30 p. m. — Weather bureau report. 

7:35 p. m. — First Congregational Church serv- 
ice, Oakland. 



9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Bern's Little Sym phoni- 
cs */chestra. 

Monday, February 14 

11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Concert. 

12:00 i»- ni. — Weather Bureau report. 

i:3u p. in. — iV i. tot.ocK rep or la. 

1:37 p. rn. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

4:00 to o:00 p. m. — California Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies' Kink 

o;uo to 6:55 p. ni. — Bern's Little Sympiiony. 

0:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 
Mutals. 

7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 

7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 

Tuesday. February 15 

11:30 a. m. to l:oi) p. m. — Concert. 

1 2:oii noon. — Time signal. 

12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 

5:30 p. m. — "Mental Measurements." 

b:uo io u:55 p. m. — Bern s Lituie symphony, 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

£:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

( :06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — (Oakland Studio) "The 

Pilgrims." 
9:00 p. m. — "Chats About New Books." 

9:20 p. m. — Surprise broadcast. 

Wednesday, February io 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Concert. 
12:00 noon. — Time signal. 
12:30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 
1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports. 
1:42 p. m. — Weather Bureau reports. 
5:30 p. m. — "For instance," by General Jack- 
son. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
t:55 p. m. — News items. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

>:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:11 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stock reports (closing). 
8:00 p. m. — Oakland Real Estate Board Ban- 

q mt program. 
Thursday. February 1" 
10:4(i a. m. — Class room Instruction, Oakland 

Public .Schools. 
11:30 a. m. to 1:00 p. m. — Concert. 
12:00 noon — Time signal. 
12:30 o. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 
1:37 p. m. — S. F. Stocks. 
1:42 p, m. — Weather. 
5:00 to 6:00 p. m. — George W. Ludlow, "Friend 

to Boys." 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little .Symphony. 
6 :55 p. m. — News. 
7:03 p. m. — Weather. 
7:06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks (closing). 
7:21 p. m. — S. F. Stocks (closing). 
8:00 to o:iio p. m. — (Oakland Studio) — "Gems 
from light opera under direction of Paul 
Steindorff. 
9:00 lo 12:iM) p. m. — John Philpott's Midship- 
men. 

Friday, February IS 

1 1 .:••>' to i :ii" p. m. — Concert 

12:00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p. in. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports. 

1:37 p. m. — S. V. Stock reports. 

1:42 p. ni. — Weather Bureau reports. 

fi:00 to f,:. r »5 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6:55 p. m. — News items. 

7:03 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7.06 p. m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, and 

Metals. 
7:14 p. m. — N. Y. Stock reports (closing). 
721 p m. — S. F. Stor-k rppo--ts (rinsing). 
8:00 to 9:00 p.m.— (Oakland Studio) An hour 

of Operatic Selections. 
Saturday. February li> 
1 1 :30 io i ;00 p. m. — Concert. 
12:00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p. m. — XT. S. Weather Bureau report. 
P:00 p. m. — "Weekly sport Review." 
8:15 in 9:15 p. m. — Program. 

9:15 to 1:00 a. m. — Dance Music. 



7.00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8;oo to 9:00 p. m. — Educational Program. 

!i :iiii to It) ;iin p. in. — Community night. 

Thursday February 17 

7:oo to 7:30 P- m- — News broadcast. 

Filoay* February IN 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
.'. :iio to 9:00 p. m. — Program. 
9:45 to in:;jo p. m. — Athens Athletic Club or- 
chestra, 
Saturday. Febi nary IV 
7:uu to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 



KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, OAK- 
LAND— 509 
Monday, February 14 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News Broadcast. 

8:00 (o 9:00 p. m. — Special program, courtesy 
of Builders Palaee Exhibit. 

9 on to 10:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting Lake 
M>-"-itt rnioks. 

Tuesday. February 1I> 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

Wednesday. February If! 

6:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Athens Athletic club or- 
chestra. 



KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 
Sunday, February lit 

y.^u a., in. — international Sunday School Les- 
son. 

l i :iiu to 12:00 noon — Elmhurst full Gospel 

Church Services. 
i :45 to 9: on jj. m. — Even ing service of Elm- 
hurst Pull t rospel church. 

Honday, February 14 

lo:uo a. m. — The Hour of Christian Ministry. 

Tuesday. February 15 

1:00 to 5:00 p. m. — Sacred Variety program. 

\\ i-dni sdny. February Ifi 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 

8:00 p. m. — Saci ed songs. 

Friday. February IK 

10:00 a. m. — The hour of Christian ministry. 

2:00 to 3:0o p. m.— Woman's Bible Study 
hour. 

S:00 p. m. — Telephone or write in your health 
questions and they will be informally dis- 
cussed. 



Jollow the 
Qolden c R^ad 



! 



to Health I 



Tune in on KPO every 
morning at 6:45 - 7:15 or 
7:45 for the daily Golden 
Road to Health Exercises. 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of quality 
in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 




•Vl.ruarv 12, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO MAYS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



13 



iaturdny, February in 

..n lu z.'6\) p. in. — Children's Church Broad- 
cast. 

::n to 7:30 p. m. — (a) Gospel Weather Bureau 
i'Yn ecast; (b) Announcements of Churches 
for tsunday. 



Gold 



KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 

OAKLAND— 302.8 
anday, February i:> 

:}.". to 10:45 a. m. — Prof. F,. C. Linsley's Bible 
Class. 

1:00 a. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 

:15 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist 

Church. 
luuday. February 14 

■ib lo ti:15 a. in. — "ihe Hour of Prayer." 

15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

U0 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 

30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

00 to 10:00 p. m. — Valentine Program. 

ueNday. February lo 

*a lu a:lo a. in.- — "ine Hour of Prayer." 

15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 

45 to 10:00 a. m. — '"Diet and Health." 

00 to 6;ou p. m. — Children's Hour. 

30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 

00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 

00 to 8:15 p. m. — Fifteen Minutes with the 

Stamp Collectors. 

BE to 10:00 p. m, — The KTAB Quartet. 
Vrilm siliiy. February Hi 

to a:lb a. m. — 'The Hour of Prayer." 
:16 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
:00 to 6:00 p. m.— Children's Hour. 
:30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
:00 i" 10:00 p. m. — Studio Program. 
Illirsriny. February 17 

45 to 9:15 a. m. — The Hour of Prayer." 
15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's Hour. 
30 to 7:00 p. m. — Twilight Hour. 
00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
'riclay, February IN 

:45 to 9;15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer.*' 
15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour. 
00 to 6:00 p. m.— ChlMr.-irs Hour, 
mi to 6:20 p. m. — Twenty minutes with Dr. 
Thompson. 

00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 
;im tn 9:00 p. m. — Program. Goat Island 
Boats. 
ai unlay, February in 
45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping Hour 
00 to 7:30 p. m. — Shopping Hour. 



[RE— DAILY GAZETTE, BERKELEY— 256 
li ml ii y, February i:t 

0:00 in 11:00 a. in.— Church Service. 

flg to 7:30 p. m.- — Dinner Concert, 

:16 to 9:00 p. m. — Social concert. 

(outlay, February 14 

1:15 a. in. — -Physical exercises Cor women. 

;30 p. in. — Curren i n< \\ 

mi io [0:00 p. m. — Studio program. 
uesiliiy. February in 

1:15 a. m. — Physical exercises for women. 
:30 p. in. — Current new a 

:00 to 10:00 p, in— St mlio program, 
i eilm sdiiy. February Ml 
1:16 a. m. — Physlca i exercises toi women 
SO p, m.— Currenl news, 
Iiiiis<Iii>. February IT 

1:15 n. in. — Physical exercises for women. 
H p, m, — Current m w a 
oo to li):iio p, m. — Studio proi 
rliin>, February is 

BE a, rn - Physical exercises for women 
30 p, m. — Current n. ■ w a 
on to 12:00 p, m.— nance program, 

i1nrila>. February 111 

.if> a, m. — Physical exerclsi s for woman. 

so p. ni— cun-'Mit news, 

<h> p. m, to 1:00 a. m. Dance program, 



KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES — 467 
Copyright 1925 by Earle C Anthony. inc.) 
lining. February i:t 
1:00 ii. m. — Morning services, under d 

f ,os Angeles Church Fedei a 
IB p in, —San Fra noli co S> n pli ■ ■ 
ti.i. direction of Alfred llertx, presented by 
the Standard Oil <'ompat)\ 

ileasi simultaneous^ l.\ KFI, KPO and 
KGO 

00 p. m--\\,,i, i\ program of classical and 
Bemlclassfcal music, h> I In - 

tnj mi Musi Including i 

My runoff. Piano: Miseha Speigel \ 
fcnd Alexamh r Borrlsoff, i '■ 
D p. m. — Aeolian 
Fellly at the console 
D p. m -Packard Classic Hour 

mi —Boh Hotiy, an d 
: ■ 

WO p, m —-(Packard Six < >rcn< - 
•mlnj . February i * 

,. 10:40 a. m— Furnishings for ihe 
Borne talk. i.\ Ag-n. - White, 



presenting 
Bros. 



10 -j to 11:00 a. m.— Betty Crocker 

Medal Klour limn,. Sei Vice Tail;-. 
11.10 to 11:30 a. m.— Food Talks by Agnes 

White. 
6:30 p. m. — Virgil Ray's Winter Garden Or- 
chestra. 
6:15 p, m. — Radiotorial. 

6;:;u n. ni. — Ted Douglas. Maritime, Dorothy 

McKerral, Mezzo-Soprano. Mrs. w. English, 

accompanist. 

[:00 p. m. — Owen Fallon and his Californians. 

8:00 p. m. — Classic song recital by Gilda Mar- 

chetti, soprano. 
9:00 p. m. — Louise Klos Trio in a classic pro- 
gram including trio in F Minor l»v Ober- 
thin. 
10:00 p. m. — Weekly program, 
vaudeville artists by Meiklejohn 
Tuesday, February 15 
5:30 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaii an s 
6:15 p. ni. — Radiotorial Period, 
6:30 p. m. — Edna Belea. contralto. 
7:00 p. m. — Clark .Sisters (Ruth & Lilah) 

duets. 
S:00 p. m. — All Schubert Song Recital by Vir- 
ginia Flohri and Robert Hurd, with Lilyan 
Ariel, accompanist. 
9:00 p. m. — Gat tone String Quartet, Emma 

Kimmel, soprano. 
10:00 p. m. — Azure Music Club, Glen Edmunds 
and his Collegians. Dance Orchestra. Edna 
' 'ook, blues singer. 
Wednesday, February 1C 
10:20 to 10:40 a. m.— Talk on Child Training 

by Agnes While. 
10:40 to 11:00 a. m.— Betty Crocker, Gold 

Medal Flour Home Service Talks. 
11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food Talks by Agnes 

White. 
6:30 p. m. — Jack Murray's Italian Village Or- 

chestra. 
6:1 :. |i. tn. — Radiotorial. 
6:80 p. m. — Vest pocket period. 

7:00 p. m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians. 
7:30 p. m. — Nick Harris, Detective Stories; 
r:45 p. m, — Win. McDougall, Scotch comedian. 

8:00 p, in. — Pryor Mo,. re, director of the Cal- 
pet Orchestra, with Alma Prances Gordon 
contralto. Presented by the California 
Petroleum < Corporation, 

9:00 p. m.— Song recital by Maud Darling 

\\ eaver, conl ralto. 

L0:00 p. in. — Program by the Sunsel Instru- 
mental Quartet, with Dorothy Ruth Miller, 
concerl pianist, and singers. 

i'liiirsiiny, February 17 

6:30 p. m,— Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra 

i: ■ l.i p. m.— Radiotorial. 

6:30 p. m. — Sebastian's Nighl Club Orches- 
tra. 
p. m. — Program by University of South- 

• M I I ' ; I i j 1 | I , 

00 p in K i'i i ii ama Hour, 

00 p m. — Varied program. 

" P m Johnston ft Farrell's Music Box 

Hour. 
i i i lay. February IS 

to 10:40 a m.- Talk on home maim gi 
■ ba Agnes Whlti 
i" 10 to ii 00 a ni — Betty Crocker. Gold 
Medal Flour Home Sen Ice Talks 

I ■■■! i'. i Iks by Agnes White. 
■ m.— Henry Starr, pianist and vocj 
p. m . — K l-'t Radiotorial Pel 
>. m. — Program arranged by Lou Parker, 
ran Paul Roberts e nd 

die Idams, popular .-onus and ballads. 
i m. — Aeolian organ Recital — Alex Kali 

1 V ; , ■ I i ■ 

9 no p. m. — Alma Frances Qordon, contralto. 

id Hour. 
Saturday, February in 

tn p. m.— Mosby's Hot Five Dance Orches- 
tra, 

p m. — Radiotorial P« rlod. 

m.— Billy Cox and his Angeleno Ag- 
gi ,i\ ators i 

m.— Felipe 1 letgado. Media Hora Es- 
panola 

in I '.i and I Ipei . with Vir- 

ginia Flohi i. Roberl ii urd, Bell Or- 

- Soap 
Compa ny. Broi by 

KFI and Kf. I 

am, popular ar- 

m. — Packard Radio Club. 
m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 



:15 

t; 



l.e 



KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES — 337 

Dally Kxreul Siiniho 

B in — Insp | rational talk and morning 

B i er. 
v a. m. — Time Signals. 

■ ■_ 
tsehold i " 

- 

Book Worm. 

Found column, 
m — Market reports 
m — i >rlhophonl< 

■' clustra. 



6:30 p. m, — Dinner Hour Concert. 
Sunday, February 13 

lu;uu it. m. — Isl Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
ly \\ ood. 

2:00 to 4:iio p. m. — Musical program. 

5:15 p. m.— Wilshire All-Souls Church. 

6:30 p. m. — First Unitarian Church. 

7;UU p. m. — 1ml JbVesuy terian ChUiCn of Holly- 
u ood. 

8:00 p. m. — Concert Orchestra, 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program, 

31 outlay. February 14 

3:0U p. in. — First Presbyterian Church of Hol- 
lywood. 

7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

7:3(J p. m.— Piaylet. 

S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Courtesy prom-am. 

10:00 p. m. — KNX Feature program. 

ii:im p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Tuesday, February 1 ." 

3:uu p. m. — Combined program by Police and 

Fire Depts. 
4:00 p. m. — Radio matinee. 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
S:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 
Wedm sdny. February IV 
7:00 p. m. — Courtesy program, 
7:30 p. m. — Feature program. 
S:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
10:00 p. m. — Feature pi ogram. 
11:00 ]>■ m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 
Thursday. February 17 
11:00 a. m. — Nature talk. 
T:iia p. m. — Organ recital. 
8:00 p. ni. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Feature program. 
10:00 p. m.— Feature program, 
11:00 p. m. — Gus Ainheim's Orchestra. 
Friday , February is 
3:00 p. m. — Musical program. 
4:00 p. m. — Boy Scouts' Musical Program, 
i :00 p. m— Feature program. 
S:00 p. tn. — Feature program. 
9:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m. — Feature pi ogram. 
11:iiii p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 
Saturday, February 19 
3:00 p. m. — The Town Crier of the Day, and 

h is pa Is, 
7:00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 
7 i B p. m. — Announcement of Sunday ser- 

vlces r»f Hi- leading Los Angeles churches. 
,:::n p. in. — Feature program. 
B tin j. ni.- — Feature program. 
1 00 i 1 m ^Feature program. 
10:00 p in - -Gus \ Mih. i m's Orchestra. 
11:00 p. m. — KNX Frolic from the main studio. 



KFWB— WARNER BROS., HOLLY- 
WOOD— 252 

Honda) Februarj IS 

8:00 t.. :: 00 p. m. — Organ recital 

• mi p iii. — Program 
8:00 to 10 30 p. m. — The Tlplca Orchestra of 

Mi xlco City. 
Meadaj Februarj t t 
12 30 to i 30 p. ni. — Classified Hour. 

, , g io p m — < Children's n , 

5:40 tn S:00 p. m, — "Psychology of Beauty." 
90 p. in. — ['inner Hour i lonci rl 

ogram featuring con- 
fi i orchestra and soli 

o 8 10 p in. — Daily News Items. 
>:in to 9:00 p. i Cole, popular 

9:00 i" 9 50 p m. — Warner Bros Eur 
Novelty i 

i • p m. — Dally N-ws items. 

10:00 to ii DO p. m.— The Rainbow Orchestra. 
11:00 to 12 "»• p. m. — Henry Hal stead and his 

Orchi 
Taetidaj ' 'ebraary i" 

m.— Classlfled Hoi 
p. m. — Dr. I. T. Clark on "Diet." 
p m —* "h lldren's Hnur. 

5:40 to »■ p. m. — "Psychology of Beauty." 

; ".. p m .__Dli nei Hour ConcerL 
p m. — Program, 
p m — W • ircbestra. 

WS Items. 
p. m — Kenneth Gillum, popular 

S"UffS 

Trio. 
p, m. — Dally News h 
:; — The Ra i 
>0 p. m. — Henry Ha I stead and his 

Mol Iiv rrbrunn U 

U'. ur. 
, — < 'h lldren's Hour, 
p, m — "Pa; uty." 

m. — Dinner Hou 
p. m. — Thirty minutes «f sun- 
shine. 

p, ra. — Warner 
!• m. — I 'ailv News Items 
p. m. — Byrh 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1927 



Radio Program for Next Week 



9-00 to 9:50 p. m.— < The Junior Symphony. 
9:50 to 10:00 p m — Daily News Items 
1000 to 11:00 p. m.— The Rainbow Orchestra. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Henry Halstead and his 

Orchestra. 
Thursday, February 17 
12-30 to 1:30 p. m. — Classified Hour. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — "Psychology of Beauty. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. ni. — Program. 
7-30 to 7:50 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 
7:50 to S:00 p. m. — Daily News Items. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. in. — Frances St. George, blues 

songs. n 

9:00 to 9:50 p. m, — Warner Bros. ' oncert 

Orchestra. 
9:50 to 10:00 p. m. — Daily News Items. 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — The Rainbow Orchestra. 
11:0(1 to 12:00 p. m. — Henry Halstead and his 

Orchestra. 

Friday, February IS 

12:30 to l:3li p. m. — Classified Hour. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — "Psychology of Beauty," 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Warner Urns, orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Dance orchestra and solo- 

ist. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. ni. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 
9:00 to 9:50 p. m. — Melody Makers Hour. 
9:50 to 10:00 p. m. — Dailv News [tems, 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — The Rainbow Orchestra. 
11:00 to 12:1)0 p. m. — Henry Halstead and 

his Orchestra. 
Saturday, February 1!> 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Classified Hour. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m. — "Psychology of Beauty." 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner Hour Concert. 
7:00 to 8:00 p. m. — Melody Makers. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio 
10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — The Rainbow Orchestra. 
11:00 to 12:iiii p. m. — Henry Halstead and 

his Orchestra. 



7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Weather report. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 



metals: N. Y. 



KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 

— 322.4 — (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. February 13 

10:50 a. m. — Church Service. 
6:30 p. m. — Organ recital. 
7:50 p. in — Church Service. 

Monday, February 14 

11:45 a. m. — Weather. 

11:48 a. in— N. V, St. irks. 

11-55 a. m. — Chicago gram 

Cotton 
11:58 a. 
12:00 p. 
12:»ii p. 
12:04 p. 
12:15 p. ni 
6:00 p. rr 
6:08 i'. 

Cotton 
6:13 p. n 
6:20 p. l 
6:30 p. i 
7::tli p. r 
8:lill p. 



Livestock; produce. 
■Time signal. 
Livestock; produce. 
\v. ather. 
i irgan recital. 

— ft. Y. stocks. 

111. — Chicago grain: metals 
, — Livestock; produce. 

n. — News bulletins. 
ii. — Dinner concert. 
ii. — Children's hour. 

-Instrumental program. 



Y. 



KGW— MORNING OREGONIAN. PORT- 
LAND — 491.5 

Sunday, February 13 

10:55 to 12:30 p. m. — Morning services. 

4:00 to 6:00 p. m.— KGW Salon Orchestra. 

6:00 to 7:311 p. m. — Concert Orchestra. 

7:30 to 9:00 p. m. — Evening services. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 

Monday, February 14 

7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. ni. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's Program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Tuesday, February 1." 
9:45 to 10:00 a. ni. — .Women's Health Exe 

cises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Educational program 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — Dance music. 
Wednesday, February 1<5 
7:15 a. m. — Setting up exercises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report. 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:15 p. m. — Utility service. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Albers Poultry School. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Concert. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Concert. 
Thursday. February 17 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report, 1 

household helps. 
12:311 to 1:30 p. ni. — Noon concert. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 to 7:45 p. m. — Utility Service. 
7:45 to 8:00 p. m. — Lecture. 

.8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Vaudeville entertainment 
Friday, February IS 
7:15 a. m. — Retting up exercises. 
9:45 to 10:00 a. m. — Women's Health exer- 
cises. 
10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather report 

household helps. 
12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Noon concert. 
2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Women's Matinee. 
6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's prog*\im. 
7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — Weekly meeting of the 

KGW Movie Club. 
.8:00 to 9:00 ii. m. — Concert Orchestra. 
9:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 
10:30 in 12:imi p. m.— Weekly frolic of the II 

Keep Growing Wiser Order of Mont Owls.fl 
Saturday, February 10 u_ 

10:00 to 11:30 a. m. — Music, weather repoi-t.Tj 

household helps. Jj 

12:30 to 1:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. H 

6:00 to 7:00 p. m. — Dinner concert. \:{ 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Children's program. 



.15 ii. m. — Studio program. 
Tuesday. February ir> 

11:45 a. m. — Weather. 

11 ;48 a. in.— N. Y. Stocks. 

nr,r. a. m. — Chicago grain; metals; N. 1. 

t lotton. 
11:58 a. in. — Livestock; produce. 
12:lHt p. m. — Time signal. 
12:iiii ]). m. — Livestock; produce. 
I2:ii! p. m. — Weather. 
12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 
:::15 p. m. — Talk. 
3:20 p. m. — Matinee. 
4:30 p. m. — Oues.tion box. 
11-1:15 p. m. — Fashion review. 
16:00 p. m. — N. V. stocks. 

(S.<i:i>S p. m. — Chicago grain: metals; N. \. 
Cotton. 
6:13 ii. ni. — Livestock; produce. 
i;:20 p. m. — News bulletins. 
6:30 p. ill. — Dinner concert. 
F:30 ]i. m. — Farm question box. 
l:0ll p. m. — Auction bridge, 
w ednt-.siliiy. February 16 
11:45 a. m. — Weather. 
11:18 a. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 
ill: r, 5 a. m. — Chicago grain; metals: X. "i . 

Cotton. 

11:58 a. in. — Livestock; produce. 
12:ini p. in. — Time signal. 
12:IH) ii. m. — Livestock; produce. 
12:04 p. m. — Weather. 
12:15 p. in, — organ recital. 
6:00 p. in.— N. v. Stocks. 
6:08 ii. m. — Chicago grain: metals. X. \'. 

Cotton. 

6:13 ii. m. — Livestock; produce. 
:20 p. in. — News bulletins. 
:::n ii. m. — Dinner concert. 
:30 p. m. — Wynken, Blynken ami Nod lime. 
8:(iii p. ni. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. in. — Studio program. 
Thursday February 17 

11:15 a, in. — W'.-a Iber. 
11:18 a. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

11:55 a. in. — Chicago grain; metals; X. Y. 
Cotton. 

(Continued on Page 22) 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 

Jmerely trying to establish 



■ in 



air n 



of selling such 



>hts" 
ights 



for the purpo: 
ater mi. 

Protect our old established stations 
vho have been giving us good pro- 
grams in the past and who will con- 
i do si. in the future at a p;reat 



Itinue t 
Icost! 



From 8 p. m.. February 19th, to .^ 
in.. February 20th, KFW1 will 
broadcast the entire proceedings of the 
|_Widows and I Irphans' Aid Association 
if the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment. 

'this includes a concert orchestra. 
{police hands and dance program, with 
|intermissions broadcast from the stage 
"of the Civic Auditorium, featuring the 



popular stars of every S. F. broadcast- 
ing station and stations of the sur- 
rounding territory. 

From a complete broadcasting sta- 
tion, specially built for the occasion on 
the Civic Auditorium stage, the Mayor 
of San Francisco, Chief of Police and 
many other well known local people 
will be heard, in addition to a complete 
musical comedy and groups of local 
radii i stars. 




NEW ORLEANS 

To better serve our many friends and 
patrons over '400,000.00 lias been 
expended in reconstruction to 
maintain tins famous hostelry as 

One of Americas Leading Hotels; 

ACCOMMODATING 1000 GUESTS 

Lai$e rooms with unusually bj$h 
ceilings and $qod ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort. 
Alfred S. Aimer and Co.ad. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Send for descriptive folder Ticket Offices of 
Illustrated Mardl Gi-as- all Trdnsportdti 
Program for thi 




L_! 



S. A. LOVEJOY 

will bring 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos ! 

In your Books, 
Financial Statements, 
Income Tax Reports. 

Expert Auditor 

Part-lime Service 

268 Market St., Room 101 



CLUB 
Auto Service Co, 

Harry A. Fialer, Prop. 

Lincoln and Cadillac Limousines 
For AM Occasions 
Day and Night 

City Sightseeing - - - $3.00 per hour 

Shopping 2.50 per hour 

Short Trips, Taxicab Rates 



PROSPECT 
4000 



585 Post St. 
San Francisco 



February 12, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



15 



TRAVEL TID-BITS 

By Ernest F. Rixon 

BASTILLE, Place des Vosges, Hotel de Ville, St. der- 
mis, Notre Dame, Palais Royal, etc. Excursion to 
Malmaison and Versailles. 

ROME— The Vatican and its .Museums, the Sistine 
Chapel, the Stanza of Raphael, St. Peter's, Basilica of St. 
Paul outside-the-walls, Church of San Pietro in Yinculi, 
with the famous Moses by Michelangelo. Church of Doniine 
yuo Vadis, The Catacombs, the Basilica of St. John Later- 
al. Scala Sancta, Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore (Sing- 
in- doors of the Baptistry). The Pantheon, Roman Forum, 
Coliseum, Arch of Constantine, Appian Way, Baths of 
Caracalla; Trevi Fountain, Monument of Victor Emanuel 
II.. Temple of Vesta, Temple of Foftuna, House of Rienzi, 
the last of the Roman Tribunes, Tiberine Island, Bridge of 
Horatius and Fabricius, Pyramid of Cestius, Aurelian 
Walls. Quirinal Hill with Royal Palace, Gallery of Borg- 
hese with famous Bernini sculptures, etc. 

THE TROSSACHS— By motor via Dumbarton on the 
River Clyde, and Dumbarton Rock; Balloch on Loch Lo- 
mond: Lochearnhead on Loch Earn; Loch Lubnaig; Loch 
Katrine; the bridge of Allan; Stirling and Stirling Castle; 
Bannockburn, where Robert Bruce defeated the English in 
1314; Linlithgow. 

VENICE— "The city in the sea." Touring of the Grand 
Canal and water ways in gondolas. Si. Mark's, the Cam- 
panile, The Doge's Palace, the RialtO Bridge, and Bridge of 
Sighs. Church of the Frari, with Titian's Assumption. 

VIENNA — The charming capital of Austria. Schwartz- 
berg Palace. Cathedral University, Opera House, House of 
Parliament, Museum of Fine Arts, Imperial Theatre, Medi- 
eval fortifications, Augustine Church, Boerse, old City Hall. 
Trinity Obelisk, Hofburg, National Historical Museum, 
Sofienbridge, Lichtenstein Art Gallery, Landes Museum, 
Castle Schoenbrunn. 

WIESBADEN— Delightful watering place on the Rhine. 
The Kurhaus and Kur-Park, Royal Palace. Kochbrunnen, 
Museum. 

\\ IX DP, KM ERE -In the English Pake I listrict, so close- 
ly associated with Southey, Wordsworth and Coleridge. 
Wordsworth's Cottage, \.mbelside, Grasmere, and Keswick. 

ZURICH — Switzerland's most populous city. Swiss Na- 
tional Museum, Kunstlerhaus, Tonhalle, Gross-Munster 
founded by Charlemagne. Zwingli Monument, University, 
Swiss Polytechnical School. No city of Europe spends so 
much per capita on education as does Zurich, "The Athens 
on the Limmat." 

SEVILLE— The Giralda, once the praying tower of the 
principal mosque, is the most conspicuous ami the 
most beautiful building. The Cathedral i- unexcelled 
among the Gothic Churches in Christendom. House ol 
Pilate, Murillo's 1 1. 'use. containing many paintings by 
Spanish Masters; The Alcazar. 

OSTEND Chief resort of Fashion on the Belgian sea- 
coast; excellent beach and entertainment-: the Casino. 

MONTE CARLO Special permits for visiting the Ca- 
sino will he provided, affording an opportunity to see the 
life of this famous resort. 

\1 \DRID Beautiful capital of Spain. The Prado Pic- 
ture Gallery, containing masterpieces of Velasquez and 
jral Pal. i.e. and the unsurpassed Royal Arm- 
Plaza de Oriente. Excursion to Toledo or El Escurial. 

HEIDELBERG A quaint old university town on the 
loveh Neckar. Ruins and panorama of Heidelberg Castle; 
University building- and grounds, the oldest in Germany; 
dueling room- : Mtsta.lt : IVr Ritter. the city's most ancient 
edifice. 



GENOA — Commercial center and important sea port 
of Italy. Columbus' House and Monument. The Marble 
Palaces. Campo Santo, the great cemetery of Italy. 

LUCERNE — Most cosmopolitan of all Swiss resorts. 
The old bridges; the Kapell Bridge with 154 historical Fres- 
coes, and the Spreuer Bridge with the fascinating frescoes 
of the Dance of Death (Longfellow's Golden Legend). The 
Lion of Lucerne, hewn out of solid rock after the design of 
Thorwaldsen in memory of the Swiss who, true to their 
honor, refused capitulation and fell to the last man in de- 
fense of the Tuileries, August 10th, 1792. 

NAPLES — The National Museum, where one may see 
the matchless treasures of Herculaneum and Pompeii. The 
Cathedral and Chapel of St. Januarius, famous for the mir- 
aculous liquefaction of the blood of the Saint, occurring 
three times yearly. The Aquarium is one of the best in the 
world. Villa Nazionale and Corso Vittorio Emanuele. Ex- 
cursions to Pompeii, Amalfi, Sorrento, Capri, Blue Grotto. 

NICE — Queen city of the Riviera, and one of the world's 
foremost resorts. Promenade des Anglais and Quai du 
Midi. Russian Cathedral. Grande Corniche drive to Monte 
Carlo. 

PARIS — Opera, Madeleine, Place de la Concorde, 
Champs Elysees, Arc de Triomphe, Bois de Boulogne, Tro- 
cadero, Eiffel Tower, Pantheon de la Guerre, Les Invalides 
and Napoleon's Tomb, Luxembourg Gallery and Garden, 
Pantheon, St. Etienne-du-Mont, Cluny, Palais de Justice, 
Ste. Chapelle. Louvre, Place Vendome, Place de l'Opera, 
Montmarte, Sacre-Coeur, Place de la Republique, Pere La- 
chaise Cemeterv, Place de la Nation. 



His Sister — "You think Betty does not care for you, but 
have you any proof of it?" 

lack — "Yes; proofs are obtained from negatives and she 
has rejected me six times." 



Escorted and 
Independent 



Tours to Europe 



Write for Program 



DEAN & DAWSON, Ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



ERNEST F. RIXON, general cAgertt 

544 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone Sutter 2J42 



16 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1927 




BEGINNING on January 1st, there was an increase in 
salary granted to 470 citv employees, ranging from $10 
to $25 per month. These increases will add $70,000 a year 
to the salary roll of the city. .Municipal carmen were granted 
an increase' of 20 cents a day; the wages of janitors, clerks, 
trackmen and car repairers were granted an increase of 40 
cents a day. The already authorized increases will add $166,- 
000 to the pay roll of the city. 

* * * 

— With respect to the above increases "The City" which is 
a publication issued by the San Francisco Bureau of Govern- 
mental Research, says that what is needed is "the application 
to the whole municipal service of salary standardization based 
on the scientific classification of employments." 

* * * 

— The California Supreme Court has decided that all Cali- 
fornia bays and harbors, regardless of the distance from head- 
land to headland, within the confines of the state, are amen- 
able to the Fish and Game Laws of the State. That will 
put an end to floating fish reduction plants in California 
waters. 

— YVe should like to have some able economist discuss 
frankly the exact economic effects of the Community Chest 
upon the community, as a community. Hear in mind we are 
not in any way reflecting on charitable effort, but simply, as 
a piece of economic enterprise, we should really like to know 
what its effects are. This standardized, industrialized char- 
itable effort is so new that we are a bit shaky in our com- 
prehension of it. 

+ H= * 

— The Pacific Gas and Electric Company has listed its 
new preferred and common stock of $25 par value on the 
San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange. Trading in these 
listed securities has begun. 

* * * 

— Approximately 60 per cent of the operating revenues of 
the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. are derived from sales of 
electricity, 35 per cent from sales of gas, and the remainder 
from street railway and telephone operations and the sale of 
water and steam. 

* * * 

— On January 5th a flock of wild geese, flying through Wil- 
lows, dashed against the P. G. and E. power lines and broke 
down 250 feet of wire. The wires were up again and carrying 
current within 40 minutes. 

* * * 

— One of the most amusing comments upon the municipal 
management of public utilities is the fact that Long Peach, 
which is engaged in the business of selling gas, implored its 
customers to "go easy" on the use of gas during a cold spell 
when gas was particularly wanted for heating dwelling houses. 
Think of a "predatory" corporation doing a thing like that ! 

— The Nation's credit losses, according to the executive 
manager of the National Association of Credit Men, were 
$800,000,000 last year. Huge as that sum is, it was $100,000,- 
000 less than in 1925. The losses through unwise extension 
of credit have been reduced quite markedly since 1898, when 
they were $300,000,000, on an amount of business not more 
than one-fifth of the present volume. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10TH, 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks 

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1926 

Assets $111,776,567.46 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,553,000.00 

Employees* Pension Fund over $565,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement Si. and 7th Ave. 

1IAICHT STREET BRANCH Haiftru and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid o~i Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (AV') per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 




San Frnncloco, < nllf. 
444 Market Street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $20,000,000 $20,000,000 Reaerve Fond 

AH Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC 
CREDITS Issued, CANADIAN COLLECTION'S eftected promptly 
and at REASONABLE RATES. OVER 550 BRANCHES THRU- 
OUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; PORT- 
LAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO. 

San FrancUco Office: I'D California Street 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE W. J. COULTHARD 

Manager Ant. Manager 



Compensation, General Liability, Plate Glass, Accident and 
Health, Fidelity and Surety, Burglary, Automobile Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Walter W. Derr, Manager 

105 Montgomery St. San Francisco, Calif. 

Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer! of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PENSTOCKS, 

FLUMES, GASHOLDERS, SMOKESTACKS. ETC. 



Los Angeles, Calif. 
5717 Santa Pe Avenue 



THE HOMER SYSTEM 

ACCOUNTANTS — AUDITORS - COLLECTORS 

Supervision of C. P. A. 
Excellent Legal Connections 

Financial Statements, Balance Sheets, Tax Reports, Book- 
keeping Systems; Bonded collectors of Bad, Doubtful, Slow 
Accounts ; Notes Vigorously Prosecuted. 

DeYoung Building, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Garfield 2024 



W. W. 

NOTARY PUBLIC- 



HEALEY 

INSURANCE BROKER 



206 Crocker Uulldlnjr (Opposite Palace Hotel), Snn FrancUco 
Phone Ke&rny S91 



February 12, 1927 



T1IK SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



17 




By Eleanore F. Ross 

An English ingenue with a worldly-wise girl friend in 
London, a priggish aunt who spent most of her time in mak- 
ing jam, and various and sundry gentlemen friends whom 
she meets in the pastoral little town, "Dovecots," in Lon- 
don, and later on, in Paris — these are the characters in the 
frivolous little hook "Blondes Prefer Gentlemen," by Nora 
K. Strange. 

It is cleverly written, and readable from start to finish ; it 
might even at times, raise a laugh from the most blase of 
fiction readers; and it cannot be called a waste of time to 
peruse it, for the reason that, there being nothing in it to 
digest, it can be easily assimilated in an hour's time at the 
most. 

There are amusing incidents scattered throughout this 
little satire, and the heroine's naive expressions in relating 
"delicate" situations is very appealing; some of her con- 
clusions savoring of the worldly-wise, only always written 
in the childishly precocious way affected by the author. 

Her definition of a socialist: 

"Decima is a socialist ; 1 mean she wants everything 
other people have got, and she is much more interested in 
pulling down institutions than building new ones"; 

Her idea of the classical in art, while visiting the Petit 
Trianon in Paris, with a friend: 

"I did not look much at the tapestries, because they are 
embarrassing to look at when you are with a gentleman, 
they are so classical ;" 

Her philosophy on marriage: 

"A bridegroom doesn't matter much at a wedding, but 
you have to remember him afterwards." are all samples of 
her shrewd outlook on life, always clothed in the language 
of a (supposedly) very innocent young English girl whose 
life has been spent in a very English village. 

"Blondes Prefer Gentlemen," by Nora K. Strange. J. S. 
Ogilvie, Publishers, New V<»rk. Price $1.25. 
* * * 

Grecian Mythology will always hold a fascination to those 
blessed with imagination, and the youth of today will find 
a value in those games and athletic sports which delighted 
the girls and boys of ancient Greece and Rome. 

That is why the little volume, "Festival and Civic Plays" 

from Greek and Roman Tales, should be in the libraries ol 

the Hoy Scouts, or any other organization interested in 

growing lads and lassies. 

It is an instructive as well as entertaining book, for not 
onh doe> it depict in short sketches, the lives of various 
preek and Roman characters, but also several of the great 
philosophers, and as an appendix gives a vocabulary deal- 
ing with pronunciation of ( I reck and Latin names prominent 
in ancient history. 

"Festival and Civic Plays." by Mari Ruef Hofer, Beckley- 
Cardy Co.. Chicago. Price. $1.25. 



Dahlias Society 

The Dahlias Society, this year, will hold the first of its 
series of monthly meetings. Thursday evening, February 24, 

in the assembly room of the Phelan building. Various ex- 
perts will speak .mi dahlias, supported b) this organization 
as San Francisco's official flower, on which action was taken 
a year ago. The gorgeous dahlias which grow in this city 
prompted the lively movement in recognition of the dahlia. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



Smarty 

Father (looking at son's report card) — "Do you know 
that George Washington was at the head of his class when 
he was your age?" 

Son — "Yes. but he was President of the United States 



/hen he was your age, 



pop.- 

* 



-Caliper's Weekly. 



The passion for realism in the theatre has reached the 
point of providing real food on the stage for the actors. 
The next step seems to be to get hold of some real actors. — 
Passing Show. 

* * * 

A correspondent in a Scottish paper, commenting on the 
politeness of Londoners, says that as he left his table in a 
restaurant the waiter wanted to shake hands. It is not for 
us to shatter such a touching faith in kindly human nature. 
— Humorist. 

* * # 

"It would be a good thing if France understood our for- 
eign policy," declares a writer. It would be a much better 
thing if we understood it ourselves. — Passing Show. 

* * * 

Wife — "The maid has just given notice ; she said that you 
spoke insultingly to her over the telephone yesterday." 

Husband — "Great Scott! I thought I was speaking to 
you." — Pele Mele (Paris). 

* * * 

Hi — "Say, wher've you been?" 
Lo — "To a wedding. 

"Any g 1 ?" 

"Rotten." 

"Who got married?" 

"I did." — Stanford Chaparral. 

* * # 

"My conscience bothers me." 

"I didn't know you had a conscience." 

"Then it must be my stomach." — Dartmouth Jack-o'- 

Lantern. 

* * * 

Stop — "So she proved untrue to you, eh?" 

Lite — "Yes, she went back to her husband. — Brown Jug. 

* * * 

The Uncertain Moment 

"Are you insured against theft, fire, storm and accident?" 
"God only knows — I've just finished reading the insur- 
ance policy." 

* * * 

Smuggling through the Customs is an unpatriotic action, 
savs a writer. People who do it forget their duty to their 

country. — Passing Show. 

* * * 

This month marks the seventh anniversary of our na- 
tional Prohibition. Fifteen men on a dead man's chest. Yo, 
ho. ho, and a bottle of Government alcohol! 

* * * 

A French writer says that America was not discovered 
b) ( olumbus in search of the riches of India, but by a 
Frenchman in search of fish. The result of our foreign loans 

seems to substantiate this theory. 

* * * 

Spain has its bullfights, but the United States has its 

elect i. 

* * * 

Flo — "What's the difference between a girl and a horse?" 

foe — "I don't know." 

"I'll bet you have some great dates." 

ihio State Sun Dial. 



18 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1927 



SOCIETY 

(Continued from Page 9) 
time in California in past years and have 
friends in San Francisco. 



number of 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter Strvker of Madison, Wisconsin, who 

are wintering in California, have taken apartments at the 

Hotel Whitcomb for the season. 

* * * 

Mr. J. Francis Murray of Monterey entertained a num- 
ber oi friends on the occasion of his birthday, last Saturday 
evening with a dinner dance at the Hotel Whitcomb. 
Special decorations of spring flowers were used on the 
table. Mr. .Murray's guests were Misses Grace Campbell, 
Kitty Roelofsz, Eileene Sprague. Cora Davis; Messrs. 
Thomas Law, Robert Morrison, Pat Murphy; Mr. and Mrs. 

Wilfred Mattock. 

* * * 

At Santa Maria Inn 

The following people have been guests at the Inn during 
the past week : 

Bishop and Mrs. Burns and the Misses Burns, all of San 
Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Jas. H. Brand. Mrs. Mabel Russ, 
and Mrs. Oscar Ingels, all of San Francisco; Mr. A. E. \ elt- 
man of Amsterdam, Holland, accompanied by Miss Alice 
Ayer of Pasadena, and Mr. and Mrs. Stanton W. Foreman 
of" Pasadena; Mr. Axtell Byles and Mr. J. B. Deacon, both 
of New York, and Mr. G. A. Coulton of Philadelphia; Mr. 
and Mrs. E. Palmer Gavit of Santa Barbara, accompanied 
by Miss Evlyn M. Turner of Colorado Springs, and 
Miss Dorothy' Fithian of Santa Barbara; Mr. and Mrs. 
Milner Gibson of England ; Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Friend, Miss 
Jean Elizabeth Friend, Miss Wray and Miss Gift, all of 
Sidney, Australia, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Gordon 
Clift of Maisland, Australia; Mrs. Henry H. Zellerbach and 
Miss Zellerbach, both of San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. B. M. 
Joseph of San Francisco; Mr. Louis G. Henes of San Fran- 
cisco; Mrs. Gerald Williamson and Mrs. J. M. Naylor, both 
of San Mateo; Mr. T. W. Pelham and Miss Kate Pelham, 
both of Boston, Mass., and Mr. C. T. Crawford of San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

At Castle Hot Springs 

The following people have registered at Castle Hot 
Springs Hotel, Hot Springs, Arizona; 

Mrs. Redmond Stevens, Burlingame. California; Miss 



Claudine Spreckels, Mrs. Kenneth W 
California; Mr. and Mrs. Win. W. Cr> 
Crocker, Burlingame, California; Lord 
cona, London, England. 



ilsh, Burlingame. 
icker, Miss Helen 
and Lady Strath- 



Romantic California 

The Reciprocity Luncheon of the 1). A. R., Northern Dis- 
trict, was held at The Clift. Eighty members were in at- 
tendance, and Mrs. Theodore llooder. Vice Regent of the 
State, acted as Chairman. 

Mr. George Barron, Curator of the Golden date Museum, 
spoke on the Romantic History of California. Barron gave 
it as his opinion that the five greatest dates of the world's 
history are as follows: First, when God gave Moses the 
Commandments. Second, when the Magna Charta was 
signed. Third, the Fourth of July, 1776, when we decided 
to become an independent country. Fourth. Armistice Day, 
November 11, 1918. Then, going back a bit, the fifth great- 
est date was in 1848, when gold was discovered in California 
and changed the commercial history of the entire world. In 
that year 250.000 people came to California. 



Young Mrs. ( ireen (at bank teller's window) — "I wish to 
open an account here." 

Teller — "Very well, madam. How much do you want to 
deposit?" 

Mrs. Green — "Why, nothing. I want to draw out forty 
dollars." — Boston Transcript. 




LOU W. SARTOR, Prop. PHONE GRAYSTONE 428 

LOU SARTOR'S SERVICE STATION 

We Carry AM Popular Brands Eastern and Western Oils 

New Method Washing and Polishing 

Equipped With Latest Type Hydraulic Lifts 

Oiling and Greasing— Battery Service 

AT CALPET GAS STATION 



Pun! and Franklin Streets 



San Francisco, Cnlif. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

FALACE GARAGE 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
HAVE \ (II It CAIIS WASHED AMI GltEASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

llnH-x: .".."m; per day; $7.50 per inn nth 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

• lac I I.m.i -is for Service and Storage of Automobiles 

Graystone 130 Open Day an4 Night 

SHERWOOD GARAGE 

Strictly Fireproof Building, Class A Construction 

Live Storage a Specialty 

1600 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

in conjunction with 

Si. George Garage, 410 Bush St. Monarch Garage, 1361 Bush St. 

Management of Wm. Saunders 



TRUNKS - RACKS - BUMPERS 

In Stock or made to order 

EASY TERMS 

THE WIZARD COMPANY 

1803 VAN NESS AVE. 



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THIRD STREET GARAGE 

Sterling Anderson, Mgr. 

Three Blocks from S. P. Depot 
Cor. Third and Folsom Streets 

NEW FIREPROOF GARAGE 

ItepalrfnKi Olllnpr, Greasing Washing and Polishing 

Gnsollne Oils Sundries 



1140 GEAHY ST. 




TEL. GUAYSTONE 42«C 



Metal Work Apper- 
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Welding — lllin-k- 
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AUTO FENDER AND RADIATOR WORKS 



The more particular you are, the better 
you will like us. 

La Grande & White's Laundry Co. 

"The Recommended Laundry* 1 
250 Twelfth St., Sax Francisco 'Phone Market 916 



February 12, \"27 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



Petrol Paragraphs 




By E. V. Weller 

Director of Publicity 

National Automobile Club 

WEATHER conditions are im- 
proving in all parts of California 
and early spring touring is already in 
progress, according to recent reports. 
The snow barriers on the High Sier- 
ra roads will soon be removed under 
the influence of the summery sun and 
traffic already shows an increase on the 
main trunk lines of the state. 

Winter snow sports arc becoming 
very popular at Mineral, which is on 
the Red l!lull'-Susan\ ills road. 

Some snow will be encountered at 
the timber-line beyond Paynes Creek. 
Working the road with a snow sled 
has put the road to Battle Creek bridge 
in good condition. Some snow will be 
encountered between Battle Creek and 
Mineral. Local parties are going to 
drag the road from Battle Creek Bridge 
to Mineral so that parties going in for 
bobsledding. skiing, etc.. can reach 
Mineral without any discomfort. Sat 
unlay night and Sunday accommoda- 
tions are now available at Mineral. 

Following is a report on the snow 
Conditions in the I I igh Sierra : 

Snow will he encountered on the 
Yuba Pass at ;i point 7 miles above 
Downieville. However, cars are driv- 
ing to Sierra City, although chains are 
advisable on the dirt stretch between 
Downieville and Sierra City. There 
are eight feet of snow at the summit. 

< hi the Plaeerville road the snow 
line will he encountered ten miles be- 
yond Plaeerville. It is possible to drive 
to Riverton hut chains are advisable. 
At the present time there arc one hun- 
dred and fifteen inches of .-now at the 
summit. 

The Red Hlutt' to Susanville road is 



closed and cars are driving as far as 
Mineral, where there is 1 ' _■ feet of 
snow. There are 2' ■ feel of snow ;it 
Morgan Springs and live feet of snow 
at the summit. 

Snow will he found on the Colfax 
Road at a point 12 miles above Colfax, 
and cars are getting as far as Alta 
without any great difficulty. There are 
eight feet of snow on the Truckee sum- 
mit. 

More than 90,000 license plates 
were distributed by the National Auto- 
mobile Club through its' various 
branches throughout California in the 
last month, according to announce- 
ment of Arnold Hodgkinson, General 
Manager. The Los Angeles office, 
alone, distributed 32,000 plates. 
* * # 

More than three million maps have 
been distributed by the National Auto- 
mobile Club, according to a report is- 
sued by the Engineering Department 
of that organization. The maps issued 
by the National indicate the conditions 
of the roads, whether paved, improved 
or ordinary dirt surface. They are is- 
sued in uniform, compact form and 
are checked and rechecked for accuracy 
in Field Agents, traveling over the 
highways of California every day of 
the year. 

New maps of the Tahoe and Yo- 
-emitc districts have just been com- 
pleted by the Engineering Department 

and are now available at all offices of 
the Club. 



GOING UP 



At this season of the year, 
bills as a rule are higher 
due to longer lighting 
hours and more heat- 
ing hours. 



PACIFIC GAS AND 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PLEASURE'S WAND 
o lontlnued from Page 7 i 
lean I'.edini. juggling star, who, like 
In- well-known contemporary. \\ . ('. 
Fields, has also won fame in the com- 
edy field, will offer "A Juggling Trav- 
esty," agisted by Bluch Landolf and 
Nan. The act is mure for laughing pur- 
es than a demonstration of skill. 

Ilie screen pla\ fur the week is 

"Risky Business," a comedy drama, 
with pretty \ era Reynolds as the star. 
The story is of a wealthy girl whose 
society mad mother is against her love 
match with a struggling young physi- 
cian. There are many comedy scenes, 
si me thrills ami several tense dramatic 
situations. Kenneth Thomson and 
Xa-u Pitts have the featured support- 
roles. Short films and orchestral 
numbers complete the bill. 



City boy 1. Miking at his first wind- 
mill: "Gee, Uncle Tom. that's some 
electric fan out there cooling the COWS.', 

* * * 

'-he — What business are you going 

ack ? 
He — Lumber business. 
She — You have a fine head for it. 




"PACIFIC SEBV1CI" 



Owned - Operated - Managed 
by Californians 



©well's 

^-**^ VATIONAl CPES1 




^Companion of 
tlje morning • • 
it* refreshing • 







"""~»^ 



GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6651 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

l.soo.ooo cups were aerr-ed at the 

Paaamn-Paciuc International Expoaltla 



20 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12, 1027 



il 



■svX/*- 



-^M- 



j9" 



GOLF 

By Fred Blair 



o-fi-c 



-^JST 



s-lt-a 



•*5^,J^JJS ,, * 




Harrv Hi lp, 

Champion G'llfir of 

the Stui Francisco 

Civil/in Club. 



THE Civitan Club of San Francisco, which sallies forth 
each week to the St. Francis Hotel Italian Room to 
put on the feed bag and relate their experiences of the past 
week, put on their annual golf championship and election of 
officers at the Lake Merced Golf and Country Club. 

The affair was more of a swinging and stuffing contest 
which lasted from 9 a. m. on Friday until 7 a. m. the next 
day. 

The boys arrived at the golfing grounds Fully prepared 
to cut up the course and put it iii perfect shape. 

There were ninety members and guests who made up the 
party, including Dr. Harry Topping, from Sacramento; lack 
Lawrence, president of the Sacramento Civitan Club; 
Frank Prior, former district attorney; and Sam \Y. Cross, 
an attorney also from the capital city. Oh! I nearly forgot 
Dr. J. R. Jones! 

F. (',. Mullins was there from Los Angeles. Mullins is 

a very forceful speaker and gave the boys a g 1 talk at 

the banquet, but some of them were too charged with 
White Rock to appreciate what Mullins had to say. 

Dr. James Eaves, one of the directors of the I lakland 
Civitan Club, introduced the members from his own club, 
including Elewarth Thorp, the club's president, ami Bill Tully, 
Mayor of Tully Town. 

Dr. Jim didn't forget his friend Billy Hon, the Bulletin's 
cartoonist. Billy has been giving the Doc a lot of cheap 
publicity of late so he couldn't pass him up. 

When the atmosphere had cleared up, after playing IS 
holes of golf, chasing the little pellet all over the' lot for 
over ten hours, with a short rest for lunch, some of the cul- 
prits turned in cards that resembled the Union Iron Works' 
pay roll on Saturdays. 



Hilp the Champ 

Harry Hilp, who, when not playing golf is in the con- 
tracting business, was chairman of the day. Harry showed 
his appreciation by copping the championship, winning a 
beautiful hip-pocket flask which he said he would use to 
carry his coffee in when he goes hunting. 

Hilp came all prepared to win a prize, because he had 
more trophies than there were players, so everybody got 
one. 

They presented Hilly Hon with a script hook, because 
they knew he didn't drive a car, and the writer got a case 
of Scotch perfume when they knew he was on the water 
wagon. 

After the hoys had taken their showers and cooled them- 
selves off with some coca-cola, they proceeded to play a 
little African golf until the feed garage was open. 

Tom Monahan was elected cop for the evening, hut he- 
fore you could park your tired legs under the banquet tabid 
Tom posted himself at the outer door and relieved you of 
live plunks for the eats. 

The table was in the form of a horseshoe to accommodate 
Joe Eber's lady entertainers, who did their stuff while the 
hoys got away with their salad, steaks, and Shasta water. 

After we had several good numbers, they proceeded with 
the election of officers: Victor Lamoge, president. Harry 
Gietzen, vice-president, John Spear, treasurer, Joe Eber, GaJ 
Sober. Al I '< seller, directors. 

Hilp Takes the Flo^r 

Harry Hilp. who did most of the talking dining the eve- 
ning, got up again to distribute the prizes for the golf win- 
ners of the day. 

We noticed that Hilp picked out a good one for himself, 
in fact he took twi i. 

After Harry had taken his pick he handed Larry Welsh, 
the guest prize. The other winners were: E. C, Smart, 
II. A. Hansen of (lakland, Sanford Hyams, Ed Sickel, Er- 
vin Steiner, Han Levin. Fred Solari, Al May, Dr. lames 
Eaves, Leon Solomon, Paul I'rlueger. Joe Eber. Chic Whit- 
church, Tom Taylor. V. E. Bule, and C. E. Van Fleet, Billy 
Hon and the writer. 

When we were down to the fifth course of the meal. Joe 
Eber sprang a couple of nifty banjo artists on us, later he 
had a cartoon artist drawing some of the diners, but it 
was up to Hilly lion to make the speech of the evening. 

Bill put it over in good shape, hut they weren't satisfied 
with his talk, they all wanted to see Billy take the chalk and 
draw a cartoon of Phil Friedman, the tailor. 

Bill drew such a ,good likeness of Phil, that Joe Eber 
wanted to sign Bill up for the Orpheum stage. 

Dr. James Eaves and Chic Whitchurch infused a bit of| 
pep into the party by putting on a French cartooning act. 

The act was all right hut their French was terrible. 

After the two young ladies, with their million dollar 
-miles, had entertained us with a few classy songs, the 
evening was voted a- one of the best that the Civitan Club 
had ever put on. thanks to our good friends, Joe Eber and| 
Tom Mahoney, the Civitan's leading literary light. 
* * * 

Fred Mullins, of Los Angeles, came especially prepared 
to invite the local Civitans to meet the boys from the South 
in the near future. 

You know Mullins made a long trip to extend this invita- 
tion, but he was also interested in forming intercity meet- 



February 12, 1927 



Till s.W FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



21 



Bigs aiming- tbe various Civitan clubs in the State. 

The Civitans have made great progress during the past 
few years and it won't be long before they will be repre- 
sented in every country in the world, just as the Rotary 
Club is. 

Sanford Hyams, vice-president of Civitan International, 
is working hard to that end, and only quite recently Oak- 
land got their charter, and have built up a fine club in a 
short space of time under the leadership of Elewarth Thorp, 
as the president. 

After the splendid showing at the local Civitan annual 
golf tournament and banquet, which was held at Lake Mer- 
ced Golf Club, many of the visitors went home feeling that 
the Civitans have built up a fine organization in San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

Arthur Slee in London 

Arthur Slee, the patent attorney, who has been sojourn- 
ing in Europe for the past eight months, radiographed his 
good wishes for the success of the golf tournament. 

Slee was the president of the local Civitan Club, but un- 
fortunately he was called to London to pass on several 
large patents, so in his stead Sam Whitehead, vice-presi- 
dent of Civitan acted during his absence. 

Sam infused a lot of pep into the Tuesday luncheons 
which are held weekly at the St. Francis Hotel. 

Among those who attended the golf tournament and 
banquet were Sanford Hyams, Marion Mayers, Harry Hilp. 
H. A. Hansen, E. C. Smart, Chic Whitchurch, Ed Sickel, 
E. Heymans, lrvin Steiner, Dan Levin, George "Topsy" 
Davis, B. Karacick. D. G. Kendall, Fred Solari, V. E. Bule, 
Al May, Leon Solomon, Joe Eber, Dr. James Eaves, E. C. 
Van Fleet, F. McGueren, Dr. J. R. Jones, Tom Taylor, Tom 
Monahan, H. Hartwell, Sam Stern, Paul Pflueger, Victor 
Lamoge, Phil Friedman. Sam Whitehead, Albert Samuels. 
Dr. Harry Topping, F. (i. Mullins. F.llcwarth Thorp. Bill 
Tullv. 



Valentine Ball Featured at Tahoe Tavern 
Visitors to this American Saint Moritz are not only of- 
fered every type of winter sports but also a varied program 
of social activities. 

On Saturday evening, following a dinner dance with 
Valentine and heart theme carried out in table and dining 
room decorations, there will be a Valentine's ball in fancy 
costume, featuring the lovers of history, Abelard and 
Heloise. Romeo and Juliet, Dante and Beatrice and many 
Other famous couples of history will be portrayed. The 
costumes will be for rent at the Tavern and will not increase 
baggage difficulties for week end guests. Many delightful 
house parties are planned for the week ends in February, 
the hosts taking their guests to the Tavern rather than 
opening their lake side house-. The coming week end over 
Lincoln's birthday. Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Fleishhacker are 
entertaining a group of friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Klamp, who have just returned 
from spending a year in Europe, are stopping at the Tavern 
for the remainder of this month when they will return to 
their home in 1 lollvwood. 



Second Annual Fiesta De Las Rosas 
( Kltstanding amongst California's many spring celebra- 
tions this year is Santa Clara County's Exposition of Pro- 
gress anil Second Annual Fiesta de ia- Rosas, commemor- 
ating its 150th Anniversary at San Jose. Vpril .V to May 7. 
The business leaders of San [ose and Santa (.'lata County 
are busily engaged these days in gathering the many his- 
torical relies that were in use when the padres walked along 
the \lameda. In 1777. the first pueblo in California was 
located where San lose now stands. To commemorate 
Bbese 150 years an exposition of great magnitude i> being 
held in conjunction with the Second Annual Fiesta de las 



Rosas, "Northern California's premier floral pa 

An ( )ld Settlers Campaign is being carried on and the 
point has been reached where the winner will have to claim 
oyer 88 years of residence in the county if he is to "win." 



The Traffic Question 

( )ne of the commonest infractions of traffic laws prac- 
tised by the motorist or truck driver whose consideration for 
his fellow beings is nil, is his refusal to pay any attention 
to the automatic stop and go signs for the reason that there 
is no officer in charge, and therefore he does not need to 
fear arrest. 

This flagrancy the police department proposes to rectify 
by placing plain clothes men to cope with the situation near 
every stop and go station. 

But in the recent discussion regarding infringement of 
traffic regulation, the matter of cutting corners was not 
stressed, and this is one of the most frequent causes of ac- 
cident. 

The reckless driver, generally a mere boy, instead of 
performing a wide sweep around the corner of a street, 
steers as closely to the curb as possible, to save time, and 
this "time saving" only too often ends in life taking. The 
ordinary spry pedestrian can avoid being hit in crossing 
an arterial street, but he is completely at the mercy of the 
"corner cutting" fiend. 

This murderous habit should be considered a major, in- 
stead of a minor infraction of the traffic law. 



George Creel, prominent as government official, lecturer 
and author, will speak in the Paul Elder Gallery, Saturday 
afternoon, February 12th, at 2:30 o'clock, on "Trials and 
Tribulations of an Historian." Mr. Creel is the author of 
the latest complete, interpretative history of Mexico and the 
Mexicans entitled "The People Next Door." In this work 
he covers a great deal of ground with a celerity that is amaz- 
ing, affording a vivid picture of Mexico from the earliest 
times. Major attention is devoted to tbe relations between 
our country and Mexico. There will be no admission charge 
to his lecture. The public is cordially invited. 

Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL, ELDER'S LIBRART 
239 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 



MADE TO ORDER ON LY 

~lhosEKeni Shirts k JhosUCeal 

Pajamas CJTTTTYT*^ 7 

Nicht Roses "^HlKl^ 

Large Assortment of Imported Fabrics 



25 Kearny Street 



Phone Kearny J714 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 



583 Po«t Sttuwt 
I* YmciiiA Horn. 



Paruian Dytinf and Cleaning 



Sam Funciic* 
Phoii Fkanklin SS1I 



J. SPAULDING & CO. 

Eatabllahrd 1S(H 

The Original Pioneer Carpet and Rug Cleaners 

X5S TEHAMA STREET, SAI* FRANCISCO 
Pkonr Donclaa 3064 



22 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 12. \92 



RADIO 

(Continued from Page 14) 

12:00 p. m. — Time signal. 

] 2 :00 p. m. — Livestock; produce. 

12:i)4 p. m. — Weather. 

12:15 p. m. — Organ recital. 

3:15 p. m. — Talk. 

3:30 p. m. — Matinee for housewives. 

4:30 p. m. — Culinary hints. 

4:45 p. m. — Fashion review. 

6:00 p. m. — N. Y. Stocks. 

6:08 p. m. — Chicago grain; metals; X. Y. 

Cotton. 
ii:l :: p. m. — Livestock; produce. 
6:20 p. m. — News bulletins. 



49«C*t» 




; h a B me PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, whe- 
ther it be type- 
writer paper or 
manuscript cov- 
er, means com- 
plete satisfac- 
tion. There is a 
grade for every 
need. Ask your 
„^ _ ... . ^ printer or sta- 

lirtjmHJ ^TOT $.l u n s e aUi e S sh0W 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1S55 
41 First Street, San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Rented — Sold — Repaired 

Established 43 Years 

RATES REASONABLE 
TERMS IF DESIRED 

American Writing Machine Co. 
506 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 649 



San Francisco 
Laundry 

(A Soft Water Laundry) 



San Francisco 

Wut 793 



Bnrlingome 
478 



Max Rosenthal 

Where Good Tailoring 
Costs Less 

A choice selection of seasonable 
Woolens suitable for Formal, 
Sport and Business wear is now 
ready for your early considera- 
tion. ; 

527 Post Street, San Francisco 
opp. olympic club 



Friday. February 18 

11:45 a. m. — Weather. 

11:48 a. m. — N. Y. Storks. 

11:55 a. m. — Chicago grain: metals; X 1. 

Cotl on. 
11:58 a. ni. — Livestock: produce. 
12:00 p. m. — Time signal. 
12:00 p. m. — Livestock: produce. 
12:04 p. mi — Weather. 
12:15 p. ni, — Organ recital. 
3:15 p. m. — Talk. 
:: so p. oi. — Matinee. 
i :30 p. ni. — Question box. 
4:45 p. in. — Fashion review. 
C:00 p. in. — X. Y. Stocks. 
6:08 p. in. — Chicago grain; metals; X. Y. 

I 'ottoil. 

6:13 p. ni. — Livestock: prodl 

6:20 o. in. — News bulletins. 

6:30 I hi - I 'inner concert. 

7:00 p. 111. — "Aggie KirkoiTs." 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday 

School lesson. 
S:00 p. in. — Instrumental program. 
8 . i :. p. in. — si udii progi am. 
Saturday. February lit 

11:45 a. in. — \\'e:i tiler. 

1 1 : Is a. in. — X. Y. Slocks. 

11:55 a. in. — Chicago grain: metals; X. Y. 

Cotton. 

I l :5i o. io. — Livestock. 

12:00 o. in. — Time signal. 

12:00 p. in — Livestock: produce. 

12:04 ]». in. — Weather. 

t 2 : 1 .". p. in. — Organ recital. 

10:30 i< in — I ei nc< program. 



KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT STORE, 
SEATTLE— 454.3 

Monday. February 14 

4:30 to sag ]). m. — "Afternoons At Home." 

6:00 io 7:00 p. ni. — Dinner music. 

7:00 to 7:30 ]>. m. — Harold Weeks in Popular 
Song Program. 

7:30 to sun) i in. — Cruise of tin- Sound Perry 
Line Buccaneers. 

8:15 lo 8:30 p. m. — Industrial Mews. 

*:::ii io in mi p. m. — Studio Program. 

Tueaday, February 1." 

12:30 to 1:30 p. in. — Luncheon Program, 

2:00 to L':::n p. m. — Homemakers' and Shop- 
pers' Bureau. 

4:::n to 5:00 p. m. — "Afternoons At Home." 

6:00 to ,ini p ni — Dinner music. 

7:30 io vim p. ,n, — Pitchford Twins. 

8:00 lo s:::(l p. m. — Bridge Game. 

8:30 i" 9:80 p. m. — .Male Quartel 

9:30 to ln:3li p. m . — Entertainers. 

Wednesday, Februnry 1C 

12:30 to 1:30 p. in. — Luncheon Prom-am 

- 2:30 p. in. — Homemakers' and Shop- 
pers" Bureau. 

4:30 lo ;, p. m. — Afternoons At Home." 

8:00 lo 7:iiii p. m. — liinner music. 
7:ii'i to s:i)n p. ni. — Entertainers. 
8:00 t.. 9:00 p. m. — Orchestra. 

9:00 to in p. m.— Orchestra and Solcdsts 

Thursday. February 17 

12:::n to 1:30 p. m. — Luncheon Program 

2:00 to :::::il p. m. — Homemakers' mi, I Ship- 
pers' Bureau. 

4:30 lo :,:iiii p. ni. — "Afternoons At Home" 

n :mi I" 6:30 p. m. — liinner .Musi,, 

6:30 to , :::n p. m . — Orchestra. 

8:00 io 8:80 p. ,„. — rj oc p,.,„.] ss 

8:30 to 9:30 p. m. — Trio n,. Luxe 

Friday, Februnry is 

l- ::: " to i :::n p. m — Lunei n Program 

2:00 to 2:30 p, m. — Homemakers' and Shop- 
pers' Bureau. 

J" 5 p. in. — "Afternoons At Home " 

»:00 to r:00 p. m. — Dinner music 

ciiii to S:iui p. in.— studi., Program 

- 9:00 p. in. — Concert Orchestra 

■'■"" i" 10:1 m. — Serenaders. 

I ". :: ;'.' "' '-" i. m— Weekly Frolic of the 

Keep Growing Wiser i irder ol I i nwis" 

broadcast from KGW. 
Saturday, February i» 
-':«" to 2:80 p. m. — Homemakers' and Shop. 

pi rs Bureau. 

1 30 to 5:00 p ni.— "After, ,,s ai Home." 

!'■! :00 p. m.— Dinner music. 

' v -'" ' '■ ni.— Popular studio Program. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
THE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. 

location of principal place of business, San 
i'rancisco. Calif. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular 
meeting of the Directors held on the 18th day 
of January 1927, an assessment of one-half 
cent per share was levied upon the issued 
cap tal stock of the corporation payable im- 
mediately in legal money of the United States 
to the Secretary, at the office of the company, 
Room 245 Monadnock Building, .San Fran- 

CISCO. l^cLilf. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall 
rj n i ain unpaid on the 24th day of February. 
iJ r ' wll) be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and unless payment 
is made before, will be sold on Thursday the 
24th day of March, 1927 to pay the delinquent 
assessment, together with costs of advertis- 
ing and expense of sale. 

M. J. SEBLY, Secretary, 
215 Monadnock Building, 
San Francisco, Calif. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



GEO. W. KNIGHT 

Cleaning Service 

New Persian 

Steam or Dry Cleaning 

Pressing — Repairing — Altering 

and Relining 

Individual Attention Given to 

Each Order 

OUlce and Works 1625 Mission St. 

Phone Market 7»ia 
Branch Olllcc: 700 Sutter Street 

(Hotel Canterbury Bt.j.) 
Phone Prospect 0845 

Work Called For and Delivered 




USED 



ADDING, BOOKKEEPING, 

CALCULATING MACHINES 

Guaranteed for One Year 

BOUGHT - SOLD 
RENTED 

GENERAL ADDING MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 

Phone Garneld 3852 5<M Market St. 



William Herbst & Company 

{Formerly with Shreve & Company) 

CLOCKMAKEnS nnd WATCHMAKERS 

CHIME. ANTIQUE AND COMPLICATED CLOCKS 

AND WATCHES A SPECIALTY 

200 Post Street at Grant Avenue 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Call and Deliver in San Francisco, Alameda and 

San Mateo Counties 



875 rOLSOM ST. 



8.8 EMERSON ST. 



PIONEER-GIBSON EXPRESS 

FAST EXPRESS AND 
FREIGHT SERVICE 

San Francisco, San Jose and Way- 
Points Twice Daily 



CAFE MARQUARD 

Adjoining Wilkes and Curran Theaters 
GEARY AND MASON 

Phone Prospect 61 

^REVUE^, 

Nightly 
THE CONTINENTAL FOLLIES 

A Bevy of Pretty Girls 
DINING— 6 p. m. to 1 a. m.— DANCING 




Aladdin Studio Tiffin Room 

The City's Most Distinctive Oriental Show Piaee 

Luncheon Tea Dinner Supper 

a la Carte 



SOc, 75c, $1.00 
Dat 



3Sc, SOc, 7Sc S1.00.S1.SO 
ing 7:00 p. m. to 1:00 a. m. 

363 Sutter Street, Telephone Douglas 3974 

SPECIAL PARTIES ARRANGED 

HEADQUARTERS FOR THEATRICAL PEOPLE 

Hattie Mooser Minnie C. Mooser 




^ 



ICE CREAMy 

CANDY 

PASTRY 



BREAKFAST 
LUNCHEON 
DINNER 




L 



LA CASA BIGIN 

411 STOCKTON STREET (By tile Tunnel) 
Telephone Sutter 274 

Luncheons — Teas — Dinners 

ITALIAN CUISINE 

Diui.idti from <: p. in. to 1 n. m. 



EL DORADO HOTEL 

SONOMA, CALIF, 

The finest meals in the 

VALLEY OF THE MOON 

Clean Rooms, Clean Linen, Clean Everything 

Ralei Exceptionally ReaionabU 

Telephone 110 



4F% CAROLINE Jo N E S 


aflL'A^^ 


Luncheon is served from 11 :30 to 2:30 


^P 


and tea from 3 to 5 
Exclusive use of room for club dinners. 

334 Sutter St. Douglas 7118 



CAMILLE'S ROTISSERIE 

Try Our French Dinners, $1.50 — Also a la Carte 

Merchants' lunch 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. (a la carte). Private din- 
ing- rooms for banquets and partlea, seating: 76 to 100 people. 



441 Pine Street 



Phone Kearny 468 



AGUA CALIENTE SPRINGS 

Why? It's the Water and the Table. 

New dance hall. Special attractions. Radio-active, hot sulphur water 

tub baths and swimming pool. Fireproof hotel. Write for booklet. 

T. H. CORCORAN, Acua Caliente, Sonoma Co., Calif. 

or see Peck-Judah 

V^ALiltlN It V ILL A CARL STEFFEN . p RO p 

French and Italian Dinners — Meals at All Hours 

Modern Rooms — Private Cottages 

AGUA CALIENTE 

4 Minutes Walk to Fetters Station, Sonoma County, California 

Telephone Sonoma 4F4 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS WATER 

"Bottled at the Springs" 

Five Gallons for Fifty Cents 
WATER SERVICE COMPANY 

229 Clara Site*! — Garfield B44 



O'Farrell and 

Lark in pi.. 



BLANCO'S 



Phono 
Crayilone 8100 



Weekday*. Luncheon $ ,75 

{11 JO to 2 p. m.) 
Dinner, Week D«r. and Sunday. 1.50 



No Viiilor Should Lear© th« City With- 
out Dining in the Fm.it Cafe 
in America 



Our Main Dining Room is open again on Sundays. 



Dr. B. Franklin Pearce 

PYORRHEA SPECIALIST 

Hours: 9-12, 1-5 

980-82 Flood Buildinc, Powell and Market Sts., San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 5394 



NOAH'S 
ARK 



Featuring Southern Cooking 
Open From 
11:30 a. m. to 2:00 p. m, 
530 p. m. to 3:30 p. m 
Sundays and Holidays 
4:30 to 8:30 p. m. only 

CLOSED EVERY MONDAY 



ifyftOr- 



It Mai Uoi'U 



US Third Avenue, SAN MATEO 


Half Block from HtKhvraT 








■ ■■••■ iii"** 1 i 



Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant 

open joo a. m to m» P. M. 

omsobfassed cuisnra 

Casj. Leo>haedt 

Fnrmmtf «f C«ld.n Gat. Par* CffjhM 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
-771 to 777 Valencia Street. Bet. 18th and 19th 9ts., 
San Francisco. Phone Market 64 



Chapel 




AUBURN 



Established 1000 




8-88 Roadster 

Auburn "finish and performance" are characteristic of high-priced motor cars, though 
Auburn prices are moderate. 



1930 Van Ness Ave. 



L. H. KNITTEL 

Sax Francisco Phone Graystone S3S0 



5^/LTONEWYORK 

See MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA, PANAMA CANAL and 
GAY HAVANA, en route 



1 




Panama Mail Liners Are Specially Built for Sei 



Sister Ships: 
SS VENEZUELA 
SS COLOMBIA 
SS ECUADOR 



I in the Tropic 



The c 
meals or 
as little 
Mail Jin 
sailing. 

Murrh I! 

VENEZU 



548 S. SPRING STREET 

LOS ANGELES 



2 PINE STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 HANOVER SQUARE 

NEW YORK 



TWENTY-EIGHT days of pure delight aboard a palatial Panama Mail liner with 
leven never-to-be-forgotten visits ashore at picturesque and historic ports — Man- 
zanillo, Mexico; San Jose de Guatemala; La Libcrlad, Salvador; Corinto, 
Nicaragua. Two days in the Canal Zone; see the great Panama Canal; visit Balboa, 
Cristobal and historic old Panama. 

Every cabin on a Panama Mail liner is an outside one; each has an electric fan, 
and there js a comfortable lower bed for every passenger. There is an orchestra for 
dancing; deck games and sports and salt water swimming tank. The Panama Mail is 
world-famous for its food and service. 



Costs Less Than $9 a Day 

ost is less than $9 a day for minimum first-class passage, including bed and 
, steamer. Co East by Panama Mail and return by rail (or vice versa) for 
as $350. (This price doe* not include berth and meals on trains.) Panama 
ers leave San Francisco and New York approximately every 21 days Next 
from San Francisco: SS COLOMBIA, February 19 ; SS VENEZUELA 

From Los Angeles two du>s later. WeBlward fl New York: SS 

ELA. February 5; SS ECUADOR, February 26. 

For illustrated booklets and further details ask any steamship 
or ticket agent or' tor it e to 

PANAMA MAIL S. S. CO. 




"A Six-pointer" 



"Napa Dry" Ginger Ale 

Six Points That Recommend It: 

Point 1 — It blends perfectly. 

Point 2 — Sparkles like champagne. 

Point 3 — Handsome package — it graces any table. 

Point 4 — A joy in the sick room. 

! Point S — Children, as well as adults, enjoy it. 

J Point 6 — A delight to every sense — taste, sight and 
J bouquet. 

Packed by 

NAPA SODA COMPANY 

( Phone Market 117 San Francisco, Calif. 



L 



iv^vlaia^ jriw^vjivrviYio, rv^n. hdai wejdiv, in iniC3 loauc 




$5.00 PER YEAR 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CENTS 



Saturday, February 19, 1927 LOS ANGELES 

? a r v y 




Seeing the 'world from the top of San 
Franeisco — the Mark Hopkins Hotel. 




Mrs. A . O. Stewart and Miss Elizabeth Stewart, wife and 
daughter of the President of the Golden Gate Ferry Co. 

Hfiss Stewart officiated at the christening oj the new jerry, 
"Golden Bear" which will ply between San Francisco 
and Berkeley, beginning next June. 

Through the institution of this new jerry line, one oj 
San Francisco's greatest needs jor an out-let, will have 
been competently and speedily supplied. 




Established July 20, 1856 



$*N WNciscq 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 

The San Francisco News Letter and California Advertiser was founded July 20, 1S56, by Frederick Marriott. Publ'shed by Frederick Marriott, Jr.. from 1884 to 1925. 
Is now printed and published weekly by Frederick Alfred Marriott. 268 Market Street. San Francisco. California. Telephone Kearny 8857. Entered at San Francisco. 
California. Postoffice as second-class matter. London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornliill. E. C, London. Encland. Subscription Rates lincludine postage), one year. 

So. 00. Foreign, one year. S6.00. Canada, one year. SO. 00 



Vol. CIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., FEBRUARY 19, 1927 



No. 8 



3 Bad Men 



By E lean ore F. Ross 



ACTING on the deduction that when Uncle Sam desig- 
nated a man to represent his vast country as the 
"Official Artist of the United States Navy" on its cruise 
in 1925 to the Antipodes, the man he chose must be, as 
a matter of course, brilliantly competent to fill such a 
position, I sought Charles Henry Grant on the subject of 
art, a subject which has brought the conservatives and 
radicals of San Francisco's art colony to loggerheads. 

"There is really no 'new art'," said Mr. Grant; "art 
belongs to no particular time, place or people. This post- 
impressionistic movement is simply history repeating 
itself. Early in the 19th century the pre-Raphaelites 
existed ; at the same time in France, the Barbizon school 
was instituted, of which Corot might be taken as a good 
example; later, Claude Monet founded the impressionistic 
school, then came post-impression, cubism, futurism; all 
a revolt against classicism. But revolution is not always 
evolution. 

"It was in 1912 that Roger Fry of the London Nation, 
wrote enthusiastically of an exhibit then taking place in 
London, which consisted of the paintings of the three 
Apostles of the post - impressionistic school — Cezanne, 
Van Gogh and Gauguin. At that time. Fry mentioned 
Sargent as one of the sponsors of this exhibit, but Sar- 
gent repudiated this assertion indignantly, saying: 'The 
truth of the matter is, I can find no art in this exhibit 
except in the work of Gauguin, which is admirable in 
color, and in color only.' 

"It is a significant fact that Cezanne's reputation was 
originally created by Emil Zola, who wrote him up as a 
hero in one of his volumes; publicity agents, as we would 
call them in these days, made much of this fact, in 
marketing Cezanne's pictures, and I do not think I am 
wrong in saying that Cezanne's success was due to the 
popularity of the French author, instead of his own 
artistic efforts. 

"His work is unfinished, sketchy, flat. Japanesque. The 
modernists have emphasized Cezanne's faults (which he 
knew, himself, to be faults) into virtues. Cezanne (mark 
this!) was horn in Aix. France, in L838. 

"Van Gogh, who said of his own paintings: 'If my 
Bgures look ridiculous to me. what must they look to 
other people?' committed suicide in an insane asylum. 

"Gauguin, whose mother was a Peruvian Creole, was 
a gnat admirer of Cezanne's, but the latter remarked: 
'Gauguin does not understand me: lie is not an artist: 
he is merely a reproducer of Chinese images.' 



"Gauguin eventually made the South Sea Islands his 
home, where, we must admit, he was appreciated by the 
aborigines, who responded quickly to his flamboyant 
colors. 

"The savage is attracted by glaring colors; give him 
a blanket in greys, and he refuses it. The ability to put 
pleasing patches of color together, is not art, but science, 
and it can be learned from any elementary book on color. 
Painting is primarily an objective art, but ugly shapes 
in crude colors cannot produce beautiful thoughts. 

in ex- 
rn out 
limits, 
every- 
finest 
art is 
super- 
in this 



"An artist should not be hindered in any way 
pressing himself; otherwise he is not likely to tu 
the best that is in him ; but self-expression has its 
If a child wishes to express himself by sweeping 
thing from a table and demolishing his mother's 
china, we know what happens to that child. If 
merely 'self-expression,' then all art schools are 
fluous, for any child without training can qualify 
'new art' which is no art at all! 

"A modern critic remarks of this new art: 'I object 
to going down into a cellar at midnight, with an unlighted 
candle, looking for a black cat which is not there.' 

"These modernists have nothing to say, and their freak 
manner of expression is just a smoke screen to hide that 
fact. 

"A favorite sentiment of the modernists is Emerson's: 
'To be great is to be misunderstood.' There are several 
hundred thousand people confined in insane asylums who 
could complain of being 'misunderstood.' 

"Art is a patient lady," Mr. Grant went on. "She has 
been interrupted in her progress by these so-called Revo- 
lutionists all the way down the path of artistic history. 
They have denounced her and accused her of never hav- 
ing produced in all the time she has been in existence, 
any real art. In fact, they say she is an impostor. She 
stops, listens patiently to the ravings of this horde of 
fanatics, extracts the good (if any) rejects the bad, 
brushes these impediments to her progress aside, and 
mi her way. always forward. 

"The present debauchers of art do not seem to realize 
that this so-called modern painting is a half century or 
more old: recent reports in the newspapers show that all 
freak work was conspicuous by its absence in the latest 
exhibit at the Independent Salon. This Salon was the 
last stand of the post-impressionists, the cubists, the 
futurists: freak painting, then, we must conclude in 
Paris, the nucleus of the art world, is passe." 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1927 







The return of February 22nd focuses 

George Washington the attention of each American upon 
George was, s ^ ^ ^^ ^ gtately dlgmty f 

the great founder of this nation. As the years go by, 
that figure becomes more imposing and the grandeur 
which distinguished George Washington becomes better 
understood. ., 

This year it is particularly apropos that we should 
consider the personality of our great leader for two dis- 
tinct attempts have been made to explain our first Presi- 
dent by biographical criticism, that would appear to 
diminish the distinction with which all Americans, in- 
dependent of opinions or faiths, have agreed to invest 
him It must not be assumed that there is any objection 
on our part to searching and accurate biographical ma- 
terial On the contrary, we prefer such a method very 
much to the plaster saint and mythical hero type of his- 
torical writing. So that these historical adventures are 
not objects of our animadversion. 

They have shown that Washington had some of the 
weaknesses and a few of the foibles of the rest of us; 
that in fact he was a man, not a demi-god. He was fond 
of business, had amiable little weaknesses, like a passion 
for counting ; was susceptible to kindly attention, liked a 
little flattery and so on. It has also been fairly well 
shown that he was not a prodiguously great general, from 
the standpoint of military criticism. Neither was he a 
great and farseeing statesman, as statesmen are ap- 
praised in terms of history. 

But he was more than all this, he was a great man in 
every sense of that tremendous term. He was brave, 
tenacious, firm, just and had the faith that moves moun- 
tains. He was born a leader and always ready to accept 
leadership. He was a true Father of his Country. 



there are no broken bones and none can well complain. I 
On the other hand, there should be a way for society to 
meet those crimes which occasionally arise in industrial I 
disputes, and less often in political conflict. The proposed ' 
amendment seems to go to the real matter in issue and] 
to offer a decent solution. 



Of all the opponents of the Prohibi- 1 
Prohibition Must Go tion Amendment and of the Vols- ' 
tead Act there is none more able 
and, surely, none more conscientious and determined than 
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler of Columbia University, 
whose attacks upon the administration of the Volstead 
Act have brought upon him the enmity and abuse of all 
the hot gospellers of prohibition. 

There is one good out of all controversy ; Senator Borah 
and Dr. Butler have agreed together to present, each of 
them, the prohibition issue to the electors of the country. 
Borah, of course, will take the side in favor of the present 
law. 

In reply to questions as to his definite attitude on the 
matter, Dr. Butler says: "I am in favor specifically and 
definitely, of the repeal of both the Eighteenth Amend- 
ment and of the Volstead Act. It would make me very j 
glad to have the Republican party take that position." 
And he further goes on: "I should not oppose the Repub- 
lican Party pledging itself specifically to the upholding of 
the Eighteenth Amendment as long as that Amendment | 
remains a part of the Constitution, provided that the 
declaration be so drawn as to make it plain that this 
enforcement of the Eighteenth Amendment is always and 
everywhere to be accompanied by the enforcement of the 
other provisions of the Constitution, including particu- 
larly those contained in the first ten amendments which 
constitute the bill of rights." 

This latter expression is very astute, for the Amend- 
ment itself is in contradiction of those constitutional 
provisions which secure the personal liberty of the indi- 
vidual. Dr. Butler is a clever advocate, for it is obviously 
impossible to enforce the Eighteenth Amendment, which 
admittedly invades personal rights, and at the same time 
to enforce those constitutional provisions whose purpose 
is to secure personal rights. It will be interesting, after 
this, to listen to Senator Borah. 



The Criminal Syndicalist 
Syndicalist Law Amendment Law is being attacked in 

the present Legislature by 
a measure looking to its amendment in a very important 
particular, which goes, indeed, to the root objections to 
the Act. We have called attention already to the report 
of Dr. Kirchwey, in which he comments with all his legal 
knowledge and authority, adversely to the operation of 
this Law. There is no doubt at all that the Law has 
worked much hardship and has done the State no good 
in the estimation of the world. 

The primary fault of the Law as it stands at present 
is a foolish endeavor on the part of the legislators to 
make matters of opinion punishable as crimes. The Law 
starts with the definition that Criminal Syndicalism is "a 
precept or doctrine." In spite of any court decision we 
maintain that the United States Constitution is against 
punishing the mere holder of a doctrine or precept, what- 
ever that doctrine or precept may be. Law exists for the 
punishment of acts. Acts of violence, in industrial or 
political disputes should be punished. Acts of violence, 
constituting breaches of the peace are punishable under 
the ordinary penal law. 

The bill for the amendment of the Criminal Syndicalist 
Law introduced by Senator Fellom proposes to define 
Criminal Syndicalism as an unlawful act of violence, em- 
ployed in industrial or political disputes. This would 
seem to be a satisfactory change. If there is no violence, 



There is a new body of law 
New Criminal Procedure proposed for the State to deal 

with the speeding up of crimi- 
nal trials and to attempt to stem the tide of growing 
crime. 

There is no doubt that the crime situation requires at- 
tention. There is too much crime and too much time is 
spent with the handling of criminals. There is a place 
where the frontiers of sympathy and folly are close 
together and it is easy to stray into foolishland from 
kindlyland. This is too often done and the criminal is 
coddled and careless modes of handling interfere with 
the proper administration of justice. Such has been the 
case many times and no doubt will be again. Then the 
criminal waxes fat and the state treasury becomes de- 
pleted. 

After an experience of this sort, there is a natural but 
very illogical swing of the pendulum to the other extreme 
and an era of criminal hunting supervenes, in which the 
accused is treated as game to be brought down rather 
than as a human being with certain civil rights. Even 
lawyers are in the habit of forgetting that because a 
man is on trial it does not follow that he is a felon. They 
want to get after felons and, to do so, seem to try to 
prevent the innocent establishing his innocence, or at 
least to make it as easy as possible for the prosecution 
to show him guilty. We are not convinced of the super- 



February 19, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



natural sagacity of the prosecution. We do not bank 
our faith on the illimitable knowledge of district attor- 
neys. For that reason, we do think that a change in the 
law, which would make it count against a man that he 
did not take the stand, is a backward and not a forward 
step. We are also of the opinion that waiving of jury 
trial is not a good thing in criminal cases. All that tends 
to shorten the time of cases, we agree with. 



From Brighter Pens than Ours 



A week or two ago the Cantonese 
Canton Crumbles government had the opportunity to 
make a new treaty with Great Britain 
which would have recognized the influence of the South- 
ern part of China and might have contributed to the 
success of the nationalist movement of which Canton has 
so far been the most distinguished champion. Now, 
however, if we can judge by reports, affairs are not so 
promising. 

The Cantonese, carried away by success, did not agree 
to the terms which the British were ready to accept and 
there has been a delay in the signing of papers, all of 
which has not aided the Cantonese. For in the meantime, 
the British had the idea that it was necessary to protect 
their people and the troops began to move. This brought 
a protest from Canton that the Chinese would not sign 
any treaty while British troops were on Chinese soil. 
There they overlooked their hand and made a mistake 
which the wily British statesmen have been too cunning 
not to take advantage of. 

The matter was raised in the House of Commons, the 
Labor Party, which is now the minority party, attacking 
the government for the transportation of troops to 
Chinese soil. The answer of the government was com- 
plete. The troops were not being transported to Chinese 
soil. On the contrary, they Were going to Hong Kong, 
which is British territory, and, if it should prove that the 
Chinese could not give British subjects protection, then 
the troops would go to Shanghai for the purpose of pro- 
tecting British lives. The reply was unanswerable. For 
none can gainsay the fact that a country must defend 
the lives of its own nationals. 

In the meantime, the armies are rolling down from the 
North and the Cantonese, a thousand miles from their 
base, are facing a critical condition of affairs. China may 
be a nation some day, but evidently not just yet. 



The motorists of California contributed 
Motorists Pay no less than $6,913,700 to the mainte- 
nance and repair of the State highways, 
according to the statement of Frank C. Snook, chief of 
the division of motor vehicles, in automobile license fees 
during 1926. This is a tremendous contribution to be 
made by one class of citizens. 

Of the sum so contributed. §3,721, 114 was paid directly 
to the State Highway Commission for use on the State 
highways. The counties received a like sum from which 
was deducted the sum of $529,129 to pay the salaries and 
expenses of traffic officers. The balance of the sum, minus 
the deductions, was apportioned to the counties in pro- 
portion to the number of automobile registrations, for 
road work. 

It thus appears that the automobile is becoming a very 
distinctive wealth asset which so far at least has not 
shown any sign of diminishing in spite of all the pro- 
phecies about "saturation." California is, perhaps, the 
most distinctly automobilist of any country in the world 
or state in the Union. That fact proceeds from the un- 
paralleled wealth of this community. This is very clear 
from the enrolment of vehicles which shows a gain of 11 
per cent in one year. The net gain in number is 164.545. 

This increase was universal throughout the State, all 
counties showing a substantial gain. Los Angeles County 



Mexico is justified in holding its own, but not in hold- 
ing ours — Philadelphia Record. 

* * * 

Women's clothes were never funnier — if brevity is the 

soul of wit. — Arkansas Gazette. 

* * * 

Europe always wants something — if it isn't doughboys, 

it's dough. — Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

There are none so blind as those who won't see that the 

label is a counterfeit. — El Paso Times. 

* * * 

The trouble is that there are so many laws and such a 
limited supply of respect. — Florence (Ala.) Herald. 

* * * 

There doesn't seem to be much trouble meeting ex- 
penses — one meets them everywhere. — Wall Street 

Journal. 

* * * 

If the Marines can protect American property in Nica- 
ragua, why not try them in Chicago ? — Stanford Ad- 
vocate. 

* * * 

Thank goodness, we didn't recognize the Soviet Gov- 
ernment and have to back it up with Marines. — San Jose 

News. 

* * * 

Much of the liquor that is being sold in New York 
these days is guaranteed to last the drinker a lifetime. 
—El Paso Times. 

* * * 

A republic is a land governed by any minority that hap- 
pens to know just what it wants. — West Palm Beach Post. 

* * * 

A college education seldom hurts a man if he's willing 
to learn a little something after he graduates. — El Paso 

Times. 

* * * 

Speaking of heredity, if you successfully hold your nose 
to the grindstone, your children's may turn up.— Pub- 
lishers Syndicate. 

» * * 

The French have at last adopted our word "home." 
Probably they argue that we don't need it any longer. — 
New York Evening Post. 

* * * 

The proof of will-power is continued possession of your 
tonsils. — New Haven Register. 

* * * 

"Drink to me only with thine eyes." After drinking, 
you may not have any eyes. — Macon News. 

* * » 

The great Powers apparently have decided to treat 
China more liberally, even if they have to use force to do 

so. — San Diego Union. 

* * * 

"Why do women hold their chins when thinking?" 
reads a heading. Probably to stop themselves from inter- 
rupting. — Wall Street Journal. 

* * * 

The hardest knock yet on Senate oratory is the news 
that after listening two hours Colonel Smith developed 
an infection of the ear. — Chicago Daily News. 

» * * 

As we get Senor Diaz, Mexico is putting the "nick" in 
Nicaragua. — Washington Star. And Dr. Sacasa is chew- 
ing the "rag."— Colorado Springs Observer. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1927 




pLMSURlSW^ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURES 

lorn Hoore- 



On Top of the World 

LEGENDARY pitfalls of the stage 
are no more dangerous than danc- 
ing a modern version of an Indian 
war dance on top of the Hotel Mark 
Hopkins, highest point in San Fran- 
cisco. 

If you doubt this statement, ask 
Helen Pachaud, star of the brilliant 
Wright dancers, who a few morn- 
ings ago held a "workout" on the roof 
of the Mark Hopkins. 

With the San Franciscan hills and 
the city far below to inspire them — 
the Mark Hopkins orchestra to "pep" 
things up — and California's blue sky 
bowl, shot with western sunshine for 
background, even the Black Bottom 
which the girls "simply couldn't help" 
indulging in, seemed aesthetic. 

And such a little trifle as clamber- 
ing, kicking and posing about the 
outside edge of the Mark Hopkins 
roof — nineteen stories above the 
crest of Nob Hill. Nothing! Posi- 
tively. 

There were photographers there, 
of course. So Miss Pachaud honored 
her Indian great-grandmother by ap- 
pearing in a wampum-headed, be- 
feathered costume inspired by her 
red-skinned forbears. Then perched 
on the edge of the roof after looking 
over the city, she agreed that the 
"old home town" sure has changed 
since the days of long ago. 



Grand Opera 

Our own Alice Gentle, whom San 
Francisco claims by right of admira- 
tion and possession, captivated the 
audiences this past week, especially 
in her "Tosca" and "Carmen" roles. 

"Alice Gentle is a thorough actress ; 
she lives her character roles, impart- 
ing the artistry distinctly her own, 
as well as charming and holding us 
with her liquid tones," said the music 
critic of an afternoon paper whom I 
happened to be fortunate enough to 
meet just after the first performance 
of the San Carlo Opera at the Curran 
Theater the opening night. 

She is "Tosca" and she is "Carmen" 
not only singing the character roles, 
but making one convincingly assured 
that she lives the parts she essays 
with such artistry and histrionic skill 
as well as satisfying our music-loving 
thirst for opera. 




By Josephine Young 

Alice Gentle has been given an 
ovation on every appearance in the 
Curran Theater, where the San Carlo 
Opera Company is now making its 
11th annual visit to San Francisco. 

* * * 

Curran 

Eight performances will be given 
this coming week, completing the six- 
teen announced in advance notices 
from the Curran Theater. In all the 
repertoire there is but one repetition. 

Tina Paggi, Italian coloratura so- 
prano, is one of the newcomers whose 
voice has captivated us. 

Loranzo Conati, baritone; Andrea 
Mongello, basso; Gino Lulli, baritone 
— all young Italian singing-actors are 
on their first American tour. 

Another young singer appearing in 
the present engagement is Miss Viola 
Graham, daughter of Captain S. V. 
Graham, chief of the staff, 12th Naval 
District, San Francisco, who will this 
coming week sing the role of Nedda 
in "I' Pagliacci." 

* * * 

Wilkes 

"Castles In the Air"! Everybody 
is talking about this charming oper- 
etta. At every performance there 
are curtain calls and recalls, for the 
singers deport themselves most skil- 
fully and walk right into the heart 
of one. 

Probably one of the very best sing- 
ing and dancing choruses the stage 
has ever presented here, is to be 
found in "Castles In the Air." This 
chorus, itself, is well worth the price 
of admission. It numbers 80, so the 
programs tell us — and as we don't 
take time nor care to count them, we 
rest assured that twice forty is the 
number — at any rate, every one is a 
singing and dancing unit contribut- 
ing to the perfect ensemble. 

Entering upon its fourth successful 
week we dare not hope for a much 
longer engagement, owing to other 
bookings elsewhere — so take your 
happiness along with you — and see 
"Castles In the Air," an "overwhelm- 
ing musical comedy" at the Wilkes 

Theater. 

* * * 

President 

"The Family Upstairs," new com- 
edy of American family life, which 
has proved a success wherever it has 



Amusements 

NEXT WEEK 

ON THE STAGE 



Alcazar, O'Farrell, nr. Powell 

"If I Was Rich." Henry Duffy players. 

Columbia, 70 Eddy 

"The Arabian." Walker Whiteside. 

Curran, Geary, nr. Mason 

San Carlo Grand Opera Company. Sunday, 
"Forza del Destino"; Monday, "Boheme"; 
Tuesday, "Cavalleria Rusticana" and "Pag- 
liacci": Wednesday, "Lucia"; Thursday, "Jew- 
els of the Madonna"; Friday, "Madame But* 
terfly" ; Saturday matinee, "Lohengrin" ; Sat- 
urday evening, "Aida." 

President, McAllister, nr. Market 

"The Family Upstairs." Henry Duffy players. 

Wilkes, Geary at Mason 

"Castles in the Air." Musical comedy. 

VAUDEVILLE 



Golden Gate, G. G. Ave. and Taylor 

"The Blonde Saint." Lewis Stone, DoriB Ken- 
yon. Vaudeville. 



Orpheum, O'Farrell, nr. Powell 

Cecil Lean and Cleo Mayfield headlinging bill 
of vaudeville. 

Pantages (New), Market at Hyde 

Anniversary Week. Film stars in person. 
"The Winning of Barbara Worth." 

Union Square, O'Farrell, nr. Powell 

"The Masquerading Bandit" and five acts of 
vaudeville. 

Wigwam, Mission and 22nd 

Vaudeville-Pictures. 

ON THE SCREEN 

DOWN TOWN 

California, Market at 4th 

"Altars of Desire." Mae Murray and Conway 
Tearle. Attilio Laria conducting the orchestra. 

Cameo, Market, opp. 5th 

"Men of Purpose." Official war picture, spon- 
sored by Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Capitol, Ellis, near Market 

"Alaskan Adventures." Scenic Adventure. 

Casino, Ellis at Mason 

"Hot Water." Harold Lloyd. 

"The Girl Who Wouldn't Work." Lionel 

Barry niorc. 



Granada, Market at Jones 

"The Third Degree." Screen version of famous 
melodrama. Dolores Costello, Louise Dresser, 
Eddie Pcahody and Granada Sweethearts. 

St. Francis, Market, bet. 5th & 6th 

"The Beloved Rogue." John Barrymore, Con- 
rad Veidt, Marccline Day, Henry Victor and 
Lawson Butt. 



February 19, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Varfield, Market, nr. Taylor 

"The Demi Bride." Norma Shearer, Lew Cody. 
Carmel Myers. The Honorable Wu in His 
Feast of the Lanterns. Rube Wolf. 
UP TOWN 

Uhambra (New), Polk and Green 

"The Clinging Vine.*" Leatrice Joy. Feb. 19-20. 
"Summer Bachelors." Feb. 21. 22. 23. Madge 
Bellamy. "Stranded in Paris." Bebe Daniels. 
O'Neill Sisters' Kiddies. Friday evening. 

loyal, Polk, nr. California. 

Special showin g of pictures. 

ieen staged, will be presented by 
lenry Duffy at the President Theater 
.t the matinee Sunday afternoon, 
iaid to be distinctly one of the better 
Jays of the season, it comes here 
leralded as a highly amusing offer- 
ng. 

Helen Keers, remembered for her 
ine work in a similar characteriza- 
ion in "The Show-Off," has been 
mgaged for the role of the mother. 
Kenneth Daigneau returns to San 
Francisco after a long absence to ap- 
>ear as the young and ardent suitor. 
_,eneta Lane is the daughter, a part 
n which she made a hit when the 
)lay was produced in Washington. 
Dliver Hyde and Elsie Bassett will be 
ieen as two other children, and Earl 
liee is cast for the father. 



Columbia 

Walker Whiteside comes to the 
Columbia Theater Monday night in 
lis great success, "The Arabian," by 
he author of "The Hindu." 

In his role of "Abdu El Rey" the 
landit king, Mr. Whiteside has cre- 
ited a vivid personage appealing to 
he imagination. He is a man of 
louble personality, known to the 
Vrabs as their ruler and in London 
ind Cairo, he is reckoned as a power- 
ul financier. 

A fine drama is "The Arabian," a 
laming play bringing with it the 
nagic of North African desert lands. 
jameo 

"Men of Purpose," the historical 
licture which, today, Saturday, Feb- 
uary 19, begins a two weeks' engage- 
nent at the Cameo Theater, is a liv- 
ng epic of human strife, with every 
cene registering actual action on the 
•attlefields of the World War. 

The Veterans of Foreign Wars rep- 
esented by seven Posts of the County 
Council of San Francisco, have rented 
he Cameo Theater outright during 
he showing of this marvelous spec- 
acle. Every scene was photographed 
>y cameramen attached to the photo- 
rraphic sections of the allied nations 
ind the central powers whose armies 
'ought in the greatest conflict the 
vorld has ever known. 

R. Bruce Chester, chairman of the 

feneral committee of the Veterans of 



Foreign Wars, spent years preparing 
the films for the authentic picturiza- 
tion which reveals history in a pul- 
sating page of immortal drama. Com- 
mander S. Ephron is chairman of the 
advisory committee. Proceeds from 
"Men of Purpose" are to be used for 
the post activities of the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars. 

* * * 

Opening Ceremonies 

Mayor James Rolph, Jr., city offi- 
cials and military dignitaries will 
take part in the opening ceremonies 
at the showing of "Men of Purpose," 
Saturday night, with special enter- 
taining features for the stage in 
keeping with the tone of the great 
picture. 

American troops fighting in the 
famous Argonne Forest, at Chateau 
Thierry, their arrival in France, and 
the sight of General Pershing with 
one million Americans are only a few 
of the thrills in the picture. Every 
nation that took part in the war ap- 
pears on the screen. The Italians 
making their way across the Alps, 
sometimes waist-deep in the snow — 
the Canadians — in fact every allied 
nation has some place in "Men of 
Purpose," which will have its Cali- 
fornia premiere Saturday night at 
the Cameo. 

The only scene that is posed is the 
assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, 
the act which started the World War. 
No part of the picture has ever ap- 
peared before on the screen. 

Educators, and those who will, 
probably in the future, learn Ameri- 
can history from such authentic pic- 
tures, are enthusiastically sponsoring 
the presentation of "Men of Purpose." 

* * * 

St. Francis 

"The Beloved Rogue," the mad and 
in turn gentle career of Francois Vil- 
lon will be thrown on the St. Francis 
Theater screen Saturday. 

The story is brought to the screen 
by an actor who is perhaps best fitted 
to portray the famous vagabond — 
John Barrymore. 

Barrymore is supported by a strong 
cast including Conrad Veidt, noted 
German actor, Marceline Day, Henry 
Victor, Lawson Butt and others. 

* * * 

Alcazar 

"If I Was Rich." merry comedy, 
continues to draw to the Alcazar 
Theater, where the Henry Duffy 
players appear to advantage in this 
sparkling drama. 

Phil Tead takes the part of a young 
shipping clerk. Gay Seabrook of the 
ingenue tvpe plays opposite. Louis 
Jon. Bartels of "The Show Off" fame 
is here in this play with his match- 
less laugh. Howard Hull Gibson is a 
principal every one seems to like. 



Warfield 

"The Demi Bride," the new Metro- 
Goldwyn - Mayer comedy starring 
Norma Shearer, comes to the War- 
field screen Saturday, with Lew Cody 
and Carmel Meyers also featured. 
"The Demi Bride" is the story of a 
young, unsophisticated schoolgirl of 
France, played by Miss Shearer ; Car- 
mel Meyers has abandoned her role 
of siren to be a straight out-and-out 
flirtatious wife ; Lew Cody is the man ; 
Dorothy Sebastian, Lionel Belmore, 
Tenen Holtaz, Kate Morgan and Nora 
Cecil complete the cast. 

Fanchon and Marco present on the 
stage a colorful Chinese Fantasy fea- 
turing the Honorable Mr. Wu and His 
Feast of Lanterns. The Honorable 
Mr. Wu was educated in San Fran- 
cisco, and brings with him a company 
of Chinese players, who sing and 
dance. There is also a Chinese or- 
chestra which plays jazz as it was 
played in China thousands of years 
ago. An excellent musical program 
will be given by the greater band 
under the direction of Rube Wolf. 



Golden Gate 

Roy Cummings, one of the original 
vaudeville laugh provokers, is booked 
as an attraction on next week's pro- 
gram at the Golden Gate Theater. 
With the assistance of Irene Shaw, 
he will offer a love - making scene : 
"One Afternoon." 

A second big feature on the week's 
bill is a picture, "The Blonde Saint." 
It is a story of a novelist who had a 
belief that he understood women. 
His adventures with a pretty girl sup- 
ply the theme. Lewis Stone and 
Doris Kenyon are the stars. Among 
other features, Tabor and Greene are 
colored singers and comedians. Ade- 
laide Hermann, "Queen of Magic," 
widow of the famous magician, Her- 
will present illusions. She is the 
mann the Great. 

Claude Sweeten's Golden Gate or- 
chestra supplies excellent musical 
numbers in orchestrations and screen 
interpretations. 

* * * 

Orpheum 

Cecil Loan and Cleo Mayfield. 
Broadway musical comedy stars, 
headline the new bill at the Orpheum, 
this week, beginning Saturday. 

Other acts on the bill include Miss 
Juliet, presenting "A One Girl Re- 
vue" in which she is assisted by Har- 
old Solmon at the piano; Joe Xie- 
meyer and Una Fleming, musical 
comedy favorites, in a pot-pourri of 
dances: Tad Tieman and his tune- 
smiths, with Pinkie Toes, eccentric 
comedian and dancer, assisted by 

(Continued on Page 14) 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1927 






Bv Antoinette Arnold 



Masquerades — Great 
Society Favorites 

"Why does everybody like to wear a mask?" 

Who knows, except that everybody does. Perhaps, it 
is because, in the secret heart of most of us, is a longing 
to be just something else, or somebody else, rather than 
what one is ! 

At any rate, masquerade parties are always a success. 
Invariably so. Whether it be a Mardi Gras, with its 
elaborate accessories, given for the benefit of Charity ; 
or, whether it be "just a party." 

One reason, no doubt, is that a masquerade gives one 
the chance to express his originality. Maybe the costume, 
itself, is not so grand, but, it provides expression of out- 
of-the-ordinary, and the more artistically it is carried 
out in its entirety — the greater its attractiveness. 

* * * 

The Mardi Gras 

Preparations for the 1927 Mardi Gras indicate that 
this year's Society event will transcend all preceding 
ventures. 

To begin with — the Mardi Gras pageant is to be elab- 
orately staged with gorgeous tableaux supervised by 
experts. Fairyland, and the lovely legends of our child- 
hood, will be the motif of a magnificent Mardi Gras, given 
for the benefit of the Children's Hospital, on the evening 
of Tuesday, March 1, at the Fairmont Hotel. 

The entire floor of the famous hostelry on Nob Hill 
has been reserved as a fitting setting for the elaborate 
event, with special attractipns in the terrace room, the 
laurel court, the gold ballroom and the Venetian dining 
rooms. 

The decorations will transform the spaces reserved into 

Fairyland — personified. 

* * * 

Aladdin — A Lady 

Aladdin, of the famous fairy tale, will be a lady. 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker has been chosen as the wielder 
of the wonderful lamp. What Mrs. Crocker intends to 
do, in her most original way — will supply some of the 
evening's mysticism. It will be beautiful illusions — of 
that we are assured! 

We anticipate a ravishing costume, for Mrs. Templeton 
Crocker's Mardi Gras costumes have been strikingly 
handsome in the past, and this year, she means to out- 
shine them all, so we have been told. 

Fairy Princess * * * 

Who's to be the fairy princess? 

Well, Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle, who made such a de- 
cided hit at the Junior League show, is to be a princess 
in some part of the fairy story. 

Mrs. Herald Herrman, also a prominent and beautiful 
Junior Leaguer, has been chosen for the role of Snow 
White. She will be surrounded by seven dwarfs, and 
they are to be juvenile dancers from the Kosloff dancing 
studio. 



Puss 

The committee chose Miss Sophie Brownell for the role 
of Puss-in-the-Boots. 

Little Red Riding Hood will be sprightliness imper- 
sonated by Mrs. Angel Elizalde (Marie Spreckels). 

There are a lot more characters to be chosen yet and 
each day some fascinating part is assigned to leaders in 
society and in the debutante set. Many are keeping their 
character parts a secret. 

* * * 

Music Features 

Miss Marion Zeile, chairman of the music committee 
for the Mardi Gras, announces that Art Weidner's and 
Walter Krausgrill's orchestras will supply the music for 
dancing. 

These orchestras will be stationed in the main dining 
room and in the ballroom. Dancing will be a continuous 
performance throughout the entire evening. 

* * * 
King and Queen 

In recent years only a queen has ruled over the annual 
charity Mardi Gras. This year, however, honors are to 
be equally divided between the reigning social beauty and 
the most popular man in society. 

Announcement of a new method for the selection of a 
king and a queen to rule over society's gay masque ball 
was announced this past week by the Mardi Gras commit- 
tee of the Children's Hospital Auxiliary. 

* * * 

Spirited Election 

There is to be no balloting prior to the auction dinner 
to be held in the St. Francis on Wednesday night, Feb- 
ruary 23. Mrs. Laurance Scott is chairman of these ar- 
rangements. This dinner, open to the public, will be> 
served at 7:30, with voting beginning for the king and: 
queen at 9 o'clock. 

Roger Lapham has been chosen auctioneer. He is to> 
be assisted at the board by Jerd Sullivan and Porter 
Sesnon. Reservations for this dinner are now being re- 
ceived by the Hotel St. Francis. 

* * * 

Tableaux 

Mrs. George Bowles and Mrs. Robert Miller are in 
charge of tableaux feature. The decoration of the ball-! 
room and main dining room will be supervised by Mrs. 
Edmunds Lyman and Mrs. Andrew Welch. 

* * * 

Fantastic Costumes 

Members of the San Francisco Yacht Club and their 
friends disported themselves in attractive costume at the 
Fairmont on the evening of February 5. It was a lively 
affair, attended by several hundred. 

Jack Tars and Gypsies were the favorite costumes, 
with the usual number of pierrots and ballet girls. 





SANTA 


MARIA 


INN 






SANTA 


MARIA, CALIFORNIA 






On the 


Coast Highway, Half-Way Between San Francisco and Los 
An Inn of Unusual Excellence 


Angeles 




Wire or write for r 


Eservations on your nex 


trip south 





COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street. Between Powell and Stockton. San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN. Proprietor 



February 19, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



The fancy-duress dance concluded a series 
of four parties, two of which were held on 
this side of the bay and two at the yacht 
club at Sausalito. 

The Fairmont ball was under the manage- 
ment of Clifford Smith, commodore of the 
yacht club, and Harold Williamson. 

The yacht club affairs are sponsored by a 
large social group from the Bay cities. 



The yachting season will open shortly, and 
club members are looking forward to taking 
their smart little craft out sailing. Sunday 
regattas are a feature of the local season and 
scores of flashing white sails add immeasur- 
ably to the picturesqueness of San Francisco 
bay about Sausalito, Belvedere and Tiburon. 




HOTEL CANTERBURY 

750 Slitter Street 

S.in Francisco's Finest 

Famliy Hotel 



Smart Attire Worn 
Builders' Club Cabaret 

The Hawaiian cabaret given by the Build- 
ers' Club at the Fairmont Hotel was a great 
success. The proceeds will be devoted to furnishings for 
the new Woman's building in Sutter Street. The Builders' 
Club, of which Mrs. Christopher C. Barre is the president, 
is planning to give a number of entertainments before the 
close of the social season. In addition to the cabaret and 
dance many enjoyed cards. 



Pretty Gowns 

Mrs. Christopher C. Barre, heading the reception, wore 
a handsome imported model of moonlight sequins over 
shell pink chiffon. Her jewels were diamonds. 

Mrs. Henry Boyen wore a pink chiffon embroidered 
in pearls. 

Mrs. Ira Kahn, black velvet and diamonds. 

Mrs. Albert W. Stokes, president of the City Federa- 
tion, wore a gray satin gown most becomingly made, as 
all her dresses always are. 

Miss Alice Lathrop Kenyon wore a green crepe dress 
trimmed in crystals. 

Mrs. Edward William Kenyon was attired in a black 
sequin gown made over gray satin. 

Mrs. J. E. Butterfield wore a pink chiffon gown em- 
broidered in silk and crystals. 

Mrs. Charles Buthman had on an imported Parisian 
gown of apricot shades. 

Mrs. Joseph Wand wore a midnight blue chiffon dress. 

Mrs. W. P. Medill's gown was of pink chiffon beaded 
in sequins and pearls. 

Mrs. W. E. Brochetti wore white and silver brocade. 

Mrs. W. S. Wetenhall was in pink velvet. 

Mrs. H. M. Nutter wore shell pink embroidered chiffon. 

Miss Jennie Partridge's gown was of orchid chiffon, 
embroidered with sequins and pearls. 

Mrs. Wilson Elliott wore a black chiffon gown. 

Mrs. William Ptiffer wore black lace with pearls. 

Mrs. Clare Harder, white embroidered gown. 

Mrs. Edna Kryn a black and white jet. 

Mrs. Paul S. Curtis was in a pink chiffon embroidered 
in pearls. 

* * * 

Bridge-Tea 

Miss Irma Lavezzola of Oakland, assembled a group of 
friends at a Bridge Tea recently in Laurel Court at the 
Fairmont Hotel, which made a charming setting for the 
affair. The round table had a large basket of pink roses 



250 Rooms 
From S2.50 per day 



in the center, and silver candelabra held pink 
and blue candles. Corsages of roses and 
freesias were the favors, and two tiny scrolls 
in the center of the flowers held the secret, 
being the betrothal announcement of the 
hostess and Mr. Clarence Herkner of Gait, 
California. Miss Lavezzola is well-known in 
social circles of Oakland and Mr. Herkner is 
a graduate of the University of California, 

Class of '21. 

* * * 

Luncheon 

The Misses Flora and Alene Hunter as- 
sembled a group of their friends at a Lun- 
cheon on Thursday at the Fairmont Hotel. 

* * * 

Installation 

The installation, dinner and dance held in 
the Gold and Red Rooms at the Fairmont 
Hotel by District 67 I. 0. 0. F. on Wednesday 
evening, January 12th, was a brilliant affair ; 
Dr. Robert C. Atkinson was Master of Cere- 
monies, ably assisted by a committee com- 
posed of Dr. Caston Pope, Arthur Arbuckle, 
Vice-Chairman; A. R. Young, Secretary; S. E. Kullberg, 
Treasurer ; F. T. Wolfe, Norman Muir, Newton Zobel, Ted 
Borgquist, Alec G. Atwood and John Taylor. After the 
installation of officers presentations were made to Past 
Officers by Noble Grand Officers W. E. Patsel, Ed Kings- 
ley, H. L. Johnson, P. H. Peterson, B. I. Canning, J. C. 
Bone, Fred Burmer and C. J. Abrahamson. During the 
dinner a delightful musical program was given by Miss 
Jean Anderson, Miss Margaret Coswell, Mrs. Frank 
Griesmer, Madam Nina Avedano, Harold D. Atkinson and 
Emmett L. Dorman. About five hundred attended the 
installation, declaring the event one of the most success- 
ful and enjoyable ever given by the joint lodges of the 

I. 0. O. F. 

* * * 

Presidio Hop 

The Presidio Officers' Club was the scene of a pretty 
Valentine party last night at the clubrooms of the Post. 
Valentine decorations were lavishly used, which included 
hearts, balloons and red ribbons. 

A number of interesting and large dinner parties were 
planned before the hop. Lieutenant and Mrs. Richard N. 
Gaw gave a dinner at their quarters which included the 
following: 

Colonels and Mesdames E. A. Sirmyer, E. L. Munson. 

Majors and Mesdames Henry Terrill, Jr., H. A. Kroner. 

Captains and Mesdames S. A. Jacobs, W. T. Kilborn. 

Lieutenants and Mesdames Clayton Snyder, Robert V. 
tenant Lyman, Carnes B. Lee, A. M. Neilson, Lieut. H. 
Sepulveda. 

Major and Mrs. Robert C. Rodgers also gave a dinner 
party at their quarters. The decorations were in the 
Valentine motif, and place cards were set for the follow- 
ing: Elmer C. Desobry. W. V. Carter, William Robert 
White. 

Captains and Mesdames Leon Ryder, Leonard Sims. 

Lieutenants and Mesdames Clayton Snyder, Robert V. 
Thomas, Mrs. W. T. Patten, Col. Thomas Anderson, Miss 

Irmengarde Patten, Mr. Terkelsen, Mrs. T. L. Cherry. 

* * * 

Ryones Home 

Mrs. and Mrs. Le Roy Ryone, who have passed the last 
six months in Europe, have returned to their apartments 

at Stanford Court. 

* * * 

The Alpha Delta Theta Sorority of the University of 
California held a bridge tea at the Whitcomb Hotel last 
Saturday. About 150 attended. 

(Continued on Page 15) 



10 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1927 




RADIO 

By C. J. Pennington 



" T3tf 




C. J. PENNINGTON 



"Aerial Incidents" 



TIMES have changed; the mech- 
anics of the transmitting appar- 
atus is more perfect ; the quality of 
the programs is better; the work of 
the artists is improving; the musical 
taste of the radio public is 100 per 
cent improved. If Congress will only 
pass some sort of legislation to rule 
a lot of unnecessary stations off the 
air, the enjoyment to be had from a 
good receiving set would put every 
one in a good humor. 

* * * 

The Fourth Annual San Francisco 
Radio Show will again be held in the 
Civic Auditorium, starting August 
20, 1927. This promises to surpass 
all former shows, if we can judge by 
the fact that more than fifty per cent 
of the entire booth space is already 
sold. 

* * * 

If your set oscillates, the trouble 
may be caused by too much regenera- 
tion or by a grid leak of improper 
value. Some times squawking results 
because of the grid wire being too 
close to the plate element. The lead 
to the grid leak should be as short 
as possible. This may be accom- 
plished at the detector tube by mount- 
ing the grid condenser and the grid 
leak right on the tube itself. 

* * » 

Senate and House conferences have 
completed the radio control bill. With 
the ratifying of the compromise 
measure listeners will be in a position 
after the first year to enter a protest 
against the renewal of a license to 
any radio station in the United 
States. This is but one of the many 
features of the new compromise radio 



bill which is expected to be ratified 
by Congress and signed by the Pres- 
ident, according to reports from 

Washington. 

» * * 

Too much B-battery voltage or too 
much filament current will cause the 
detector tube to howl or oscillate. 

* » « 

President Coolidge will be heard 
over the air February 22. Tune in on 
KPO on that date between 4 and 5 

p.m. 

* * * 

The radio liar is more respon- 
sible for discontent than anyone else. 
He is the gentleman who tells you 
he gets coast-to-coast reception every 
night. The unsuspecting immediately 
want to add more tubes to their sets, 
and a horde of other miscellaneous 
attachments. 

* * * 

We heard a man say the other day 
he wanted to purchase new tubes for 
his receiver, due to the old tubes 
drawing too much current from his 
"A" battery. The man in the radio 
store said nothing, but sold them to 
him, allowing the purchaser to re- 
main in ignorance. Poor business. 

* • • 

Orders were placed for the latest 
type 1000 watt broadcasting station 
equipment by the Don Lee organiza- 
tion for installation at KFRC. The 
new set, now in the course of con- 
struction will come on the air toward 
the end of May with an elaborate 
opening program. 

* » » 

Five concerts of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra of Los Angeles will be 
rendered over the KPO - KFI radio 
hook-up during March and April, the 
Standard Oil Company acting as the 
sponsor. The programs will be given 
on the following dates: 

Wednesday, March 2. 

Wednesday, March 16. 

Saturday, March 19. 

Saturday, April 9. 

Saturday, April 23. 

Each concert will be given in the 
evening, beginning at 9 o'clock. 

Distant listeners who have been 
unable to take advantage of the 
afternoon concerts will be enabled on 
this evening to get a taste of the high 
class of music which has been served 
to the listeners living closer-in, by 
the great musical organization of San 
Francisco, and its world-noted con- 
ductor, Alfred Hertz. 



Radio Program 
for Next Week 

KFRC— DON LEE— SAN 
FRANCISCO— 270.1 

Sunday, February 20 

5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — "Twilight Recital." 

6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 8 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 

Monday, February 21 

10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m.— Concert. 

11:00 to 11:30 a. m.— Household hints. 

11:30 to 12:00 a. m.— Studio program. 

12:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 

4:00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

6 :30 to 6:25 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6 :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— Yale Trio. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m .— KFRC Hawaiians. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Blue Monday Jamboree. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Goodrich Silvertown Orchestra. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 
Tuesday. February 22 
10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m.— Concert. 
11:00 to 11:10 a. m. — "Women Who Invest." 
11 :10 to 11 :30 a. m. — "Doings of Dorothy." 
11 :30 to 12 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 
12:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 
00 to 5:30 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

Mac and his Gang. 

Stage and screen. 

Yale Trio. 

Russell Colvin Trio. 
—Weekly meeting KFRC Radio 



-Washington's Birthday special 



6:30 to 6:25 p. m 
6:25 to 6:30 p. m 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m 



5:30 to 6:25 p. m.- 
6:25 to 6:30 p. m.- 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.- 
7:00 to 7:30 p. m.- 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m.- 

Movie Club. 
8:30 to 9:30 p. m.- 

program. 

9 :30 to 12 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Orchestra. 
Wednesday, February 23 
10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m.— Concert. 
11:00 to 11 :30 a. m. — Household hints. 
11 :30 to 12:00 p. m, — Studio program. 
12 :00 to 2 :00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 
4:00 to 5:30 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 
6 :30 to 6 :25 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 
6 :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— Yale Trio. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Donshoo's Orchestra. 

8 :00 to 9:00 p. m.— KFRC Little Symphony Orchestra. 
8:00 to 9:00 p. m. — Musical educational talk 

9 :30 to 10 :00 p.m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday. February 24 

10:00 to 11 :00 a. m.— Concert. 

11:00 to 11:20 a. m — "Doings of Dorothy." 

11 :20 to 12 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 

12:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 

4:00 to 5:30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

-Mac and his Gang. 

-Stage and screen. 

-Yale Trio. 

-Courtesy program. 

-Studio program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

10:00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 
Friday, February 25 

10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m.— Concert. 

11:00 to 11 :20 a. m. — Aunt Martha's talk. 
11:20 to 11:30 a. m.— Chat with Victor. 

1 1 :30 to 12 :00 noon — Studio program. 

12:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 

4 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

5:30 to 6 :25 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6:25 to 6:30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— Yale Trio. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m. — Studio program. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— KFRC Little Symphony Orchestra 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

Saturday, February 26 

10 :00 to 11 :00 a. m.— Concert. 

11 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Amateur Try-outs. 

12:00 to 2 :00 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Concert Orchestra. 

4 :00 to 5 :30 p. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance Orchestra. 

5:30 to 6 :25 p. m. — Mac and his Gang. 

6 :25 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stage and screen. 
f-:30 to 7 :00 p. m.— Yale Trio. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Studio program. 

8 :00 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. — Mark Hopkins Dance 

Orchestra. 

KPO— HALE BROS. AND THE CHRON- 
ICLE, SAN FRANCISCO— 428.3 

Sunday, February 20 

9:46 to 10:45 a.m. — Undenominational and non-sec- 
tarian church service. 

10 :45 a. m. — Weather forecast. 

2:40 to 4:15 p. m.— Concert of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra. Alfred Hertz, director, to be 
broadcast from the New Curran Theater by KPO, 
KFI and KGO. 



February 19, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Radio Program for Next Week 



11 



6:00 to 6:30 p.m. — States Restaurant Orchestra. 

6:30 p.m. — General information. 

6:35 to 8:35 p.m. — Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

8:35 to 9:15 p.m. —Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

9:15 to 10:15 p.m. — Program by John Powell, pi- 
anist, and Mildred Epsteen, soprano. 

10:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his Cali- 
fornianB. 

Monday, February 21 

6:45, 7:15 and 7:45 a.m. — Health exercises. 

10:30 a.m. — Weather forecast. 

10:45 a.m. — Home Service Talk. 

12:00 noon— Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1 :00 to 2 :00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

6 :30 to 6 :15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :15 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 
7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 8 :10 p. m. — Chamber of Commerce talk. 

8:10 to 8 :25 p. m.— Book reviews by Harold A. Small. 

8:25 to 9:00 p. m. — Bridge lesson No. 18. 

9:00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Program by Neapolitan Quartet. 

10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.— Billy Long's Cabirians. 

11 :00 to 12:00 p. m.— KPO's Variety hour. 

Tuesday, February 22 

6:45, 7:15 and 7:45 a.m. — Health exercises. 

10 :30 a. m. — Weather report. 

10:45 a.m. — Cooking hints and recipes. 

12 :00 noon — Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

3 :30 to 5:30 p. m.— Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

5:30 to 6:15 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :15 to 6 :30 p. m. — Stock market quotations. 

6:30 to 7 :00 p. m. — States Restaurant Orchestra. 

7:00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— "Uda Waldrop hour." 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m,— Program by KPO Trio and Gypsy 

and Marta. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Palace Hotel Dance Orchestra. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— John Wolohan and his Cali- 

fornians. 

Wednesday, February 23 

6:45. 7:15 and 7:45 a. m.— Health exercises. 

10:30 a.m. — Weather report. 

10:45 a. m.— Home service talk. 

12:00 noon — Time signals, Scripture reading. 

1:00 to 2:00 p. m. — Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

3:30 to 5:30 p. m. — Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

6:30 to 6:16 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:16 to 6:30 p. m.— Stock market quotations. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant Orchestra. 

7:00 to 7:30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

7:30 to 8:00 p. m. — DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Program by Atwater Kent artists. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— States Restaurant Orchestra. 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Billy Long's Cabirians. 

Thursday, February 24 

6:45. 7:15 and 7:45 a.m. — Health exercises. 

10 :30 a. m. —Weather report. 

12:00 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 

1-00 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

3 :30 to 6:30 p. m.— Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 

6:30 to 6:15 p. m.— Children's hour. 

6:15 to 6:30 p. m.— Stock market quotations. 

6 :S0 to 7 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant Orchestra. 

7 :00 to 7:30 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 
7:80 to 8:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p, m.— Studio program. 

9:00 to 10 :00 p.m.— Program by 30th Coast Artillery 

10 -OtTto 11:00 p. m.— Palace Hotel Dance Orchestra, 
11:00 to 12:00 p. m. John Wolohan and his Cali- 
fornianB. 

Friday, February 25 

6:46. 7:15 and 7:45 a.m.- Health excretes. 

10:S0a. m.- Weather report. 

10:35 a.m. Fashion talk. 

10:45 a. m.— Home service talk. 

12:00 noon— Time signals. Scripture reading. 

12:15 p. m.— Talk from the Commonwealth Club 

luncheon. _ . , 

1:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra. 
3:30 to 6:30 p. m. — Pnlace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 
5:30 to 6:15 p. m.— Children's hour. 
6:16 to 6:30 p. m.— Stock market ipiotationa. 
§:80 tO 7 :20 p. m.— Statflfl Restaurant OreJWBtl*. 
7 :20 to 7 :80 p. m.- "Sports-on-the-Air." 
7 :3(1 tC 8:00 p. m. DX. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Walter Krausgnll's Orchestra. 
10:00 to 11 :00 p. m.— States Restaurant Orchestra. 
11 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — John Wolohan and his Cali- 

fornians. 

Saturday, February 26 

6:45. 7:15 and 7 :45 a.m. -Health exercises. 
10:30 a. m. Weather report, 
10:45a.m. -Cooking hints and recipe?. 
12:00 noon- Time signals. Scripture reading. 
1 :00 to 2:00 p. m. Fairmont Hotel Concert Orchestra 
3:30 to 5:S0 p. m — Palace Hotel Concert Orchestra. 
6:16 to 6:80 p. m. Stock market quotations. 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — States Restaurant Orchestra. 
7:80 toS:00 p. m.— DX. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m. Simultaneous broadcast by KPO 
and KFI 



9:00 to 10 :00 p.m.— Palace Hotel Dance Orchestra. 

I on* P ", m - n t rt ° la - m r Walter Krausgrill's Orchestra. 
y.00 to 11:00 p. m.— Intermissions by Maurice Gunsky. 

KJBS— JULIUS BRUNTON & SONS 
CO., SAN FRANCISCO— 220 

Daily Except Sunday 

? -nS ^ i X nn° a - m — 7 ocaI and Instrumental selections. 

pwlv ■°°K? , ?^ Vocal and lnstrum ental selections. 

Friday nights 9:30 p.m. to 11 :00 p. m.— "The Happi- 
ness Boys and Studio program. 

U ;£° p ;"- n t0 i 2 = 00 P- m - — Studio program featuring 
the "Willard Power Units." 

KFWI— RADIO ENTERTAINMENTS 
INC., SAN FRANCISCO— 250 

Saturday, February 19 

8:00 p.m. to 3:00 a.m. — Widows and Orphans Ball 
broadcast exclusively by KFWI from the Civic 
Auditorium. San Francisco. 

Sunday. February 20 

l:00to 2 :30 p.m.— William Bennett recital. 

7 :50 to 9 :00 p. m. — Services broadcast from Fifth 

Church of Christ, Scientist. 
9:00 to 9:15 p. m.— Studio program. 
9:15 to 10:15 p. m.— Organ recital. 

Monday, February 21 i 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Paul's Hawaiians. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— KFWI Trio. 

9:00 toll :00 p. m.— Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Wednesday, February 23 

6 :30 to 6 :50 p. m. — Vocal numbers. 

6 :50 to 7 :30 p. m.— Dave Blackman's Orchestra. 

8:00 to 8 :20 p. m. — Vocal selections. 

8:20 to 8:30 p. m.— Becker Storage, tenor. 

8 :30 to 9 :00 p. m.— Instrumental solos 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— The "Fah Dang Wui." the Feast 

of the Lanterns. 
10:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 
Thursday, February 24 
6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Paul's Hawaiians. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m.— Vocal program. 

8 :30 to 9 :00 p. m. — Piano recital. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Orchestra. 

10:00 to 12 p. m.— Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

Friday, February 25 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Dance program. 

8 :00 to 8 :30 p. m.— Panatrope concert. 

8:30 to 9:00 p. m.— Health lecture. 

9:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Billy La Barba's Orchestra. 

Saturday. February 26 

9:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Paul Kelli's Orchestra. 

KYA— PACIFIC BROADCASTING CORP., 
SAN FRANCISCO— 399.8 

Sunday. February 20 

11 :00 a. m.— Services of Central Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

7:30 p. m.— Services of the Central Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. 

Monday, February 21 

11 :00 to 12:00 noon— Hour of music. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8 :00 to 8 :30 p. m. — Chinese-American vocal numbers. 

8 :S0 to 10 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Orchestra. 

Tuesday, February 22 

1 1 :00 to 12 :00 noon— Hour of music. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8 :00 to 8:30 p. m. — Initiation program of the Ameri- 
can Legion. 

8:30 to 10:00 p. m. — Program. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Orchestra, 

Wednesday. February 23 

II :00 to 12 :00 noon — Hour of music. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Program by Grace Marie 
Com pa g no. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Orchestra. 

Thursday. February 24 

11 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Hour of music. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

6:30 to 7:30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Silent. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Dance Orchestra. 

Friday. February 25 

1 1 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Hour of music. 

- 2 :00 p. m.— Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 
6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

S :00 to 10:00 p. m. — Program from the main studio. 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m— Clift Hotel Dance Orchestra. 

Saturday, February 2fi 

1 1 :00 to 12 :00 noon — Hour of mu?ic. 

12:30 to 2:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

* :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Clift Hotel Concert Trio. 

S :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Silent- 

10:00 to 11:00 p. m. — Clift Hotel Dance Orchestra. 

KGTT — GLAD TIDINGS TEMPLE, SAN 
FRANCISCO— 207 

Sunday. February 20 

2 :30 to 3 :00 p. m. — Sunday school. 

- ;iiO p. m. — Temple service. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m.- -Evening service. 
Monday. February 21 



12 :30 1 to 1:00 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading. 

Tuesday. February 22 

12:80 to 1 :00 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 

8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 

Wednesday, February 23 

12:30 to 1 :00 p. m.— Daily Scripture reading. 

2 :30 to 4 :00 p. m. — Divine healing service. 
8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 
Thursday, February 24 

12:30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
Friday, February 26 

12 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 
8 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Studio program. 

3 :00 to 4 :00 p. m.— Sunshine hour. 
Saturday, February 26 

12 :30 to 1 :00 p. m. — Daily Scripture reading. 



HOTEL 




wnang 



On Top o' the World 
■with 

£d DI E Harkne ss 

and his orchestra 

Dinner Dance d> Supper Dance 
Nightly— except Sunday. Tea every 
afternoon— except Sunday— {out 
til six. ft Special Dollar Tea 
Dansant Monday and Saturday 
Afternoons. 

HOTEL MARK HOPKINS 

California at Mason 

'Davenport 6300 




AT YOUR OWN HOME 

ANY TIME— ONLY $1.50 

Just Telephone 

Hemlock 6976 

NATIONAL RADIO SERVICE 

1136 Mission St.. San Francisco 

? Can Make Your Set Perform 

Better Than Ever 
Aerials Erected and Repaired 



.e, you pay no more j£ 

BESTFLOWHg 




"Vm±$xx of a. Thousand 3ardens' 

224-226 GrantAve. TeL Kearny 4975 



12 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1927 



Radio Program for Next Week 



KGO— GENERAL ELECTRIC CO- 
OAKLAND— 361 

Sunday, February 20 

11:00 a.m. — First Baptist Church service, Oakland. 
2:40 p.m. — San Francisco Symphony Orchestra con- 
cert, direction of Alfred Hertz. 
4:00 p.m.- — Vesper service. 

6 :30 p. m. to 7 :30 p. m.— -Bern's Little Symphony. 
7:30 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7 :35 p. m.— First Congregational Church service, San 

Franc sco. 
9:0U to 10:00 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
Monday, February 21 
11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Concert. 
12:00 noon— -Time signal. 
12 :30 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 
1:30 p.m. — New York stocks. 
1:37 p.m. — San Francisco stocks. 
1 :42 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — California Federation of Women's 

Clubs. 
5:30 to 6:00 p. m. — KGO Kiddies' Club. 
6 :00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6 :55 p. m. — News. 

7 :03 p. m. — Weather. 

7:06 p.m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, Metals. 

7:14 p.m. — N. Y. stocks (closing) 

7:21p.m. — S. F. stocks (closing). 

Tuesday, February 22 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

12:00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

5 :00 p. m. — "Mental Measurements'' lectures. 
6:00 to 6:55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Oakland Studio, The Pilgrims. 

9:00 p. m.— "Chats About New Books." 

9:20 p.m. — Surprise broadcast. 

Wednesday, February 23 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

12:00 noon— Time signal. 

12:30 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1:30 p.m. — N. Y. stocks. 

1:37 p. m. — S. F. stocks 

1 :42 p. m. — Weather Bureau report. 

5 :30 p. m.— "For Instance," by General Jackson. 

6 :00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

6 :55 p. m. — News. 

7 :03 p. m.— Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p. m.— S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, Metals. 

7:11p.m. — N. Y. stocks (closing). 

7:12p.m.— S. F. stocks (closing). 

8:00 p.m. — S. F. stuJio. Farm program. 

8:10 p.m. (Series)— "The Cattle Trail." 

8:20 p.m. — An interview with the Agricultural 

Economist. 
8:30 p. m.— W. O. W. Male Trio. 
8:40 p. m.— Address, "Economic Trends in the Dairy 

Industry." 
9:00 p. m.— W. O. W. Male Trio. 
Thursday. February 24 
11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Concert. 
12:00 noon— Time signal. 
12:30 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 
1:30 p.m. — N. Y. stocks. 

I -.37 p. m. — S. F. stocks. 

1 :42 p.m.— Weather Bureau report. 

5 :00 to 6:00 p. m.— "Friend to Boys." 

6:00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 

f<:55 p. m. — News. 

7:03 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p.m. — S. F. Produce, Grain, Cotton, Metals. 

7:14 p.m. — N. Y. stocks (closing). 

7:21p.m. — S. F. stocks (closing). 

8:00 to 9:00 p. m.— Concert by KGO Little Symphony 

Orchestra, Carl Rhodehamel conducting. 
9:00 to 12:00 p. m. — John Philpott's Midshipmen. 
Friday. February 25 

II :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Concert. 
12:00 noon— Time signal. 

12:30 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

1 :30 p. m.— N. Y. stocks. 

1 :37 p. m.— S. F. stocks. 

1:42 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

6 :00 to 6 :55 p. m. — Bern's Little Symphony. 
6:55 p. m. — News. 

7:03 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

7:06 p.m. — S. F. Produce, Grain. Cotton. Metals. 

7:14 p.m. — N. Y. stocks (closing). 

7:21p.m. — S. F. stocks (closing). 

8:00 p.m. (Hotel St. Francis studio)— The Arcadians. 

Saturday, February 26 

11 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

12 :00 noon — Time signal. 

12:30 p.m. — Weather Bureau report. 

8:00 p.m. — "Weekly Sport Review." 

8:15 to 9:15 p. m. — Program from Hotel Leamington. 

9 :15 p. m. to 1 :00 a. m. — Wilt Gunzendorfer's Band. 

KTAB— ASSOCIATED BROADCASTERS, 
OAKLAND— 302.8 

Sunday, February 20 

9:45 to 10:45 a. m. — Professor E. C. Linsley's Bible 

class. 
11:00 a.m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Bapt'st Church. 

7 :45 p. m. — Services of Tenth Avenue Baptist Church. 
9:30 to 11 :00 p. m. — After-Service concert. 

Monday, February 21 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9 :15 to 9 :45 a. m. — Shopnjng hour. 

5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 



6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Twilight hour. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Shopping hour. 
8:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Colonial music. 
Tuesday. February 22 

8 :45 to y :16 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer.' 
9:15 to 9 :45 a. m. — Shopping hour. 

9:45 to 10 :00 a. m. — "Diet and Health." 

5 :00 to 6:00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :3u to 7 :00 p. m, — Twilight hour. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Shopping hour. 

8 :00 to 8 :15 p. m. — "Fifteen Minutes with Stump 

Collectors." 
S :15 to 10 :00 p. m.— KTAB Quartet. 
Wednesday, February 23 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping hour. 
5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour, 
fa :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Twilight hour. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Shopping hour. 

8 :00 to 8:45 p. m. — The Golden Gate Choral Cub. 

8 :45 to 9 :00 p. m. — Program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Gwyn.fi Jones, tenor. 
Thursday, February 24 

8 :45 to y :15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9 :15 to 9 :45 a. m. — Shopping hour. 

5 :00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :30 to 7 :00 p. m. — Twilight hour. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Shopping hour. 
Friday, February 25 

8:45 10 9 :15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 

9 :15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping hour. 
5:00 to 6 :00 p. m. — Children's hour. 

6 :00 to 6 :20 p. m. — Dr. Thompson. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Shopping hour. 

8 :0u to 9 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:00 p. m. — Goat island Goats. 
Saturday. February 26 

8:45 to 9:15 a. m. — "The Hour of Prayer." 
9:15 to 9:45 a. m. — Shopping hour. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Shopping hour. 

KLX— OAKLAND TRIBUNE, 
OAKlAWD — 509 

Monday. February zl 

10 :30 a. m. — Marina Lee. 

7 :00 to ( :3U p. m. — iNews broadcast. 

8 :00 lo y :0U p. m. — Hawaiian program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Weekiy meeung of Lake Merritt 

Ducks. 
Tuesday. February 22 
7 :00 to * :30 p. m. — i\ews broadcast. 
Wednesday, February 23 
10:30 a. m.— Martha Lee. 
6:30 to 7:00 p. m.— Athens Ath. Club dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 

8 :00 to 9 :U0 p. m. — Educational program. 

9 :00 to 10:00 p. m. — Second program by Oakland Sym- 

phonic Ensemble. 
Thursday. Fei:ruaiy 24 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
Friday, February 25 
10:30 a. m.— Martha Lee. 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — News broadcast. 
8:00 to 9 :45 p. m. — Special gala program. 
9:45 to 10:30 p. m.— Athens Athletic Club orchestra. 
Saturday. February 26 
7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m.- News broadcast. 

KFUS— GOSPEL RADIO, OAKLAND— 256 

Sunday. February 20 

9 :00 a. m. — Exposition of the International Sunday 

school lesson. 
11 :00 to 12:00 noon — Church services. 
7 :45 lo 9 :00 p. m. — Evening service. 
Monday, February 21 

10:00 a.m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
Tuesday, February 22 

4 :00 to 5 :00 p. m. — Sacred variety program. 
Wednesday. February 23 
8:00 p.m. — Sacred songs. 

10:00 a.m. — The hour of Christian Ministry. 
Friday. February 25 

10 :00 a. m.— The hour of Christian Ministry. 
2 :00 to 3 :00 p. m. — Women's Bible study hour. 

8:00 p. m. — Telephone or write in your health ques- 
tions and they will be informally discussed, 
Saturday, February 26 
1 :30 to 2 :30 p. m. — Children's church broadcast . 

6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. — Gospel Weather Bureau forecast. 

Announcements of churches for Sunday. 

KFI— EARLE C. ANTHONY, INC., 
LOS ANGELES— 467 

(Copyr:ght 1925 by Earle C. Anthony, Inc. I 
Sunday, February 20 
10:00 a.m. — Morning services. 

11 :00 a. m.— Temple Baptist Church. 

2:45 p. m.— San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, di- 
rection of Alfred Hertz, presented by the Standard 
Oil Company of California. Broadcast by KFI, 
KPO and KGO. 

6:00 p. m. — Weekly program of classical and semi- 
classical music, by the Russian Academy of Musical 
Art trio. 

7 :00 p. m. -Aeolian organ recital, Alex Reilly at the 

console. 
8:00 p. m. — -Packard classic hour. 
9:00 p.m. — Bob Bottger and his Venetians dance 

orchestra. 
10 :00 p. m.— Packard Six Orchestra. 



Monday. February 21 

10 :20 to 10 :40 a. m. — Furnishings for the home, Agnes 
White. 

10:40 to 11 :00 a. m.— Betty Crocker Gold Medal Flour 
talks. 

11 :10 to 11 :30 a. m.— Food talks by Aenes White. 
5:30 p.m. — Virgil Ray's Winter Garden Orche3tra. 
6:15 p. m.- — Radiotorial. 

6:30 p.m. — Vest Pocket program. 

7:00 p.m. — Program by the Starke Sisters. 

8 :00 p. m. — Brahms Quartet, featuring Ferenz Steiner, 

cellist. 
9:00 p. m.— Ruth Palethrope, soprano, and Lewis A. 

Kerwin, concert pianist. 
10:00 p. m. —Weekly program, presenting vaudeville 

artists, by Meiklejohn Bros. 
Tuesday, February 22 

5 :30 to 6 :00 p. m. — The Dragon Hawaiians. 

6 :00 to 6 :15 p. m. — Josephine Lachmar. 
6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial. 

f*:30 p. m. — Vest Pocket period. 

7:00 p. m. — Jack Martin's Hawaiian Trio. 

8:00 p.m. — Weekly program by the Gattone String 

Quartet. 
9:00 p. m. — Mrs. Edward C. Crossman, contralto. 
10:00 p.m. — Azure Music Club. Glenn Edmunds and 

his Collegians Dance Orchestra. 
Wednesday, February 23 
10:20 to 10:40 a. m.— Child Training talks by Agnes 

White. 
10:40 to 11:00 a. m.— Betty Crocker Gold Medal Flour 

talks. 
11 :10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food talks by Agnes White. 
5:30 p. m. — Jack Murray's Italian Village Orchestra 

and soloists. 
6:15 p. m.- — Radiotorial. 
6 :30 p. m. — Vest Pocket period. 
7:00 p.m. — Ray Fisher's Original Victorians Dance 

Orchestra, 



Follow the 

(Jolden ^ad 

to Health! 

Tune in on KPO every morn- 
ing at 6:45 - 7:15 or 7:45 for 
the Daily Golden Road to 
Health Exercises 

These exercises are given to 
the public by The Golden State 
Milk Products Company of 
California; for 22 years the 
manufacturers of Golden State 
Butter — the standard of qual- 
ity in California. 

Golden State 
Butter - Eggs - Cheese 




February 19, 1927 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



13 



Radio Program for Next Week 



1 :30 p. m. — Nick Harris, detective stories. 

7:45 p.m. — Eugene Whisenant, popular singer. 

8 :00 p. m. — Program by Caipet Male Quartet. Calpet 
Orchestra, Chico De Verde, director ; Paul Roberta, 
tenor. Presented by the California Petroleum Cor- 
poration. 

9:00 p.m. — Orline Burrow, violinist. 

10 :00 p. m. — Program by Sunset Instrumental Quar- 
tet, Dorothy Ruth Miller, pianist. 

Thursday, February 24 

6:30 p.m. — Sebastian's Cotton Club Orchestra. 

6:15 p. m. — Radiotorial. 

6:30 p. m. — Clarice Russell and Leslie Adams. 

1 :00 p. m. — Weekly program presented by the Uni- 
versity of Southern California. 

8:00 p.m. — KFI drama hour. 

9:00 p.m. — Monrovia High School Girls Little 
Symphony. . 

10 :00 p. m. — Johnston and Farrels Music Box hour. 

Friday, February 25 

10 :20 to 10 :40 a. m. — Talk on home management by 
Agnes White. 

10:40 to 11:00 a. m.— Betty Crocker Gold Medal Flour 

11:10 to 11:30 a. m. — Food talks by Agnes White. 

5:30 p.m. — Eugene Blscailuz and program by the 
Sheriff's office. 

6:15 p.m.— KFI Radiotorial period. 

6 :30 p. m. — Program by Lou Parker. 

7 :00 p. m. — Program by Paul Roberts and Leslie 
Adams. 

8:00 p.m. — Aeolian organ recital. Alex Reilly at the 
console. 

9:00 p.m. — Alma Frances Gordon, contralto. 

10:00 p.m. — Packard Ballad Hour. 

Saturday, February 26 

5:30 p.m. — Mosby's Hot Five Dance Orchestra. 

6:15 p.m. — Radiotorial period. 

6:30 p.m. — Tarvin Sisters. 

7:30 p.m. — Felipe Delgado. Media Hora Espanola. 

8:00 p.m. — Mission Bell Orchestra. Pryor Moore, di- 
rector ; Eva Olivotti and James Burroughs. Pre- 
sented by the Los Angeles Soap Company. Broad- 
cast by KFI, KPO and KGO. 

9:00 p.m. — Emma Kimmel. soprano. 

10:00 p.m. — Packard Radio Club. 

11 :00 p. m. — KFI Midnight Frolic. 

KNX— L. A. EVENING EXPRESS, 
LOS ANGELES— 337 

Daily Except Sunday 

8 :00 a. m. — Inspirational talk and morning prayer. 
8:55 a.m. — Time signals. 

9 :00 a. m. — Shopping news. 

10:30 a.m. — Household economics (except Friday and 
Saturday). 

12 :00 noon — -Orchestra, George Redman, director. 
1:30 p.m. —The Book Work. 

4:00 p.m. — Lost and Found column. 

4 :65 p. m. — Market reports. 

fi :30 p. m. — Orthophonic Victrola. 

6:00 p.m. — George Redman's Concert Orchestra. 

6:30 p.m. — Dinner hour concert. 

Sunday, February 20 

10:00 a.m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood. 

2 :00 to 4 :00 p. m. — Musical program, 
4:00 p. m.— Roberts Golden State Band. 

5 :15 p.m. — Wilshire All-Souls Church. 
6:80 p. m. — Hollywood Unitarian Church. 

7:00 p.m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood. 

8 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra. 

9:00 p.m. — Courtesy program. 

Monday, Fehruary 21 

8:00p.m. — First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood. 

7:00 p.m. — Orthophonic Victrola. 

7 :30 p. m.— Playlet. 

8 :00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 
9:00 p. m.— Courtesy program. 
10:00 p. m.— KNX feature program. 

11 :00 p. m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 
Tuesday, Fehruary 22 

3 :00 p. m. — Combined program of the Police and 

Fire Departments. 

4 :00 p. m. — Radio matinee. 

7 :00 p. m. — Feature program. 

8 :00 p, m. — Feature program. 
9:00 p.m. — Courtesy program. 

10:00 p. m.— Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Wednesday. Fehruary 23 

3 :00 p. m. — Paul Hugon. 

4:00p.m. — "What Have You?" 

7:00p.m. — Orthophonic Victrola. 

7 :30 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m.- — Courtesy program. 

11 :00 p. m.— Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Thursday. Februarv 24 

11 :00 a. m.— Nature talk. 

7 :00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8:00 p. m.— Courtesy program. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Feature program. 
10:00 p.m. — Feature program. 

11:00 p.m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 
Friday. February 25 

3 :00 p. m. — Musical program. 

4 :00 p. ni. — Boy Scout*' musical program. 
7 :00 p. m. — Feature program. 

8:00 p. m. — Courtesy program. 

9:00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p. m.- -American Legion Stadium. 

11:00 p.m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

Saturday. February 26 

3:00 p.m.- Town Crier of the Day and his Pals. 

7 :00 p. m. — Stories of insect life. 



7:15 p.m. — Announcement of Sunday services. 

7 :30 p. m. — Feature program. 

8 :00 p. m. — Feature program. 

9 :00 p. m. — Feature program. 

10:00 p.m. — Gus Arnheim's Orchestra. 

11:00 p.m. — KNX Frolic from the main studio. 

KFWB— WARNER BROS., 
HOLLYWOOD— 252 

Sunday, February 20 

2:00 to 3:00 p. m. — Organ recital. 

8 :30 to 9 :00 p. m. — Studio program. 

9 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Frolic. 
Monday, February 21 

12 :30 to 1 :30 p. m— Classified hour. 
5 :00 to 5 :40 p. m. — Children's period. 

5 :40 to 6:00 p. m. — "Physiology and Psychology of 

Beauty." 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner hour concert. 

7 :00 to 8 :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra and soloists. 

8 :00 to 8:10 p. m. — Daily news items. 

8:10 to 9:00 p. m. — Bill Henry, popular songs. 

9 :00 to 9 :50 p. m. — European Novelty Orchestra. 
9 :50 to 10 :00 p. m. — Daily news items. 

10:00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m.— Henry Halstead and his 

orchestra. 
Tuesday, February 22 
12 :30 to 1 :30 p. m. — Classified hour. 

4 :45 to 5 :00 p. m. — "Diet." 

5 :00 to 5 :40 p. m.— Children's period. 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m.— "Physiology and Psychology of 

Beauty." 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m, — Dinner hour concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :3Q.p. m. — Studio program. 

7 :30 to 7 :50 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

7 :50 to 8 :00 p. m.— Daily news items. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m— Hawaiian Trio. 

9:00 to 9:50 p. m. — Warner Bros. String Trio. 

9 :50 to 10 :00 p. m. — Daily news items. 

10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 

11:00 to 12:00 p. m— Henry Halstead and his 

orchestra. 
Wednesday, February 23 
12 :30 to 1 :30 p. m. — Classified hour. 
5 :00 to 5 :40 p. m. — Children's period. 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m. — "Physiology and Psychology of 

Beauty." 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Thirty minutes of sunshine. 
7 :30 to 7 :50 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

7 :50 to 8 :00 p. m.— Daily news items. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Warner Bros. Orchestra. 
9:00 to 9:50 p. m. — String Trio. 

9 :50 to 10 :00 p. m.— Daily news items. 

10 :00 to 11 :00 p. m. — Dance music. 

11 :00 to 12 :00 p. m.— Henry Halstead and his 

orchestra. 
Thursday, February 24 
12 :30 to 1 :30 p. m. — Classified hour. 

5 :40 to 6 :00 p. m.— "Physiology and Psychology of 

Beauty." 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Program. 

7 :30 to 7 :50 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 
7:50 to R :00 p. m. — Daily news items. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m. — Warner Bros. Orchestra. 
9:00 to 9:50 p. m.— String Trio. 

9 :50 to 10 :00 p. m. — Daily news items. 

10 -.00 to 11 :00 p. m.— Rainbow hour. 

11 :00 to 12:00 p. m.— Henry Halstead and his 
orchestra. 

Friday, Fehruary 25 

12 :S0 to 1 :30 p. m— Classified hour. 

5:40 to 6:00 p. m.— "Physiology and Psychology of 
Beauty." 

6 :00 to 7 :0(1 p. m. — Dinner hour concert. 

? :00 to 7 :30 p. m.— Warner Bros. Orchestra. 

7 >80 to B :00 p. m. — Concert orchestra and soloist. 

8 :00 to 8 :10 p. m.— Daily news items. 

8:10 to 9:00 p. m.— Warner Bros. Orchestra. 
9:00 to 9:45 p. m. —Melody makers* period. 

9 :4R to 10 :00 p. m.— Studio chatter. 

10 :00 to 11 :f10 p. m.— Rainbow hour. 

1 1 :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Henry Halstead and his 
orchestra. 

Saturday. Fehruary 26 
12:30 to 1 :30 p. m— Classified hour. 
5:40 to 6:00 p. m.— "Physiology and Psychology of 
Beautv," 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner hour eoncert- 

7 :00 to B :00 P- m.— Popular songs. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Program. 

9:00 to 1^:00 n. m. —String Quartet. 
10:00 to II :00 p. m. — Rainbow hour. 
H :00 to 12 :00 p. m. — Henry Halstead and hi? 
orchestra. 

KGW— MORVIXG OREGOMAN. 
PORTLAND— 491.5 

SundaT. Fehruarv 20 

7 >SQ to 9 p. m.— Evening services. 

9 :00 to 10 p. m. — Concert program. 

Mnndav. Fehruary 21 

fi -06 to 7 :00 p. m.— Dinner concert- 

■ 7 :30 p. m.— Children's program. 
7 :8Q to 7 :15 p. m.— Utility service. 

10:00 p. m.— Vaudeville entertainment. 
10:fl0to to 12 :00 p. m.— Dance music. 
Tue«d*r. Fehruary ** 

6 -00 to ~ :0O p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 SO to 7 :4G p. m.— Utility service. 

| -00 to 10 on p. ni.— Educational program. 

10 :00to to 12 :00 p. m.— Dance music. 



Wednesday, February 23 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :15 p. m.— Utility service. 

7:30 to8:00p. m.— Alh.rls Poultry School. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Concert. 
Thursday. February 24 

lj :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m. — Utility service. 

7 :45 to 8 :00 p. m.— Lecture. 

8:00 to 10:00 p. m.— Vaudeville entertainment. 

Friday, February 25 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7:30 to 8:00p. m. — Weekly meeting of the KGW 
Movie Club. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Concert. 

9:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Dance music. 

10:30 to 12:00 p. m. — Weekly Frolic of the Keep 

Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls. 
Saturday, February 26 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 to 7 :45 p. m. — Weather report. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m. — Concert. 

10 :00 to 12 :00 p. m — Dance music. 

KFOA— RHODES DEPARTMENT STORE, 
SEATTLE— 454.3 

Monday, February 21 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner music. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p, m. — Popular song program. 

7 :30 to 8:00 p. m.— Cruise of the Sound Ferry Line 

Buccaneers. 
8:15 to 8:30 p. m.— Industrial News. 
Tuesday, February 22 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner music. 

7 :00 to 7 :30 p. m. — Children's program. 

7 :30 to 8 :00 p. m. — Pitchford Sisters. 
8:00 to 8:30 p. m. — Bridge game. 

8 :30 to 9 :00 p. m.— Male quartet. 
Wednesday. February 23 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner music. 

7 :00 to 8 :00 p. m. — Entertainers. 

8 :00 to 9 :00 p. m.— Orchestra. 

9 :00 to 10 :00 p. m.— Orchestra and soloists. 
Thursday. February 24 

6 :00 to fi :30 p. m. — Dinner music. 
6 :30 to 7 :30 p. m. —Orchestra. 
8 :00 to 8 :80 p. m — Doc Proelss. 
8:30 to 9:30 p. m.— Trio De Luxe. 
Friday. February 25 

6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner music. 

7 :00 to H :00 p. m. — Studio program. 
9:00 to 10:30 p. m. — Kirkland Serenaders. 

10 :30 to 12 :00 p. m.— Weekly frolic of the "Keep 
Growing Wiser Order of Hoot Owls." 

Saturday. Fehruary 26 

2 :00 to 2 :30 p. m. — Homemakers' and Shoppers' 

Burea. 
4 :30 to 5 :00 p. m. — Afternoon news items. 
6 :00 to 7 :00 p. m. — Dinner music, 

8 :30 to 9 :30 p. m. — Popular studio program. 

KOA— GENERAL ELECTRIC, DENVER 
—322.4 (Mountain Time) 

Sunday. February 20 

10:50 a. m. — Church service, 

6 :30 p. m. — Organ recital. 

7 :50 p. m. — Church service. 
Monday. February 21 

6:00 p. m.— New York stocks. 

• ;08 p. m. Chicago grain. 

G :13 p. m. —Live stock : produce. 

fi :2U p. ni.— News bulletins. 

6:30 p. m.— Dinner concert. 

7 :30 p m. — Children's hour. 

K:00p. m. — Instrumental program. 

8:15 p. m. — Studio program. 

Tuesday. Fehruary 22 

6:00 p. m. New York stocks. 

m.- — Chicago grain. 
6:13 p. m. —Livestock : produce. 
6:20 p.m. — News bulletins. 
6:30 p.m. — Dinner concert. 

7 :30 p. m. — Farm question box. 

8 :<ni p. ni.— Auction bridge. 
Wednesday. February 23 

i ni. New York stocks. 
6:08 p. m. — Chicago grain. 
6:13 p. m. — Livestock : produce. 
6:20 p. m. -News bulletins. 
8:27 p. m. — Radio Council talk. 
6:30 p. m. — Dinner concert. 
7:30 p. ni. — -Wynken. Blynken and Nod time. 
8:00 p. m.— Instrumental program. 
S:15 p. m.— Program. 
Thursday. Fehruary 24 
6:00 p.m.— New York stocks. 

ni.— Chicago grain. 
6 :13 p. m. — Livestock : produce. 
6:20 p.m. -News bulletins. 
Friday. February 25 
6 :00 p. m.— New York stocks. 

n. — Chicago grain. 
6 :13 p. m.— Livestock : produce. 

m. — News bulletins. 
6:30 p. m. —Dinner concert. 

... m. — ■"A«:e K ; rk . 

7:30 p. m. — Preview of International Sunday School 

lesson. 
8 :00 p. m. - Instrumental program. 

m. -Studio program. 
Satorday. Fehruary 26 
10:30 p. m.— Dinner program. 



14 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 19, 1927 



(Continued from Page 7) 
Frank McCormick; Paul Stdell and 
his dog, "Spotty" presenting feats of 
balancing and juggling; Harry Mayo 
and Basil Lynn in a humorous skit: 
"You've Dropped the Thread"; Carr 
and Parr, English comedians in an 
eccentric dance. 



Kreisler Recital 

Fritz Kreisler, famous violinist, 
will give his only recital in Northern 
California, tomorrow afternoon (Sun- 
day) in the Civic Auditorium. Carl 
Lamson, pianist, who has been his 
accompanist for many years, will as- 
sist the noted master on the violin. 

Kreisler's program will include sev- 
eral of his transcriptions of works for 
other instruments, which have be- 
come internationally popular. Among 
them will be the Lehar-Kreisler, 
"Frasquita Serenade" ; the De Falla- 
Kreisler, "Danse Espagnole" and the 
Scott-Kreisler, "Lotus-Land." 

Music lovers are looking forward 
to a great treat in anticipation of the 
Kreisler recital with its marvelous 
repertoire including a Mozart Sonata, 
No. 15 in B fiat major ; and the mu- 
sic of Tartini and Tschaikowsky, 
played as only Kreisler ca nplay these 
numbers. 

* * * 

Lecture on Astronomy 

A lecture in Astronomy is to be 
given on Monday, February 21st, at 
8 o'clock p. m. by Dr. William F. 
Meyer, Associate Professor of As- 
tronomy in the University of Califor- 
nia. The lecture will be given in the 
Auditorium of the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Co., 245 Market St., under 
the auspices of the Astronomical So- 
ciety of the Pacific. The subject will 
be "The Problems of the Sun" and is 
free. The public is cordially invited. 

* » * 
At Paul Elder's 

Irving Pichel, who is now director 
of the Lobero Theater, Santa Bar- 
bara, and was formerly director of 
The Berkeley Play House, will read 
Sidney Howard's latest play, "Ned 
McCobb's Daughter," in the Paul 
Elder Gallery, Monday afternoon, 
February 21st, at 3:30 o'clock. This 
play, produced by the Theater Guild, 
is one of the outstanding successes 
of the current season in New York. 

* * * 

Paul Harvey, formerly publisher of 
the International Interpreter and 
widely known as a brilliant lecturer 
on world problems, is to visit San 
Francisco in the near future to give 
a group of lectures in the Bay Region. 



His first appearance is to be in the 
Paul Elder Gallery, Saturday after- 
noon, February 26th, at 2:30 o'clock. 
His subject will be "The Significance 

of America's Stand on Nicaragua." 

* * * 

Theater Arts Club 

The Theater Arts Club, Inc., San 
Francisco's energetic dramatic organ- 
ization, which is making popular the 
production of the one-act play — hav- 
ing specialized on them for nearly 
three years — will stage its February 
performance in the auditorium of the 
Women's City Club, on the 24th of 
this month. 

Talma-Zetta Wilbur, production di- 
rector of the "Little Theatre" group, 
is coaching the players in final re- 
hearsals for the production. The 
vehicles chosen for presentation are 
"Jazz and Minuet," by Ruth Giorloff ; 
"Pomp," by Sada Cowan, author of 
many well-known dramatic frag- 
ments; Booth Tarkington's scream- 
ingly funny sketch, "Station YYYY," 
and an odd bit called "An Idyll of the 
Shop." 

The players will be: Andrew Sal- 
mon, Sara Lee Mercereau, William S. 
Lord, Lawrence Horgan, Madaleine 
Sheehan, Philip Nathan, Boyd Jen- 
kins, Josephine Moschella, Augusta 
Mathias, Dian D'Auber, Madaline 
Bast, Leta Schwartz, Mabel Iverson, 
Margaret Hammond, Stanley W. 
Kerley, J. Clarence Myers, Gustave 
Wennberg, Victor Faure, Augusta 
Schad, Alyce Marean, William Vann 
Connors and James McCormick. 

Granada 

"The Third Degree," famous stage 
melodrama of twenty-five years ago, 
is being shown this week at the 
Granada as a screen play. 

The crux of the story is the third 
degree denouement. Accused of the 
killing of a blackmailer, the innocent 
victim goes through the entire cata- 
logue of now outlawed torture. 

On the stage, Jack Partington pre- 
sents "Four Leaf Clovers." Eddie 
Peabody and the Scovell Marvelous 
Three do their bit. The Granada 
Sweethearts are back from a two 
weeks' engagement at Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Pantages 

The Pantages is celebrating its 
first anniversary week. For the oc- 
casion, Alexander Pantages has 
booked the screen play of Harold Bell 
Wright's "The Winning of Barbara 
Worth," starring Ronald Colman and 
Vilma Banky. 

"The Winning of Barbara Worth" 
is a glowing tale of those pioneers 
who battled with the menace of 
water, first in its total absence and 
then in its overflowing presence. It 
is the story of vast lands reclaimed 



and the reclamation of a man's soul. 
Capitol 

Numberless brooks bountifully 
stocked with trout and salmon formed 
a fisherman's paradise that Captain 
Jack Robertson and Art Young found 
on their two-year journey through 
Alaska, armed with only a bow and 
arrow to protect themselves from at- 
tack by wild animals. Thei radven- 
tures are being shown for the first 
time on the screen this week at the 
Capitol. 

The spring of the year found the 
two men on the Island of Kodiak. It 

(Continued on Page 22) 




NEW ORLEANS' 

To better serve our many friends and 
patrons over '400,000.00 has been 
expended in reconstruction to 
maintain this famous hostelry as 

One of Americas leading Hotels; 

ACCOMMODATING 1000 GUESTS 

Lai$e rooms with unusually high 
ceilings and Jood ventilation ab- 
solutely essential to the Southern 
climate make for perfect comfort. 
Alfred S. Aimer and Co..ud. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 

Send (or descriptive folder Ticket Offices of 
Illustrated Mdrdi Gras all Transportation 
PrQ^C/ram for the asking lines in lobby 



4 




S. A. LOVEJOY 

WILL BRING 

ORDER 
Out of Chaos!